Todd Farm (North Smithfield, Rhode Island)

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Todd Farm
Todd Farm House in North Smithfield Rhode Island RI.jpg
Location North Smithfield, Rhode Island
Area15 acres (6.1 ha)
Built1740
NRHP reference No. 83000004 [1]
Added to NRHPFebruary 10, 1983

The Todd Farm (also known as the Smith-Andrews-Taft-Todd Farm) is an historic farm at 670 Farnum Pike (Greenville Road) in North Smithfield, Rhode Island, US. The farm includes a house dating to 1740, as well as a collection of outbuildings dating to the early 20th century. The main block of the house is a 2 12-story wood-frame structure, five bays wide, with a gable roof and a large central chimney. The main block has been added to numerous times, with full-size additions to both sides as well as a sloping addition to the rear, giving the house a saltbox appearance in the rear and a total width of 11 bays. Behind and beside the house are arrayed a number of small outbuildings, and a barn which has been converted into residential space. The house was probably built by Noah Smith around 1740, around the time he established a sawmill on Cherry Brook, which runs behind the house and is dammed to form Todd Pond. [2]

The farm was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. January 23, 2007.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Todd Farm" (PDF). Rhode Island Preservation. Retrieved 2014-11-13.