Thyrocopa sapindiella

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Thyrocopa sapindiella
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Xyloryctidae
Genus: Thyrocopa
Species:T. sapindiella
Binomial name
Thyrocopa sapindiella
Swezey, 1913

Thyrocopa sapindiella, the Oahu aulu thyrocopa moth, is a moth of the family Xyloryctidae. It was first described by Otto Swezey in 1913. It is endemic to the Hawaiian island of Oahu. It may be extinct.

Moth Group of mostly-nocturnal insects in the order Lepidoptera

Moths comprise a group of insects related to butterflies, belonging to the order Lepidoptera. Most lepidopterans are moths, and there are thought to be approximately 160,000 species of moth, many of which have yet to be described. Most species of moth are nocturnal, but there are also crepuscular and diurnal species.

Xyloryctidae family of insects

Xyloryctidae is a family of moths contained within the superfamily Gelechioidea described by Edward Meyrick in 1890. Most genera are found in the Indo-Australian region. While many of these moths are tiny, some members of the family grow to a wingspan of up to 66 mm, making them giants among the micromoths.

Oahu The third-largest of the Hawaiian Islands and site of the state capital Honolulu

Oʻahu, known as "The Gathering Place", is the third-largest of the Hawaiian Islands. It is home to roughly one million people—about two-thirds of the population of the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi. The state capital, Honolulu, is on Oʻahu's southeast coast. Including small associated islands such as Ford Island and the islands in Kāneʻohe Bay and off the eastern (windward) coast, its area is 596.7 square miles (1,545.4 km2), making it the 20th-largest island in the United States.

The length of the forewings is about 9 mm. Adults are on wing at least in November. The ground color of the forewings is very light whitish brown, with a few brown scales scattered throughout. The discal area has one very small, faint brownish spot in the cell. The hindwings are very light whitish brown.

Larvae have been recorded feeding on Abutilon species and the leaves of Sapindus species. Caterpillars are quite numerous on some trees. Early instars feed on the under surface of leaves, each producing a web covered with frass under which it feeds, eating the surface of the leaf. Later instars hide in leaves rolled together, often several leaves in a bunch fastened together, and there may be two or more caterpillars per bunch, each in a silken tunnel. Early instars are yellowish or pale green. Full-grown larvae are about 30 mm and pale yellowish with pale brown markings.

<i>Abutilon</i> genus of plants

Abutilon is a large genus of flowering plants in the mallow family, Malvaceae. It is distributed throughout the tropics and subtropics of the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Australia. General common names include Indian mallow and velvetleaf; ornamental varieties may be known as room maple, parlor maple, or flowering maple. The genus name is an 18th-century New Latin word that came from the Arabic ’abū-ṭīlūn, the name given by Avicenna to this or a similar genus.

<i>Sapindus</i> genus of plants

Sapindus is a genus of about five to twelve species of shrubs and small trees in the Lychee family, Sapindaceae, native to warm temperate to tropical regions in both the Old World and New World. The genus includes both deciduous and evergreen species. Members of the genus are commonly known as soapberries or soapnuts because the fruit pulp is used to make soap. The generic name is derived from the Latin words sapo, meaning "soap", and indicus, meaning "of India".

Instar

An instar is a developmental stage of arthropods, such as insects, between each moult (ecdysis), until sexual maturity is reached. Arthropods must shed the exoskeleton in order to grow or assume a new form. Differences between instars can often be seen in altered body proportions, colors, patterns, changes in the number of body segments or head width. After moulting, i.e. shedding their exoskeleton, the juvenile arthropods continue in their life cycle until they either pupate or moult again. The instar period of growth is fixed; however, in some insects, like the salvinia stem-borer moth, the number of instars depends on early larval nutrition. Some arthropods can continue to moult after sexual maturity, but the stages between these subsequent moults are generally not called instars.

The pupa is about 9 mm and medium brown. The pupa is formed within the spun-together leaves where the caterpillar fed.

Elwood Curtin Zimmerman was an American entomologist best known for his two multivolume series: Insects of Hawaii published by the University of Hawaiʻi Press and Australian Weevils published by Australia's CSIRO.


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