Three Gays of the Condo

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"Three Gays of the Condo"
The Simpsons episode
Episode no.Season 14
Episode 17
Directed by Mark Kirkland
Written by Matt Warburton
Production codeEABF12
Original air dateApril 13, 2003
Guest appearance(s)
Episode features
Couch gag The family (depicted as frozen food) is put in a deep-fryer, taken out, dumped in a basket, and salted
Commentary Al Jean
Matt Warburton
Ian Maxtone-Graham
Matt Selman
Carolyn Omine
Yeardley Smith
Scott Thompson
"Weird Al" Yankovic
Mark Kirkland
David Silverman
Episode chronology
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"'Scuse Me While I Miss the Sky"
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"Dude, Where's My Ranch?"
The Simpsons (season 14)
List of The Simpsons episodes

"Three Gays of the Condo" is the seventeenth episode of the fourteenth season of The Simpsons . It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on April 13, 2003. The episode was written by Matt Warburton and directed by Mark Kirkland. The title is a pun on the 1975 film Three Days of the Condor . In the episode Homer finds out that while dating, Marge did not enjoy going to Moe's Tavern while Homer got drunk. Homer notices two days later that Marge is pregnant with Bart, so he thinks that is why she stayed with him. Upset, Homer moves in with two gay guys, Grady and Julio.

"Three Gays of the Condo" was The Simpsons' second episode to revolve entirely on homosexuality, after "Homer's Phobia" in 1997, and just like the predecessor, the episode received largely positive reviews from both the critics and the LGBT community, praised for its smart comedy. The episode won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program, just as "Homer's Phobia" did in 1997.

Plot

The family is creating an enormous jigsaw puzzle. After they realize a jigsaw piece is missing, the family look for it. Homer looks through Marge's memory box and sees a poster of Moe's Tavern's opening (advertised as Meaux's Tavern) with Marge's writing on it. It says that Homer made the opening the worst day of her life because due to him becoming drunk and ditching her to play Asteroids on an arcade machine with his friends, after which he was sent to the hospital with alcohol poisoning. This leaves Homer concerned why Marge stayed with him; he then finds a hospital appointment card dated two days later, confirming she was pregnant with Bart. When Homer confronts Marge about the letter, she says she was just upset that night, but is forced to admit that Homer did, and still does, things which annoy her. Homer then realizes Marge has been resenting him behind his back. The next day, they argue again and Homer leaves the house. He spends some time at Kirk Van Houten's apartment, but the generally depressive mood of the apartment complex where he lives drives him out. Homer then reads a newspaper saying that there is a place available. Finding out that the place is in Springfield's gay district, Homer moves in with a gay male couple, Grady and Julio. Homer has a visit home after taking Bart and Lisa out, but Marge and Homer still argue. At the gay bar, Homer tells Grady and Julio that his relationship with Marge is low.

The next day, Homer sees Marge and the kids, who have brought "Weird Al" Yankovic and his band, who play a song called "Homer and Marge", a parody of John Mellencamp's "Jack & Diane", to tell Homer that Marge loves him. Marge then asks Homer out on a date, but he is nervous while preparing for his date and drinks too much margarita. Meanwhile, at the venue of the date, Marge anxiously awaits Homer's arrival. When he arrives, she is upset that he is late and drunk, and leaves him. Back at the apartment, Grady tries to comfort Homer by telling him that he will find someone else, and kisses him romantically. Homer realises that Grady is in love with him and jumps out of the window, heading to Moe's Tavern to get some advice from Moe. Homer is about to come to the realisation that all of his problems are caused by alcohol when Moe forces beer down Homer's throat, giving him alcohol poisoning.

After Homer awakens, Dr. Hibbert tells him that the incident was not as bad as the night he first treated him for alcohol poisoning. Homer says it was the night that destroyed his marriage. Hibbert disagrees and plays a tape from the past of Homer's first alcohol poisoning. Marge says that she loves him in the tape. Marge appears and says she still does and they reconcile.

Years later, an elderly Dr. Hibbert is watching the tape and remarks that he made tapes because he suspected a nurse of stealing sponges. Then for the first time he sees footage of the nurse sneaking past the hidden security-camera while gathering up a huge armful of sponges.

Production

"Weird Al" (pictured) guest-starred as himself AlYankovicByKristineSlipson.jpg
"Weird Al" (pictured) guest-starred as himself

The character Grady is voiced by the openly gay comedian/actor Scott Thompson, most famous for being a member of the Canadian sketch comedy troupe The Kids in the Hall. "Weird Al" Yankovic has said that he was called in a week before the episode aired to re-record a line sung in the ending credits. The original line was "Oh yeah, we've got time to fill; why don't you go pee before King of the Hill ?" However, prior to the airing, it was found that King Of The Hill was moved earlier and that the time slot after The Simpsons was taken by the new show Oliver Beene . The new line was sung as "Oh yeah, 'Weird Al' had fun on this show; even if it was just a brief cameo". The closing scene with Dr Hibbert watching the tapes and saying 'all I have now are my tapes', is an allusion to Samuel Beckett's play Krapp's Last Tape, of which the central theme is an old man recalling his history by playing audiotapes.

Harvey Fierstein was asked to reprise his role as Karl from the season two episode "Simpson and Delilah" in a cameo appearance. In the script, Homer was thrown out of the house by Marge, and encountered Karl. The purpose of the appearance was to introduce a gay couple that Homer would live with. Fierstein however felt that "the script was a lot of very clever gay jokes, and there just wasn't that Simpsons twist" and turned the role down. [1]

Reception

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References

  1. Ortved, John (2009). The Simpsons: An Uncensored, Unauthorized History. Greystone Books. pp. 248–250. ISBN   978-1-55365-503-9.
  2. "Emmy Awards: 2003" . Retrieved 2007-08-08.