Timeline of Asheville, North Carolina

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Asheville, North Carolina, USA.

Contents

Prior to 20th century

20th century

21st century

See also

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Buncombe County, North Carolina</span> County in North Carolina, United States

Buncombe County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. It is classified within Western North Carolina. The 2020 census reported the population was 269,452. Its county seat is Asheville. Buncombe County is part of the Asheville, NC Metropolitan Statistical Area.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Asheville, North Carolina</span> City in North Carolina, United States

Asheville is a city in, and the county seat of, Buncombe County, North Carolina. Located at the confluence of the French Broad and Swannanoa rivers, it is the largest city in Western North Carolina, and the state's 11th-most populous city. According to the 2020 census, the city's population was 94,589, up from 83,393 in the 2010 census. It is the principal city in the four-county Asheville metropolitan area, which had a population of 424,858 in 2010, and of 469,015 in 2020.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Weaverville, North Carolina</span> Town in North Carolina, United States

Weaverville is a town in Buncombe County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 3,120 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Asheville Metropolitan Statistical Area.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Asheville–Buncombe Technical Community College</span> Public community college in Asheville, North Carolina, United States

Asheville–Buncombe Technical Community College is a public community college in Asheville, North Carolina. Established in 1959, the college is one of the oldest in the North Carolina Community College System and serves Buncombe and Madison counties across five different campuses, although students from anywhere may enroll. As of the 2014–15 school year, the curriculum enrollment was 10,070 and continuing education enrollment was 14,053 students. As of 2019–20, the college is the seventh largest in the North Carolina system and the largest in Western North Carolina. A-B Tech offers more than 120 degrees, diplomas, and certificates.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lillian Exum Clement</span> American politician

Lillian Exum Clement, later known as Lillian Stafford, was an American politician who was the first woman elected to the North Carolina General Assembly and the first woman to serve in any state legislature in the Southern United States.

Richard Sharp Smith was an English-born American architect, associated with Biltmore Estate and Asheville, North Carolina. Clay Griffith with the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office says, "The influence of Richard Sharp Smith’s architecture in Asheville and western North Carolina during the first quarter of the twentieth century cannot be overstated." His vernacular style combines elements of Craftsman, Colonial Revival, English cottage, Shingle, and Tudor Revival architectural styles. He is associated with some of America's important architectural firms of the late 19th century—Richard Morris Hunt, Bradford Lee Gilbert, and Reid & Reid.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">North Carolina Sullivan Acts</span>

In North Carolina, United States, the Sullivan Acts are a set of statutes passed by the North Carolina General Assembly in response to the bankrupting of all sewer and water districts in the City of Asheville and Buncombe County, North Carolina. As provided in the statute, only the City of Asheville, in the provision of water, may not charge a higher rate for consumers outside city limits. Since the enactment of the legislation, several significant changes have come to Asheville: economic prosperity, adoption and termination of a City-County water agreement, and repeated efforts at overturning the legislation. While there are three Acts, the final two are modifications of the water agreement between the City of Asheville and Buncombe County.

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Pack Memorial Library</span>

Pack Memorial Library is a public library located in downtown Asheville, North Carolina. It is the main branch of the Buncombe County Public Library System.

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Bibliography