Tochitsukasa Tetsuo

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Tochitsukasa Tetsuo
栃司 哲史
Personal information
BornTetsuo Goto
(1958-04-25) 25 April 1958 (age 64)
Nagoya, Japan
Height1.80 m (5 ft 11 in)
Weight157 kg (346 lb)
Career
Stable Kasugano
Record465–448–27
DebutMarch, 1981
Highest rankSekiwake (January, 1988)
RetiredMay, 1992
Elder name Irumagawa
Championships 2 (Jūryō)
Special Prizes Fighting Spirit (1)
Technique (1)
Gold Stars 3
Takanosato
Chiyonofuji
Hokutoumi
* Up to date as of Mar 2010.

Tochitsukasa Tetsuo (born 25 April 1958 as Tetsuo Goto) is a former sumo wrestler from Nakagawa, Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. His highest rank was sekiwake . After his retirement from sumo in 1992 he became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association and established Irumagawa stable in 1993, which he ran until 2023.

Contents

Career

A former amateur champion at Nihon University, he turned professional at the age of 23, joining Kasugano stable in March 1981. He reached the top makuuchi division in September 1983, and in 1984 he earned his first special prize for Fighting Spirit, and defeated Takanosato in his first ever bout against a yokozuna to earn his first of his three kinboshi . He spent most of 1985 in the second jūryō division, but in 1986 made the san'yaku ranks at komusubi . In November 1987 he scored 10–5 from the maegashira 6 ranking, defeating two ōzeki and winning the Technique Prize. This earned him promotion to his highest rank of sekiwake for the following tournament in January 1988. However, by the end of the year he was in jūryō again due to injury problems. He won the jūryō yūshō on two occasions in 1989 and won promotion back to the top division. After missing the September 1990 tournament he fell to jūryō again and made only one more appearance in makuuchi before retiring in May 1992 at the age of 34.

Retirement from sumo

He became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association under the name Irumagawa Oyakata, and established Irumagawa stable in 1993. His wrestlers Yotsukasa and Otsukasa both reached the top division in 1999, and they were followed by Masatsukasa in 2008 and Sagatsukasa in 2010. He is due to reach the retirement age for elders of 65 in April 2023, and in preparation for this he handed over control of his stable to former komusubi Kakizoe in February 2023, with the stable henceforth being known as Ikazuchi stable. [1]

Fighting style

A powerful and versatile wrestler, [2] Tochitsukasa preferred tsuki/oshi or pushing and thrusting techniques rather than fighting on the mawashi. His favourite kimarite were oshi-dashi (push out) and tsuki otoshi (thrust over). However he also regularly won by yori-kiri (force out), [3] and was also capable of pulling off throws, both overarm (uwatenage) and underarm (shitatenage). [2]

Trivia

He had a crowd-pleasing quirk of always staying in a squat position for much longer than normal and rocking back and forth before returning to his corner during the shikiri, or warm-up phase of a match. [4]

Career record

Tochitsukasa Tetsuo [5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1981x Makushita tsukedashi #60
61
 
EastMakushita#30
52
 
EastMakushita#17
43
 
WestMakushita#13
52
 
EastMakushita#4
43
 
1982EastJūryō#13
78
 
WestMakushita#1
34
 
WestMakushita#5
52
 
EastMakushita#1
34
 
EastMakushita#7
43
 
EastMakushita#5
52
 
1983WestJūryō#12
96
 
EastJūryō#9
87
 
EastJūryō#5
96
 
WestJūryō#1
87
 
EastMaegashira#13
78
 
WestJūryō#2
96
 
1984EastMaegashira#14
96
 
WestMaegashira#8
78
 
EastMaegashira#9
105
F
WestMaegashira#1
312
EastMaegashira#13
510
 
EastJūryō#5
87
 
1985WestJūryō#4
87
 
EastJūryō#2
87
 
EastJūryō#1
105
 
WestMaegashira#13
69
 
WestJūryō#3
87
 
EastJūryō#3
105P
 
1986EastJūryō#1
96
 
EastMaegashira#12
96
 
EastMaegashira#5
87
 
WestKomusubi#1
411
 
EastMaegashira#3
78
EastMaegashira#4
87
 
1987 WestKomusubi#1
78
 
EastMaegashira#1
510
 
EastMaegashira#6
78
 
WestMaegashira#6
69
 
WestMaegashira#11
87
 
EastMaegashira#6
105
T
1988 WestSekiwake#1
78
 
WestKomusubi#1
510
 
EastMaegashira#4
510
 
WestMaegashira#8
69
 
WestMaegashira#13
447
 
EastJūryō#5
78
 
1989 WestJūryō#5
114
Champion

 
EastJūryō#1
87
 
EastMaegashira#14
663
 
EastJūryō#2
123
Champion

 
EastMaegashira#13
96
 
WestMaegashira#7
87
 
1990 EastMaegashira#2
411
EastMaegashira#10
78
 
WestMaegashira#11
87
 
EastMaegashira#8
96
 
WestMaegashira#2
Sat out due to injury
0015
EastJūryō#1
78
 
1991 EastJūryō#3
87
 
WestJūryō#1
96
 
EastJūryō#1
69
 
EastJūryō#5
96
 
EastJūryō#1
105
 
EastMaegashira#11
213
 
1992 WestJūryō#6
87
 
WestJūryō#4
510
 
EastJūryō#9
Retired
49
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi; P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: Makuuchi Jūryō Makushita Sandanme Jonidan Jonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks:  Yokozuna Ōzeki Sekiwake Komusubi Maegashira

See also

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References

  1. "Former Kakizoe inherits Irumagawa stable, name changes to Ikazuchi stable, revived for the first time in 62 years, Irumagawa retires in April". Nikkan Sports (in Japanese). 26 January 2023. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  2. 1 2 Patmore, Angela (1990). The Giants of Sumo. MacDonald/Queen Anne Press. p. 130. ISBN   0-356-18120-0.
  3. "Tochitsukasa bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 26 March 2010.
  4. Benjamin, David (1992). The Joy of Sumo. Tuttle. p. 111. ISBN   0-8048-1679-4.
  5. "Tochitsukasa Tetsuo Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 16 August 2012.