Those Days (song)

Last updated
"Those Days"
Single by Shaggy featuring Na'sha
from the album Intoxication
Released Flag of Poland.svg October 2007 Radio Promo
Recorded2007
Genre Reggae
Length3:23
Songwriter(s) Shaggy, Christopher Birch, Eugene Raskin
Shaggy featuring Na'sha singles chronology
"Church Heathen"
(2007)
"Those Days"
(2007)
"Bonafide Girl feat. Ricardo "RikRok" Ducent & Tony Gold"
(2008)

"Those Days" is the fourth track from Shaggy's album, Intoxication (2007).

Charts

Chart (2004)Peak
position
Radio Eska Chart1


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