Thumb index

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A dictionary with thumb indexes (on the right). Blacks-Law-Dictionary.jpg
A dictionary with thumb indexes (on the right).

A thumb index, also called a cut-in index [1] or an index notch [2] , is a round cut-out in the pages of dictionaries, encyclopedias, Bibles and other large religious books, and various sectioned, often alphabetic, reference works, used to locate entries starting at a particular letter or section. The individual notches are called thumb cuts.

Several ways to achieve this indexing effect were invented and [3] , a printing engineer in New York.

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The tambourine is a musical instrument in the percussion family consisting of a frame, often of wood or plastic, with pairs of small metal jingles, called "zills". Classically the term tambourine denotes an instrument with a drumhead, though some variants may not have a head at all. Tambourines are often used with regular percussion sets. They can be mounted, for example on a stand as part of a drum kit, or they can be held in the hand and played by tapping or hitting the instrument.

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A tally stick was an ancient memory aid device used to record and document numbers, quantities, or even messages. Tally sticks first appear as animal bones carved with notches during the Upper Palaeolithic; a notable example is the Ishango Bone. Historical reference is made by Pliny the Elder about the best wood to use for tallies, and by Marco Polo (1254–1324) who mentions the use of the tally in China. Tallies have been used for numerous purposes such as messaging and scheduling, and especially in financial and legal transactions, to the point of being currency.

An edge index is a form of index that consists of marks on the edges of the pages of a printed work. These marks are step-like printed and usually contain order words, letters, or numbers,. Usually, they are colored and help to find desired points, especially in reference works. They are created by printing to the edge of the sheet so that they are visible on the closed books' edge.

References

  1. "thumb index". Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books: A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology. Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation. Retrieved 8 May 2012.
  2. Popular Mechanics, September 1956, page 184, (web link)
  3. patented in the 1970's by Arthur S. Friedman