Tomlinson Mansion

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Tomlinson Mansion
Tomlinson Mansion front.jpg
Front of the house
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Location901 W. 3rd St., Williamstown, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°24′3″N81°27′50″W / 39.40083°N 81.46389°W / 39.40083; -81.46389 Coordinates: 39°24′3″N81°27′50″W / 39.40083°N 81.46389°W / 39.40083; -81.46389
Area1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built1839
Built byTomlinson, Joseph III
NRHP reference No. 74002022 [1]
Added to NRHPJuly 24, 1974

Tomlinson Mansion is a historic home located at Williamstown, Wood County, West Virginia. It was built in 1839, and is a two-story, "L"-shaped brick building with a slate-covered gable roof. The front facade features a small, pediment-like roof above the front door that is supported by four rectangular columns. It is the oldest home in Williamstown and its most notable guest was John James Audubon, who stayed at the Tomlinson Mansion while collecting material on the bluebird and other birds native to the area. [2]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. Rodney S, Collins (October 1977). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Tomlinson Mansion" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-09-15.