Thomasia pygmaea

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Tiny thomasia
Thomasia pygmaea.jpg
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Malvales
Family: Malvaceae
Genus: Thomasia
Species:
T. pygmaea
Binomial name
Thomasia pygmaea
Synonyms

Asterochiton pygmaeusTurcz.

Thomasia pygmaea, commonly known as the tiny thomasia, [2] is a small shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia.

Western Australia State in Australia

Western Australia is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west, and the Southern Ocean to the south, the Northern Territory to the north-east, and South Australia to the south-east. Western Australia is Australia's largest state, with a total land area of 2,529,875 square kilometres, and the second-largest country subdivision in the world, surpassed only by Russia's Sakha Republic. The state has about 2.6 million inhabitants – around 11 percent of the national total – of whom the vast majority live in the south-west corner, 79 per cent of the population living in the Perth area, leaving the remainder of the state sparsely populated.

Contents

Description

It grows to between 0.05 and 0.3 metres in height. [3] Flowers are produced between August and November in its native range. [3] These are pinkish-mauve and covered with small red dots. [4]

Taxonomy and naming

The species was first formally described by botanist Nicolai Stepanovitch Turczaninow in Bulletin de la Societe Imperiale des Naturalistes de Moscou in 1806. [5] He gave it the name Asterochiton pygmaeus . [5] George Bentham transferred the species to the genus Thomasia in 1863. [5]

George Bentham British botanist

George Bentham was an English botanist, described by the weed botanist Duane Isely as "the premier systematic botanist of the nineteenth century".

<i>Thomasia</i> genus of plants

Thomasia is a genus of plants which are native to southern Australia.

Cultivation

Thomasia pygmaea is an attractive small shrub, useful for edging, container growing or in rockeries. [4] It requires a light soil with good drainage and tolerates some shade and light frost. [4]

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<i>Thomasia tenuivestita</i> species of plant

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<i>Lasiopetalum</i> genus of plants

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<i>Myoporum insulare</i> species of plant

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<i>Acacia myrtifolia</i> species of plant

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<i>Thomasia sarotes</i> species of plant

Thomasia sarotes is a shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia.

<i>Thomasia quercifolia</i> species of plant

Thomasia quercifolia, the oak-leaf thomasia, is a shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia.

<i>Thomasia grandiflora</i> species of plant

Thomasia grandiflora, commonly known as large-flowered thomasia, is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. The flowers are pinkish-purple with a papery appearance hanging in pendents from the leaf axils. The calyx lobes are prominent and larger than the petals.

<i>Darwinia meeboldii</i> species of plant

Darwinia meeboldii, the Cranbrook bell, is a shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It has an erect and straggly habit, growing to between 0.5 and 3 metres high. The bracts around the flowers form a pendent "bell" which is usually white with red tips. A group of 8 small flowers are concealed inside. These are primarily produced between August and November.

<i>Hakea undulata</i> species of plant

Hakea undulata, commonly known as wavy-leaved hakea, is a shrub that is native to the south-west of Western Australia. It has stiff wavy leaves and fragrant cream-white flowers from mid-winter to October.

T. grandiflora may refer to:

<i>Lysiosepalum involucratum</i> species of plant

Lysiosepalum involucratum is a small shrub species in the family Malvaceae. It is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. Plants grow to between 0.3 and 1.5 metres high, and produce mauve flowers between August and November in the species' native range.

<i>Persoonia falcata</i> species of plant

Persoonia falcata, commonly known as the wild pear, is a shrub native to northern Australia.

<i>Thomasia purpurea</i> species of plant

Thomasia purpurea is a small shrub that is endemic to the southwest of Western Australia. It usually grows to between 0.3 and 1.2 metres in height. Pink to purple flowers are produced between April and December in the species' native range.

<i>Thomasia macrocarpa</i> species of plant

Thomasia macrocarpa, commonly known as large-fruited thomasia, is a shrub that is endemic to the southwest of Western Australia.

<i>Hakea mitchellii</i> species of plant

Hakea mitchellii, commonly known as desert hakea, is a shrub species in the family Proteaceae.

<i>Thomasia solanacea</i> species of plant

Thomasia solanacea is a small shrub which is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia.

Acacia pygmaea is a shrub of the genus Acacia and the subgenus Phyllodineae. It is native to a small area in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia.

Baeckea pygmaea is a shrub found along the south coast Western Australia.

Thomasia angustifolia, commonly known as narrow-leaved thomasia, is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. The flowers are pinkish-purple, bell-shaped and hang in pendents from the leaf axils.

References

  1. "Thomasia pygmaea". Australian Plant Census. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  2. "Thomasia pygmaea". Australian Native Plant Society. Retrieved 8 October 2019.
  3. 1 2 "Thomasia pygmaea". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  4. 1 2 3 Greig, D. (1987). The Australian Gardener's Wildflower Catalogue. Australia: Angus & Robertson. ISBN   0207154600.
  5. 1 2 3 "Thomasia pygmaea". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government.