Three-coloured harlequin toad

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Three-coloured harlequin toad
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Bufonidae
Genus: Atelopus
Species:
A. tricolor
Binomial name
Atelopus tricolor
Boulenger, 1902
Synonyms
  • Atelopus rugulosus Noble, 1921
  • Atelopus willimani Donoso-Barros, 1969

The three-coloured harlequin toad (Atelopus tricolor) is a species of toad in the family Bufonidae. It is found in Bolivia and Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist montane forests and rivers. It is threatened by habitat loss.

Contents

Characteristics

They have slim body; head is longer than broad; snout acuminate; nostril lateral not visible from above; eye width is about the same length as distance from nostril to anterior corner of eye. Loreal area barely convex; upper lip fleshy; immediate lateral postorbital are convex; temporal area slightly convex; tympanum absent; dorsal postorbital crest developed but not prominent. Tibia long; foot shorter than tibia; relative length of toes: 1<2<3<5<4; metatarsal tubercles poorly developed. [1]

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References

  1. Lötters, Stefan; De la Riva, Ignacio (1998). "Redescription of Atelopus tricolor Boulenger from Southeastern Peru and Adjacent Bolivia, with Comments on Related Forms". Journal of Herpetology. 32 (4): 481–488. doi:10.2307/1565201. ISSN   0022-1511. JSTOR   1565201.

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