Trinidad and Tobago women's national football team

Last updated

Trinidad and Tobago
Nickname(s) Women Soca Warriors
Association Trinidad and Tobago Football Association
Confederation CONCACAF (North America, Central America and the Caribbean)
Sub-confederation CFU (Caribbean)
Head coach Anton Corneal (caretaker)
Home stadium Hasely Crawford Stadium
FIFA code TRI
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First colours
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Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 61 Steady2.svg(27 September 2019) [1]
Highest38 (June 2007)
Lowest106 (March 2010)
First international
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 3–1 Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg
(Haiti; 20 April 1991)
Biggest win
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 13–0 Dominica  Flag of Dominica.svg
(Trinidad and Tobago; 5 July 2002)
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg  Trinidad and Tobago 13–0 Grenada  Flag of Grenada.svg
(Trinidad and Tobago; 27 May 2018)
Biggest defeat
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 11–0 Trinidad and Tobago  Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
(Brazil; 20 June 2000)
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances9 (first in 1991)
Best result3rd

The Trinidad & Tobago women's national football team is commonly known in their country as the "Soca Princesses", but they prefer to be called the Women Soca Warriors (a reference to their male counterparts who are known as the Soca Warriors). They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Jamaica and Haiti. Trinidad & Tobago women's national football team is currently coached by Richard Hood, who replaced Randy Waldrum in 2016.

Jamaica women's national football team, nicknamed the "Reggae Girlz", is one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Trinidad and Tobago and Haiti. In 2008, the team was disbanded after it failed to get out of the group stage of Olympic Qualifying, which notably featured the United States and Mexico. The program was restarted in 2014 after a nearly six-year hiatus, finishing second at the 2014 Women's Caribbean Cup after losing 1–0 against Trinidad and Tobago in the final. The team is backed by ambassador Cedella Marley, the daughter of the late Bob Marley; she helps raise awareness for the team, encourages development, and provides for it financially. Jamaica qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, but the team was eliminated after losing all its matches in the group stage.

The Haiti women's national football team participates in several competitions including the CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup. The team also participates in qualification for the FIFA Women's World Cup and Summer Olympics, although they have yet to succeed in qualifying for either tournament. The team is controlled by the Fédération Haïtienne de Football. They are one of the top women's national football teams in the Caribbean region along with Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago. Haiti women's national football team is currently coached by Shek Borkowski who is also the coach of the under 17 and under 20 teams.

Randy Waldrum American soccer player and coach

Randy Jordan Waldrum is a former professional and collegiate soccer head coach, and the appointed head coach of the University of Pittsburgh women's soccer team on December 19, 2017.

Contents

Home ground

The national team plays their home games generally in one of three stadia in the country. Games of significant importance are usually played at the Hasely Crawford Stadium. However, many World Cup qualification matches have been played at the Queen's Park Oval, a multipurpose, but primarily cricket, stadium. Low profile games, such as international friendlies against other islands in the Caribbean, are played at the Marvin Lee Stadium.

Hasely Crawford Stadium football stadium

The Hasely Crawford Stadium, formerly the National Stadium, is located in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. It was inaugurated and formally opened by Prime Minister George Chambers on 12 June 1982. On 30 December 1996, Prime Minister Basdeo Panday officially designated it "The Hasely Crawford Stadium", after the first person from Trinidad and Tobago to win an Olympic gold medal.

Queens Park Oval

The Queen's Park Oval is a sports stadium in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, used mostly for cricket matches. It opened in 1896. Privately owned by the Queen's Park Cricket Club, it is currently the largest capacity cricket ground in the West Indies with seating for about 20,000.

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

World Cup record

World Cup Finals
YearResultGPWD*LGFGAGD
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 1991 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of Sweden.svg 1995 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of the United States.svg 1999 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of the United States.svg 2003 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2007 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of Germany.svg 2011 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 Did Not Qualify-------
Flag of France.svg 2019 Did Not Qualify-------
Total0/8-------
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

U-20 World Cup record

2002 FIFA U-19 Womens World Championship

The 2002 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 17 August to 1 September. It was the first sanctioned youth tournament for women put together by FIFA. The tournament was hosted by Canada. FIFA granted the tournament to Canada in March 2001. Three cities hosted the tournament, Edmonton, Vancouver, and Victoria. Canada's Christine Sinclair won the Golden Ball as the tournament's best player and the Golden Shoe as top-scorer.

The 2004 FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship was held from 10 to 27 November 2004. It was the second edition of the youth tournament for women put together by FIFA, before being renamed FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship for the 2006 edition. The tournament was hosted by Thailand, in two stadiums in Bangkok, one in Chiang Mai and another in Phuket. This was the first FIFA women's tournament held in Southeast Asia.

2006 FIFA U-20 Womens World Championship

The 2006 FIFA U-20 Women's World Championship was held in Russia from 17 August to 3 September 2006. It was the officially recognized world championship for women's under-20 national association football teams. Matches were held in four Moscow stadiums and one in Saint Petersburg.

U-17 World Cup record

2008 FIFA U-17 Womens World Cup

The 2008 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup is the first ever women's football U-17 World Cup in FIFA history. It was held in New Zealand from 28 October to 16 November 2008. It is the officially recognized world championship for women's under-17 national football teams. This was the first women's world youth championship organized by FIFA with the age limit of 17.

2010 FIFA U-17 Womens World Cup

The 2010 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup women's football tournament is the second such tournament, and was held in Trinidad and Tobago from 5 to 25 September 2010. Sixteen teams, comprising representatives from all six confederations, took part in the final competition, in which Trinidad and Tobago had a guaranteed place as the host nation.

2012 FIFA U-17 Womens World Cup

The 2012 FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup was the third edition of the women's football tournament, and was held in Azerbaijan from 22 September to 13 October, following a decision by the Executive Committee on 19 March 2010. Defending champions South Korea failed to qualify for the tournament. France won the title after defeating Korea DPR 1–1.

Olympics

Football at the 2016 Summer Olympics association football played during the 2016 Olympic Summer Games

The association football tournament at the 2016 Summer Olympics was held from 3 to 20 August in Brazil.

Pan American Games

YearResultMatchesWinsDrawsLossesGFGA
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1999 -000000
Flag of the Dominican Republic.svg 2003 -000000
Flag of Brazil.svg 2007 -000000
Flag of Mexico.svg 2011 -000000
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 2015 -000000
Flag of Peru.svg 2019 Qualified
Total5/5000000

CONCACAF Women's Championship & Gold Cup record

They are the only nation to appear in every CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Women's Gold Cup
YearResultMatchesWinsDraws*LossesGFGAGD
Flag of Haiti.svg 1991 Third Place3212824−16
Flag of the United States.svg 1993 Group Stage3003020−20
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1994 Fourth Place4112620−14
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg 1998 Group Stage311156−1
Flag of the United States.svg 2000 Group Stage3012224−22
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Flag of the United States.svg 2002 Group Stage300329−7
Flag of the United States.svg 2006 Quarterfinals100103−3
Flag of Mexico.svg 2010 Group Stage3102440
Flag of the United States.svg 2014 Fourth Place520367−1
Flag of the United States.svg 2018 Group Stage3003114-13
Total9/928741733117−84
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Recent schedule and results

2018

Current squad

For the 2018 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Head coach: Shawn Cooper

No.Pos.PlayerDate of birth (age)CapsGoalsClub
11 GK Kimika Forbes (1990-08-28) 28 August 1990 (age 29) Flag of Colombia.svg Millonarios
201 GK Saundra Baron (1994-07-20) 20 July 1994 (age 25) Flag of Israel.svg Maccabi Kishronot Hadera

22 DF Ayana Russell (1988-03-16) 16 March 1988 (age 31) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg QPCC Football
42 DF Rhea Belgrave (1991-07-19) 19 July 1991 (age 28) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Real Dimension WFC
52 DF Arin King (1991-02-08) 8 February 1991 (age 28)Unattached
72 DF Jonelle Cato (1995-03-14) 14 March 1995 (age 24) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Trincity Nationals
82 DF Patrice Superville (1987-04-08) 8 April 1987 (age 32) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg QPCC Football
92 DF Liana Hinds (1995-02-23) 23 February 1995 (age 24) Flag of Sweden.svg Sundsvalls DFF
132 DF Jenelle Cunningham (1990-04-29) 29 April 1990 (age 29) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Real Dimension WFC
162 DF Cecily Stoute (1999-10-26) 26 October 1999 (age 19) Flag of the United States.svg Georgia Lady Bulldogs
172 DF Lauryn Hutchinson (1991-06-12) 12 June 1991 (age 28)Unattached

113 MF Janine François (1989-01-01) 1 January 1989 (age 30) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Real Dimension WFC
123 MF Kayla Taylor (1994-10-29) 29 October 1994 (age 24) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Petrotrin
143 MF Karyn Forbes (1991-08-27) 27 August 1991 (age 28) Flag of Iceland.svg Fjarðab/Höttur/Leiknir
153 MF Shenelle Henry (1990-04-04) 4 April 1990 (age 29)Unattached
183 MF Naomie Guerra (1996-06-01) 1 June 1996 (age 23) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg St. Augustine FC

34 FW Mariah Shade (1991-12-09) 9 December 1991 (age 27) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Petrotrin
64 FW Natasha St. Louis (1991-11-01) 1 November 1991 (age 27) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg St. Ann's Rangers
104 FW Tasha St. Louis (1985-12-20) 20 December 1985 (age 33) Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Real Dimension WFC
194 FW Kennya Cordner (1988-11-11) 11 November 1988 (age 30) Flag of Norway.svg IL Sandviken

Staff

as of 11 July 2016 [2]

Head coach
Team chef
Assistant coach
Manager
Technical director

See also

Trinidad and Tobago women's national under-17 football team represents Trinidad and Tobago in international youth football competitions.

Trinidad and Tobago national football team national association football team

The Trinidad and Tobago national football team, nicknamed the Soca Warriors, represents the twin-island Republic of Trinidad and Tobago in international football. It is controlled by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association and competes in both CONCACAF and the Caribbean Football Union, its sub-continental confederation. The team is ranked 93rd in the world according to the FIFA Rankings, and 89 in the World Football Elo Ratings. They reached the first round of the 2006 World Cup and held the record of being the smallest nation to ever qualify for a World Cup, until the 2018 World Cup, when Iceland broke the (population) record.

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References

  1. "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 27 September 2019.