Thorneycroft carbine

Last updated
Thornycroft carbine
Thorneycroft carbine, patent 14622 of July 18, 1901.png
Drawings from original patent
Type Bullpup bolt-action rifle
Place of originUnited Kingdom
Production history
Designed1901
Specifications
Cartridge .303 British
Action Bolt-action
Feed system5-round internal magazine loaded with 5-round charger clips
Sights Iron sights

The Thorneycroft carbine was one of the earliest bullpup rifles, developed by an English gunsmith in 1901 as patent No. 14,622 of July 18, 1901. This bolt-action rifle featured a bullpup action in which the retracted bolt slid back through the stock nearly to the shooter's shoulder, maximising the space available in the body of the firearm. The rifle was chambered in the contemporary .303 British service cartridge, and held five rounds in an internal magazine.

Bullpup firearm with its action and magazine in its buttstock

A bullpup is a firearm with its action and magazine behind the trigger. This creates shorter weapons in comparison to rifles with the same size of gun barrel. This means the advantages of a longer barrel such as muzzle velocity and accuracy are retained while reducing the overall size and weight of the weapon.

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Bolt action is a type of firearm action where the handling of cartridges into and out of the weapon's barrel chamber is operated by manually manipulating the bolt directly via a handle, which is most commonly placed on the right-hand side of the weapon. When the handle is operated, the bolt is unlocked from the receiver and pulled back to open the breech, allowing the spent cartridge case to be extracted and ejected, the firing pin within the bolt is cocked and engages the sear, then upon the bolt being pushed back a new cartridge is loaded into the chamber, and finally the breech is closed tight by the bolt locking against the receiver.

Contents

The Thorneycroft was 7.5 in (190 mm) shorter and 10% lighter than the standard Lee–Enfield rifle used by the British military at the time. However, when tested at Hythe the firearm exhibited excessive recoil and poor ergonomics, and was not adopted for military service.

Hythe, Kent town in Kent, England

Hythe is a coastal market town on the edge of Romney Marsh, in the district of Folkestone and Hythe on the south coast of Kent. The word Hythe or Hithe is an Old English word meaning haven or landing place.

See also

Sources


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