Thomas VanMetre House

Last updated
Thomas VanMetre House
THOMAS VanMETRE HOUSE, MARTINSBURG, BERKELEY COUNTY.jpg
USA West Virginia location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location 3093 Golf Course Rd., near Martinsburg, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°25′54.75″N77°54′5.39″W / 39.4318750°N 77.9014972°W / 39.4318750; -77.9014972 Coordinates: 39°25′54.75″N77°54′5.39″W / 39.4318750°N 77.9014972°W / 39.4318750; -77.9014972
Area 1.51 acres (0.61 ha)
Built 1838, 1847
NRHP reference # 09001189 [1]
Added to NRHP December 30, 2009

Thomas VanMetre or Vanmetre House is a historic home located near Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia, USA. It was built in 1838 and is a two-story, five bay, red brick vernacular "I"-house. It has a side gable roof and a single bay, pedimented portico supported by Doric order columns. Also on the property is summer kitchen (c. 1838). [2]

Martinsburg, West Virginia City in West Virginia, United States

Martinsburg is a city in and the county seat of Berkeley County, West Virginia, United States, in the tip of the state's Eastern Panhandle region in the lower Shenandoah Valley. Its population was 17,687 in the 2016 census estimate, making it the largest city in the Eastern Panhandle and the ninth-largest municipality in the state. Martinsburg is part of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Berkeley County, West Virginia County in the United States

Berkeley County is located in the Shenandoah Valley in the Eastern Panhandle region of West Virginia in the United States. The county is part of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Related Research Articles

Peter G. Van Winkle House

The Peter G. Van Winkle House was a historic home located in the Julia-Ann Square Historic District in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. It was built between about 1880 and 1899, and was a two-story duplex in the Queen Anne style. It featured a deck hipped roof with intersecting gables, turrets, and dormers. It was built on property once owned by former United States Senator Peter G. Van Winkle, who died in 1872.

Barboursville (James Barbour) The ruin of the mansion of former U.S. Senator, U.S. Secretary of War, and Virginia Governor James Barbour, located in Barboursville, Virginia

Barboursville is the ruin of the mansion of James Barbour, located in Barboursville, Virginia. He was the former U.S. Senator, U.S. Secretary of War, and Virginia Governor. It is now within the property of Barboursville Vineyards. The house was designed by Thomas Jefferson, president of the United States and Barbour's friend and political ally. The ruin is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

John VanMetre House West Virginia place listed on National Register of Historic Places

The John VanMetre House is a log and brick Federal-style house built in Kearneysville, Berkeley County, West Virginia around 1780, and enlarged with a log ell about 1800. Also on the property is a log smoke house, timber frame barn, and two sheds.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Carver County, Minnesota Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Carver County, Minnesota. It is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Carver County, Minnesota, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.

Kuykendall Polygonal Barn

The Kuykendall Polygonal Barn was an early 20th-century polygonal barn in the South Branch Potomac River valley near Romney in Hampshire County, West Virginia. The Kuykendall Polygonal Barn was the only 15-sided barn built in West Virginia, and one of only a few such known to have been constructed in the United States. The barn utilized a number of sophisticated technological innovations not found in West Virginia's other round and polygonal barns. The Kuykendall Polygonal Barn was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on 9 July 1985.

Fort Van Meter (Hampshire County, West Virginia)

Fort Van Meter — or Fort VanMeter — is a mid-18th century frontier fort in the South Branch Potomac River Valley about 9 miles (14 km) southwest of Romney in Hampshire County, West Virginia, USA. It is located 15 miles (24 km) northeast of Moorefield and about a mile northeast of the former community of Glebe at the northern end of the rugged river gorge known as The Trough.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Steele County, Minnesota Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Steele County, Minnesota. It is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Steele County, Minnesota, United States. The locations of National Register properties and districts for which the latitude and longitude coordinates are included below, may be seen in an online map.

Nathan VanMetre House

Nathan VanMetre House is a historic home located near Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia. It was built in 1872, and is a two-story, eight bay wide rectangular brick house with a steeply pitched gable roof, in the Greek Revival style. The main section of the house is five bays wide. Also on the property is a small brick smokehouse (1872), large bank barn (1872), garage, two silos, and chicken house.

Herman August Meyer House

Herman August Meyer House is a historic home located at Davis, Tucker County, West Virginia. It was built about 1891, and is a 2 1/2 story, "T"-shaped, 5-bay central-passage I house of wood construction. It was built as a single-family residence, and converted for use as a bed and breakfast inn. Also on the property is a domestic dependency, built about 1891.

Thomas Maslin House

Thomas Maslin House, also known as Mortimer Gamble House and Maslin-Gamble House, is a historic home located at Moorefield, Hardy County, West Virginia. It was built in 1848, and is a two-story brick dwelling with a vernacular Federal style. It features a single-bay, pedimented portico supported by paired Ionic order columns. Above the four panel entrance is a semi-elliptical fanlight. Also on the property is a contributing two story, brick servant's quarters.

Thomas R. Carskadon House historic building in West Virginia, the former residence of Thomas R. Carskadon

Thomas R. Carskadon House also known as the Carskadon Mansion and "Radical Hill," is a historic home located on Radical Hill overlooking Mineral Street, in Keyser, Mineral County, West Virginia. It is the former residence of Thomas R. Carskadon, an influential Mineral County farmer and political leader. It was built about 1886, and has two sections: a 2 1/2-story rectangular, brick main block and a two-story rear ell. It features a hip-on-mansard roof and two one-story, brick polygonal bays. It combines features of the Italianate and French Second Empire styles. Also on the property are the ruins of a brick dairy, the cement foundations of a silo, and the stone foundations of another outbuilding.

Edemar

"Edemar", also known as Stifel Fine Arts Center, is a historic house and national historic district located at Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia. The district includes two contributing buildings and two contributing structures. The main house was built between 1910 and 1914, and is a ​2 12-story, brick-and-concrete Classical Revival mansion with a steel frame. The front facade features a full-width portico with pediment supported by six Corinthian order columns. Also on the property are a contributing brick, tiled-roofed three-bay carriage barn/garage; fish pond; and formal garden. The Stifel family occupied the home until 1976, when the family gave it to the Oglebay Institute to be used as the Stifel Fine Arts Center.

Elm Hill (Wheeling, West Virginia)

Elm Hill, also known as the Campbell-Bloch House, is a historic house and national historic district located near Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia. The district includes two contributing buildings and one contributing site. The main house was built about 1850, and is a ​2 12-story, brick house with a low 2-story wing in the Greek Revival style. It has an L-shaped plan, a 3-bay entrance portico, and hipped roof with an octagonal bell-cast central cupola. The interior has a central formal hall plan. Also on the property are a contributing brick, spring house / smoke house and a small cemetery dating to about 1835.

Meldahl House West Virginia place listed on National Register of Historic Places

Meldahl House is a historic home located near Washington, Wood County, West Virginia. The house was built in the 1920s, and is a 2 1/2-story, three bay by three bay, frame American Foursquare style residence. It has a hipped roof and a central stone chimney. Also on the property is a wine cellar constructed about 1860 and a wooden gazebo. The property is associated with the once-flourishing wine and grape industry of Wood County.

Farmington (Albemarle County, Virginia) house near Charlottesville, in Albemarle County, Virginia

Farmington is a house near Charlottesville, in Albemarle County, Virginia, that was greatly expanded by a design by Thomas Jefferson that Jefferson executed while he was President of the United States. The original house was built in the mid-18th century for Francis Jerdone on a 1,753-acre (709 ha) property. Jerdone sold the land and house to George Divers, a friend of Jefferson, in 1785. In 1802, Divers asked Jefferson to design an expansion of the house. The house, since greatly enlarged, is now a clubhouse.

Finney–Lee House

Finney–Lee House is a historic home near Snow Creek, Franklin County, Virginia. It was built in 1838–1839 and is a two-story, three-bay brick dwelling. It has a gable roof and exterior end chimneys. The interior features Federal and Greek Revival design details. Also on the property are the contributing front walkway, pack house, two tobacco barns, a cemetery, and a road trace.

Aurora (Spencer, Virginia) historic home near Spencer, Patrick County, Virginia

Aurora, also known as the Pink House, Boxwood, and the Penn Homestead, is a historic home located at Penn's Store near Spencer, Patrick County, Virginia. It was built between 1853 and 1856, and is a two-story, three-bay, hipped-roof frame house in the Italian Villa style. It features one-story porches on the east and west facades, round-arched windows, clustered chimneys, and low pitched roofs. Also on the property is a contributing small one-story frame building once used as an office. It was built by Thomas Jefferson Penn (1810-1888), whose son, Frank Reid Penn founded the company F.R & G. Penn Co. that was eventually acquired by tobacco magnate James Duke to form the American Tobacco Company.

John K. Beery Farm

John K. Beery Farm is a historic home and farm complex located near Edom, Virginia, United States. The main house dates to 1838, and consists of a two-story, five bay, central-hall plan, main section with a one-story, three bay east wing. The main section measures 50 feet wide and 18 feet deep and features a long one-story, late-19th century porch. Also on the property are a number of contributing outbuildings including a stone bank barn, loom house, spring house, wash house / kitchen, granary, sheds, and an outhouse. The meeting room in the east wing of the house served a large congregation of Mennonites for a number of years.

Sutherland House (Petersburg, Virginia)

Sutherland House, also known as the Sutherland-Hite House and Logan House, is a historic home located at Petersburg, Virginia. It was built between 1860 and 1862, and is a two-story, three bay, Italianate style brick dwelling. The house incorporates an 1838, one-story, former dwelling as a rear ell, and a frame addition built in 1877. The main house has a double-pile, central passage plan. The house features two unusual chimneys made up of clustered flues on a low-hipped slate roof, tripartite windows, and a Doric order portico at the entry. Also on the property is a contributing two-story, four room brick service building.

Oakwood (Fauquier County, Virginia)

Oakwood is a historic farm property west of Warrenton in rural Fauquier County, Virginia. It is bounded on the south by Old Waterloo Road, and on the west by Great Run, a south-flowing tributary of the Rappahannock River. The main house is a rambling two-story masonry building, whose oldest portions date to the 18th century. Its present appearance has significant Greek Revival features, include a gabled temple-front portico added about 1838. The property is also notable in local culture for hosting the very first Virginia Gold Cup race in 1922.

References

  1. 1 2 "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 12/28/09 through 12/31/09. National Park Service. 2010-01-08.
  2. David L. Taylor (March 2009). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas VanMetre House" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-06-02.