Thryptomene denticulata

Last updated

Thryptomene denticulata
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Thryptomene
Species:
T. denticulata
Binomial name
Thryptomene denticulata

Thryptomene denticulata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia. [1]

Myrtaceae family of plants

Myrtaceae or the myrtle family is a family of dicotyledonous plants placed within the order Myrtales. Myrtle, pohutukawa, bay rum tree, clove, guava, acca (feijoa), allspice, and eucalyptus are some notable members of this group. All species are woody, contain essential oils, and have flower parts in multiples of four or five. The leaves are evergreen, alternate to mostly opposite, simple, and usually entire. The flowers have a base number of five petals, though in several genera the petals are minute or absent. The stamens are usually very conspicuous, brightly coloured and numerous.

The erect shrub typically grows to a height of 0.4 to 1.5 metres (1 to 5 ft) in height. It blooms between May and November producing purple-pink flowers. It generally grows to a width of about 1 metre (3 ft) and has tiny leaves. [2]

It is found on sand plains in the Mid West, Gascoyne and Wheatbelt regions of Western Australia between Shark Bay and Wongan Hills where it grows in sandy soils. [1]

Mid West (Western Australia) Region in Western Australia

The Mid West region is one of the nine regions of Western Australia. It is a sparsely populated region extending from the west coast of Western Australia, about 200 kilometres (120 mi) north and south of its administrative centre of Geraldton and inland to 450 kilometres (280 mi) east of Wiluna in the Gibson Desert.

Gascoyne region of Western Australia

The Gascoyne region is one of the nine administrative regions of Western Australia. It is located in the north west of Western Australia, and consists of the local government areas of Carnarvon, Exmouth, Shark Bay and Upper Gascoyne. The Gascoyne has about 600 km (370 mi) of Indian Ocean coastline; extends inland about 500 km (310 mi); and has an area of 138,000 km2 (53,000 sq mi), including islands.

Wheatbelt (Western Australia) region in Western Australia

The Wheatbelt is one of nine regions of Western Australia defined as administrative areas for the state's regional development, and a vernacular term for the area converted to agriculture during colonisation. It partially surrounds the Perth metropolitan area, extending north from Perth to the Mid West region, and east to the Goldfields-Esperance region. It is bordered to the south by the South West and Great Southern regions, and to the west by the Indian Ocean, the Perth metropolitan area, and the Peel region. Altogether, it has an area of 154,862 square kilometres (59,793 sq mi).

The plant is quite drought tolerant once it has become established. It will grow well in full sun or in part shade. The leaves can be eaten by caterpillars and the plant has a lifespan of five to ten years. [2]

Drought extended period when a region notes a deficiency in its water supply

A drought or drouth is a natural disaster of below-average precipitation in a given region, resulting in prolonged shortages in the water supply, whether atmospheric, surface water or ground water. A drought can last for months or years, or may be declared after as few as 15 days. It can have a substantial impact on the ecosystem and agriculture of the affected region and harm to the local economy. Annual dry seasons in the tropics significantly increase the chances of a drought developing and subsequent bush fires. Periods of heat can significantly worsen drought conditions by hastening evaporation of water vapour.

Caterpillar Larva of a butterfly

Caterpillars are the larval stage of members of the order Lepidoptera.

The species was initially described as Scholtzia denticulata in 1864 by the botanist Ferdinand von Mueller in the work Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae and in 1867 was reclassified into the genus Thryptomene by George Bentham in the work Orders XLVIII. Myrtaceae- LXII. Compositae. Flora Australiensis. [3]

George Bentham British botanist

George Bentham was an English botanist, described by the weed botanist Duane Isely as "the premier systematic botanist of the nineteenth century".

Related Research Articles

Thryptomene hexandra is a shrub in the family Myrtaceae, endemic to Australia.

Thryptomene australis, commonly known as hook-leaf thryptomene, is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene biseriata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene costata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene cuspidata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene decussata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene duplicata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene elliottii is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene eremaea is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene johnsonii is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene kochii is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene mucronulata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene naviculata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene nealensis is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene racemulosa is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene stenophylla is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene striata is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene strongylophylla is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene urceolaris is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

Thryptomene wittweri is a shrub species in the family Myrtaceae that is endemic to Western Australia.

References

  1. 1 2 "Thryptomene denticulata". FloraBase . Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife.
  2. 1 2 "Thryptomene Thryptomene denticulata" (PDF). Native Plant Notes. Kings Park & Botanic Garden. Retrieved 18 April 2017.
  3. "Thryptomene denticulata (F.Muell.) Benth". Atlas of Living Australia. Global Biodiversity Information Facility. Retrieved 18 April 2017.