Thomas Sipple House

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Thomas Sipple House

Sipple Chipman Georgetown DE.JPG

House in 2013
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Location N. Bedford & New Sts., Georgetown, Delaware
Coordinates 38°41′34″N75°23′22″W / 38.69278°N 75.38944°W / 38.69278; -75.38944 Coordinates: 38°41′34″N75°23′22″W / 38.69278°N 75.38944°W / 38.69278; -75.38944
Area 0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built 1861 (1861)
Built by Sipple, Thomas
Architectural style Greek Revival, Italianate
NRHP reference # 85002007 [1]
Added to NRHP September 5, 1985

Thomas Sipple House, also known as the Chipman House and Boxwood Manor, is a historic home located at Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware. It was built in 1861, and is a two-story, five bay, single pile frame dwelling with a two-story rear ell. It sits on a brick foundation and has a low-pitched gable roof. The house was modified in 1912, to enclose a rear porch, add a sleeping porch, and add a two-story porch connecting the house to two outbuildings. It features Greek Revival and Italianate style design elements. [2]

Georgetown, Delaware Town in Delaware, United States

Georgetown is a town in and the county seat of Sussex County, Delaware, United States. According to the 2010 census, the population of the town is 6,422, an increase of 38.3% over the previous decade.

Sussex County, Delaware County in the United States

Sussex County is a county located in the southern part of the U.S. state of Delaware, on the Delmarva Peninsula. As of the 2010 census, the population was 197,145. The county seat is Georgetown.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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