Thryptomene oligandra

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Thryptomene oligandra
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Rosids
Order: Myrtales
Family: Myrtaceae
Genus: Thryptomene
Species:
T. oligandra
Binomial name
Thryptomene oligandra

Thryptomene oligandra is a plant in the family Myrtaceae. [1]

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References

  1. "Thryptomene oligandra". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 23 April 2013.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)