Thomas Sipple House

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Thomas Sipple House
Sipple Chipman Georgetown DE.JPG
House in 2013
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LocationN. Bedford & New Sts., Georgetown, Delaware
Coordinates 38°41′34″N75°23′22″W / 38.69278°N 75.38944°W / 38.69278; -75.38944 Coordinates: 38°41′34″N75°23′22″W / 38.69278°N 75.38944°W / 38.69278; -75.38944
Area0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Built1861 (1861)
Built bySipple, Thomas
Architectural styleGreek Revival, Italianate
NRHP reference No. 85002007 [1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 5, 1985

Thomas Sipple House, also known as the Chipman House and Boxwood Manor, is a historic home located at Georgetown, Sussex County, Delaware. It was built in 1861, and is a two-story, five bay, single pile frame dwelling with a two-story rear ell. It sits on a brick foundation and has a low-pitched gable roof. The house was modified in 1912, to enclose a rear porch, add a sleeping porch, and add a two-story porch connecting the house to two outbuildings. It features Greek Revival and Italianate style design elements. [2]

The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. Richard B. Carter (November 1984). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Thomas Sipple House". and Accompanying six photos