Thomas de Lisle

Last updated
Thomas de Lisle
Bishop of Ely
Elected 15 July 1345
Term ended 23 June 1361
Predecessor Simon Montacute
Successor Simon Langham
Orders
Consecration July 1345
Personal details
Born c. 1298
Died 23 June 1361
Denomination Catholic

Thomas de Lisle (c. 1298–1361) was a medieval Bishop of Ely.

Circa – frequently abbreviated c., ca., or ca, and less frequently circ. or cca. – signifies "approximately" in several European languages and as a loanword in English, usually in reference to a date. Circa is widely used in historical writing when the dates of events are not accurately known.

Bishop of Ely Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Ely is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Ely in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese roughly covers the county of Cambridgeshire, together with a section of north-west Norfolk and has its episcopal see in the City of Ely, Cambridgeshire, where the seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity. The current bishop is Stephen Conway, who signs +Stephen Elien:. The diocesan bishops resided at the Bishop's Palace, Ely until 1941; they now reside in Bishop's House, the former cathedral deanery. Conway became Bishop of Ely in 2010, translated from the Diocese of Salisbury where he was Bishop suffragan of Ramsbury.

Contents

Lisle was elected to Ely on 15 July 1345 and consecrated in July 1345. He had his servants burn down some of the houses belonging to Blanche of Lancaster. He was rebuked by Edward III and ordered to pay damages, but after that he had her servant William Holm murdered in 1355. Edward then confiscated Lisle's possessions and made him beg for forgiveness. [1]

Blanche of Lancaster, Baroness Wake of Liddell was an English noblewoman. She was the eldest daughter of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster and Maud Chaworth. Blanche was named after her grandmother, Blanche of Artois, who had ruled Navarre as regent.

Lisle died on 23 June 1361. [2]

Citations

  1. Mortimer, Ian (2008). The Perfect King. The Life of Edward III, Father of the English Nation. Vintage. p. 318.
  2. Fryde, et al.Handbook of British Chronology p. 244

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References

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Further reading

Roy Martin Haines, was a British historian.

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Simon Montacute
Bishop of Ely
1345–1361
Succeeded by
Simon Langham