Todd Gloria

Last updated

Council Member Todd Gloria speaking to the San Diego Workforce Partnership. Toddgloriasd.jpg
Council Member Todd Gloria speaking to the San Diego Workforce Partnership.

Gloria ran for the District 3 seat on the San Diego City Council vacated by the termed-out Toni Atkins in the 2008 election. He received a plurality of votes in the June 2008 primary, leading to a November run-off election against fellow Democrat Stephen Whitburn, a former journalist, community activist, and ally of then-District 6 Councilmember Donna Frye. [12] [13] Gloria defeated Whitburn with 54.3% of the vote.

In the 2012 election, Gloria ran for re-election unopposed and was re-elected in the June primary. [15] As of his second term, District 3 included the neighborhoods of Balboa Park, Bankers Hill/Park West, Downtown San Diego, Golden Hill, Hillcrest, Little Italy, Mission Hills, Normal Heights, North Park, Old Town, and University Heights. [16]

Tenure

Gloria and San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer at a San Diego Comic-Con event in 2014 Faulconer gloria 0001.jpg
Gloria and San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer at a San Diego Comic-Con event in 2014

Gloria was chair of the city's Budget and Finance Committee from 2011 to 2016. Gloria represented San Diego on the San Diego Metropolitan Transit System Board and SANDAG, where he chaired the transportation committee. [17] As the Council member for District Three, he also took charge in the merger of multiple homelessness organizations in the city of San Diego. By doing so, Gloria aimed to unify San Diego's allocated resources in the fight to end homelessness in the city.In December 2012, at its first meeting after new members took office, Gloria was unanimously elected to serve as Council President, replacing retiring President Tony Young. [18]

On December 10, 2014, the city council voted 4–5 on a motion of whether to reappoint Gloria as council president for the new term, with Sherri Lightner joining the four council Republicans to defeat the measure. The council then voted 7–2 to appoint Lightner as council president, with Gloria and David Alvarez in opposition. [19]

Interim Mayor

Upon the resignation of Mayor Bob Filner on August 30, 2013, [20] Gloria became the interim mayor of San Diego, with limited powers. [21] This made San Diego the second largest city in the United States (after Houston) to have an openly gay mayor at that time. [22] [23] He served until March 3, 2014, when mayor-elect Kevin Faulconer was sworn in. While serving as interim mayor, he remained the City Councilmember for District 3 and retained the title of City Council President; however, City Council President Pro Tem Sherri Lightner carried out the duties of the Council President. [24] Gloria was considered a possible candidate to replace Filner but chose not to run. [25]

As interim mayor, Gloria reversed several of Filner's actions. He ordered city police and zoning code officers to resume enforcement actions against medical marijuana, [26] re-hired lobbying firms in Sacramento and Washington that Filner had fired, [27] and ordered public records be made more quickly and easily available to citizens. [28]

Gloria's administration authored and released a draft of the San Diego Climate Action Plan. [29]

California State Assembly

Gloria at Balboa Park's 100th anniversary, 2015. Cabrillo Bridge Reenactment 150509-M-PG109-006 (cropped).jpg
Gloria at Balboa Park's 100th anniversary, 2015.

On April 7, 2015, Gloria announced that he would run in 2016 for the California State Assembly 78th district seat held by Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins, who was termed out. Gloria was immediately endorsed by Atkins and by Sarah Boot, who had previously announced her own candidacy for Atkins's seat but withdrew upon Gloria's announcement. [30] While running for State Assembly, Gloria promoted the city's climate action plan. [31] On November 8, 2016, Gloria was easily elected over his relatively unknown Republican opponent with the second-highest margin of victory in San Diego County. [32] He was easily re-elected in 2018 with over 70 percent of the vote in both the primary and the general elections.

Shortly after assuming office in 2016, Gloria was chosen by Speaker Anthony Rendon to join Democratic leadership in the Assembly as Assistant Majority Whip. [33] In January 2018, he became Majority Whip. [34]

Mayor of San Diego

Gloria (front left) meets with Vice President Kamala Harris (front right) in 2021 V20211102LJ-0048 (51685244926).jpg
Gloria (front left) meets with Vice President Kamala Harris (front right) in 2021

Campaign

Gloria announced his candidacy for mayor of San Diego in 2020 on January 9, 2019. Gloria's campaign focused on issues such as the housing crisis, affordability, public transportation, and climate change. [35] [36] Gloria was endorsed by several politicians including Governor Gavin Newsom, former Governor Jerry Brown, and San Diego City Attorney Mara Elliott. [37]

On August 20, 2019, Gloria won the San Diego County Democratic Party's endorsement vote, allowing the party to spend money on behalf of his campaign. [38] Gloria received 70% of the votes, exceeding the 60% required to win. Fellow democratic rivals Barbara Bry and Tasha Williamson won 14% and 3% of the votes respectively. [39] [40]

In August 2019, Gloria was accused of collecting funds for his 2020 re-election campaign to the State Assembly before filing his intent to run with the state in violation of state law. [41] [42] Gloria claimed this was a technical oversight and filed the relevant paperwork the next day. [43]

With the Mayor being a "voter-nominated" office in San Diego, Gloria and Bry advanced to the general election as the top two vote getters from the primary. [44] He was then elected mayor in the November 3 election, making him the first Native American and Filipino-American mayor elected in a US city of over a million people and the city's first mayor of color and the city's first openly gay mayor. [45] [46] He was sworn in on December 10, 2020. [47]

Tenure

Infrastructure

To revitalize the infrastructure of the city, Gloria proposed a budget for Fiscal Year 2023 called the “Ready to Rebuild” proposal. At just under $5 billion dollars total, the budget increased the allocation of funds to street maintenance by $27.6 million, parks and recreation services by $4.3 million, and left $55.8 million dollars from the American Rescue Plan Act money given to the city for the next fiscal year. [48] From the budget initiatives, there are several projects underway to repair the infrastructure of the city that are part of the Capital Improvements Program (CIP). CIP functions as the plan to improve the capital and infrastructure of San Diego over several years. [49] These projects have focus areas that provide important services for San Diego residents such as fire stations, libraries, and parks. [50]

Public Safety

In 2021, Gloria came up with a proposal to reform policing and public safety in San Diego. Many of the items were formed as responses to the citizens of San Diego. For one of the items, Gloria promised to adequately fund the Commission on Police Practices (CPP), which is an independent organization in charge of overseeing and investigating incidents involving the San Diego Police. There is also a clause in the proposal calling for San Diego police to refrain from using military grade weapons unless absolutely necessary. [51] However, some parts of this proposal are not in action yet such as the Commission on Police Practices not being active and no known unconscious and implicit bias trainings being implemented for officers. [52]

Homelessness and Housing

Throughout his duration as mayor, Gloria repeatedly called homelessness as one of his top priorities. [53] [54] During Gloria's tenure, San Diego has created hundreds of beds for the homeless, but seen record levels of unsheltered people in its downtown, and record numbers of homeless deaths. [54]

During his campaign, Gloria proposed the use of housing with wrap-around services, making emergency shelters only available for triage, and replacing temporary shelters with permanent housing for those in need. [55]

In 2021, Gloria proposed roughly $10 million dollars in investments aimed towards homelessness and housing in San Diego in his budget for the fiscal year. [56] The budget allocates funds for the creation of a new department called Homelessness Strategies and Solutions. A majority of the proposed investments will go to interim shelter beds. The proposal also invests $1 million into funding for the People Assisting the Homeless Coordinated Street Outreach Program, a program that provides housing and services to homelessness residents. Rapid-rehousing programs in the city will also benefit from the proposals funding of 100 additional households and rental assistance. [56]

In late June 2023, Todd Gloria signed the "Unsafe Camping Ordinance" following its passage by the San Diego City Council by a 5-4 vote. [57] The law prohibits tent encampments in all public spaces in San Diego if shelter beds are available, and imposes a complete ban on encampments in parks, canyons, near schools, near transit stations, and near homeless shelters. [57] Gloria defended the law, saying that "there has to be consequences for illegal behavior in the city. Now we’re saying you cannot occupy public spaces under certain circumstances", and that the city had expanded its shelter programs. [58] He also stated he wanted to avoid the impression "that it’s easy to be homeless here and you can do drugs in my city". [58] However, a spokesperson for the San Diego Housing Commission said that all of the city's shelters get filled by mid-day, and that most people referred to shelters by police and other authorities don't get placed, reporting that less than one-third of people referred to shelters in June 2023 were placed in one. [58] Some of the city's homeless population reported getting displaced by police when no shelters were available, and one police officer opined that they new law didn't help efforts and was "all the same". [58]

Despite those efforts, the San Diego housing situation remains tense in 2023, with nearly 60% of homes in San Diego having a listing price exceeding $1 million. The city's median home price is $910,000, making it the fourth most expensive among the 30 largest cities in the U.S. [59] [60] The average monthly rent in San Diego has risen to $3,175, placing it as the third-highest in the nation, only $7 less than that of San Francisco. [61]

Electoral history

San Diego City Council

Todd Gloria
Todd Gloria 2022.jpg
Gloria in 2022
37th Mayor of San Diego
Assumed office
December 10, 2020
2008 San Diego City Council District 3 election [62]
Primary election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Todd Gloria 9,288 40.64
Democratic Stephen Whitburn 6,543 28.63
Democratic John Hartley4,01817.58
Nonpartisan Paul Broadway1,4286.25
Nonpartisan Robert E. Lee8403.68
Nonpartisan James Hartline7393.23
Total votes22,856 100%
General election
Democratic Todd Gloria 27,922 54.60
Democratic Stephen Whitburn23,19145.40
Total votes51,398 100%
2012 San Diego City Council District 3 election [63]
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Todd Gloria 24,475 100.00
Total votes24,475 100

California State Assembly

2016 California's 78th State Assembly district election
Primary election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Todd Gloria91,60271.8
Republican Kevin D. Melton36,01328.2
Total votes127,615 100.0
General election
Democratic Todd Gloria122,82868.9
Republican Kevin D. Melton55,41431.1
Total votes178,242 100.0
2018 California's 78th State Assembly district election
Primary election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Todd Gloria (incumbent)79,73871.2
Republican Maggie J. Campbell32,25028.8
Total votes111,988 100.0
General election
Democratic Todd Gloria (incumbent)140,59871.1
Republican Maggie J. Campbell57,21728.9
Total votes197,815 100.0
Democratic hold

Mayor of San Diego

2020 San Diego mayoral election [64]
Primary election
PartyCandidateVotes%
Democratic Todd Gloria 147,654 41.5%
Democratic Barbara Bry 81,541 22.9%
Republican Scott Sherman 80,35222.6%
Democratic Tasha Williamson25,6297.2%
Democratic Gita Applebaum Singh12,7163.6%
OtherRich Riel8,0672.3%
Write-In Jarvis Gandy30.0%
Total votes355,994 100%
General election
Democratic Todd Gloria 346,662 55.9%
Democratic Barbara Bry 272,88745.1%
Total votes619,549 100%

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    Political offices
    Preceded by Mayor of San Diego
    Acting

    2013–2014
    Succeeded by
    Preceded by
    Kevin Faulconer
    Mayor of San Diego
    2020–present
    Incumbent