Thout

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Thout (Coptic : Ⲑⲱⲟⲩⲧ, [tʰoːuːt] ), also known as Thoth (Greek : Θωθ, Thōth) and Tut [1] (Arabic : توت), is the first month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lies between 11 September and 10 October of the Gregorian calendar. The month of Thout is also the first month of the Season of Akhet (Inundation) in Ancient Egypt, when the Nile floods historically covered the land of Egypt; it has not done so since the construction of the High Dam at Aswan.

Contents

Name

The name of the month comes from Thoth, the Ancient Egyptian God of Wisdom and Science, inventor of writing, patron of scribes, and "he who designates the seasons, months, and years." Thoth presided over the "House of Life," which were composed and copied all texts necessary for the maintenance and replenishment of life.

Coptic Synaxarium of the month of Thout

CopticJulianGregorianCommemorations
Thout

1

August

29

September

11

23012
33113
  • Assembly of the Holy Synod at Alexandria under St. Dionysius, the 14th Pope of Alexandria, in 243 AD.
  • Great Earthquake in Cairo and Most of the Egyptian Cities in the year 1112 AD.
4September

1

14
5215
  • Martyrdom of St. Sophia
6316
  • Departure of Isaiah, the Prophet.
  • Martyrdom of St. Basilissa
7417
  • Departure of St. Dioscorus, the 25th Pope of Alexandria.
  • Departure of St. Severian, bishop of Gabala in Syria
  • Martyrdom of St. Rebecca and her children Saints Agathon, Peter, John, Amun, & Amuna
8518
  • Departure of Moses, the Prophet.
  • Martyrdom of Zacharias, the Prophet.
  • Martyrdom of St. Diomedes (Dimides).
9619
10720
  • Martyrdom of St. Matruna
  • Commemoration of St. Basin and her Children
11821
12922
131023
141124
  • Departure of St. Agathon the Stylite
151225
  • Translocation of the Body of St. Stephen, the Archdeacon.
  • Commemoration of St. Leontius of Syria
161326
171427
  • Appearance of the Holy Cross
  • Departure of St. Theognosta
181528
  • Second day of the Holy Cross Feast
  • Martyrdom of St. Porphyrius (Prophorius).
  • Martyrdom of St. Stephen the Priest & St. Niceta (Niketa)
191629
201730
  • Departure of St. Athanasius II, the 28th Pope of Alexandria.
  • Departure of St. Theopista
  • Martyrdom of St. Melitina the Virgin
2118October

1

22192
  • Martyrdom of Saints Cotylas (Kobtlas), his sister Axoua, and his friend Tatas
  • Martyrdom of St. Julius of Aqfahs (El-Akfehasi), the Writer of the Biography of Martyrs
23203
24214
25225
26236
27247
  • Martyrdom of St. Eustathius and his two Sons
28258
  • Martyrdom of St. Apater (Abadir) and his sister Saint Herai (Eraee)
29269
  • Martyrdom of St. Rhipsime (Arbsima) the Virgin, St. Gaiana, and her Sisters the Virgins
302710

See also

Related Research Articles

Thoth Ancient Egyptian deity

Thoth is an ancient Egyptian deity. In art, he was often depicted as a man with the head of an ibis or a baboon, animals sacred to him. His feminine counterpart was Seshat, and his wife was Ma'at. He was the god of wisdom, writing, hieroglyphs, science, magic, art, judgment, and the dead.

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Paopi, also known as Phaophi and Babah, is the second month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lasts between 11 October and 9 November of the Gregorian calendar, unless the previous Coptic year was a leap year. The month of Paopi is the second month of the Season of Akhet (Inundation) in Ancient Egypt, when the Nile floods inundated the land.

Hathor, also known as Athyr and Hatur, is the third month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lies between November 10 and December 9 of the Gregorian calendar. The month of Hathor is also the third month of the season of Akhet (Inundation) in Ancient Egypt, when the Nile floods historically covered the land of Egypt; they have not done so since the construction of the High Dam at Aswan.

Koiak, also known as Choiak and Kiyahk, is the fourth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lasts between 10 December and 8 January of the Gregorian calendar, or between 11 December and 9 January of the Gregorian calendar in Coptic calendar years immediately following a Coptic calendar leap year. The month of Koiak is also the fourth month of the Season of Akhet (Inundation) in Ancient Egypt, when the Nile floods historically covered the land. They have not done so since the construction of the High Dam at Aswan.

Tobi, also known as Tybi and Tubah, is the fifth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lies between January 9 and February 7 of the Gregorian calendar. The month of Tobi is also the first month of the season of Proyet in Ancient Egypt, where the Nile floods recede and the crops start to grow throughout the land of Egypt.

Meshir, also known as Mechir and Amshir, is the sixth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lies between February 8 and March 9 of the Gregorian calendar. The month of Meshir is also the second month of the Season of Proyet in ancient Egypt, where the Nile floods recede and the crops start to grow throughout the land of Egypt.

Paremhat, also known as Phamenoth and Baramhat, is the seventh month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lies between March 10 and April 8 of the Gregorian calendar. Paremhat is also the third month of the Season of Proyet in Ancient Egypt, where the Nile floods recede and the crops start to grow throughout the land of Egypt.

Parmouti, also known as Pharmouthi and Barmudah (برموده), is the eighth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lasts between April 9 and May 8 of the Gregorian calendar. Paremoude was also the fourth month of the season of Proyet in Ancient Egypt, when the Nile floods recede and the crops start to grow throughout the land.

Pashons

Pashons, also known as Pachon and Bachans, is the ninth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lasts between May 9 and June 7 of the Gregorian calendar. The month of Pashons is also the first month of the Season of Shemu (Harvest) in Ancient Egypt, when the Egyptians harvest their crops throughout the land.

Paoni, also known as Payni and Ba'unah, is the tenth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lasts between June 8 and July 7 of the Gregorian calendar. Paoni is also the second month of the Season of Shemu (Harvest) in Ancient Egypt, where the Egyptians harvest their crops throughout the land.

Epip, also known as Epiphi and Abib, is the eleventh month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It lasts between July 8 and August 6 of the Gregorian calendar. The month of Epip is also the third month of the Season of Shemu (Harvest) in Ancient Egypt, where the Egyptians harvest their crops throughout the land.

Mesori is the twelfth month of the ancient Egyptian and Coptic calendars. It is identical to Nahase in the Ethiopian calendar.

The intercalary month or epagomenal days of the ancient Egyptian, Coptic, and Ethiopian calendars are a period of five days in common years and six days in leap years in addition to those calendars' 12 standard months, sometimes reckoned as their thirteenth month. They originated as a periodic measure to ensure that the heliacal rising of Sirius would occur in the 12th month of the Egyptian lunar calendar but became a regular feature of the civil calendar and its descendants. Coptic and Ethiopian leap days occur in the year preceding Gregorian leap years.

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Nayrouz

Nayrouz or Neyrouz is a feast when martyrs and confessors are commemorated within the Coptic Orthodox Church. Celebrated on September 11, the day is both the start of the Coptic new year and its first month, Thout.

References

Citations

  1. Gabra, Gawdat (2008), "Coptic Calendar", The A to Z of the Coptic Church, A to Z Guide Series, No. 107, Plymouth: The Scarecrow Press, pp.  70–1 .

Bibliography

Preceded by
Intercalary Month
Coptic calendar
days: 30 days
Succeeded by
Paopi