Three Little Words (song)

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"Three Little Words" is a popular song with music by Harry Ruby and lyrics by Bert Kalmar, published in 1930.

The Rhythm Boys (including Bing Crosby), accompanied by the Duke Ellington orchestra, recorded it on August 26, 1930 [1] and it enjoyed great success. [2] Their version was used in the 1930 Amos 'n' Andy film Check and Double Check, with orchestra members miming to it. The film was co-written by Kalmar and Ruby along with J. Walter Ruben. The song also figured prominently in the film Three Little Words , a 1950 biopic about Kalmar and Ruby.

Other recordings

In the mid-1970s the Advertising Council used a fully orchestrated instrumental version of the song in a series of PSAs about seat belt safety; the tag line of these spots was "Seat belts: a nice way to say 'I Love You'."

Between 1977 and 2002, the channel Saeta TV (Channel 10) from Montevideo, Uruguay had it as a musical curtain for the humor program "Decalegrón" (English: Ten Big Joy) [10]

Actress Judith Roberts sang the song in Woody Allen's 1980 film Stardust Memories .

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References

  1. "A Bing Crosby Discography". BING magazine. International Club Crosby. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  2. Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954 . Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p.  147. ISBN   0-89820-083-0.
  3. Whitburn, Joel (1986). Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954 . Wisconsin, USA: Record Research Inc. p.  596. ISBN   0-89820-083-0.
  4. "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  5. Al Hirt, He's the King and His Band Retrieved April 6, 2013.
  6. "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  7. "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  8. "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  9. "Discogs.com". Discogs.com. Retrieved April 25, 2017.
  10. SAETA TV, Canal 10. "Tributo a Decalegrón (Tribute to Ten Big Joy)". Esteban Martínez on YouTube (in Spanish). SAETA TV. Retrieved 20 April 2019.