USS Hummer (AMS-20)

Last updated
USS Harkness (AMCU 12).jpg
A YMS-1-class minesweeper
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Ordered: as USS YMS-372
Laid down: 11 December 1942
Launched: 23 December 1943
Commissioned: 28 March 1944
Decommissioned: 23 June 1946
In service: 3 November 1950
Out of service: 13 November 1953
Stricken: 12 February 1959
Fate: transferred to Japan, 29 January 1959
History
Naval Ensign of Japan.svgJapan
Name: JDS Moroshima (MSC-663)
Acquired: 29 January 1959
General characteristics
Displacement: 215 tons
Length: 136 ft (41 m)
Beam: 24 ft 6 in (7.47 m)
Draught: 10 ft (3.0 m)
Speed: 13 knots
Complement: 50
Armament: one 3 in (76 mm) gun mount

USS Hummer (AMS-20/YMS-372) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to prevent ships from passing.

Contents

History

Hummer (YMS-372) was launched as YMS-372, 23 December 1943 by Weaver Shipyards, Orange, Texas; and commissioned 28 March 1944. She was named Hummer and reclassified AMS-20 on 17 February 1947.

After shakedown and operational training in early 1945, Hummer departed the United States to sweep mines and to patrol between Okinawa and Japan from 29 June to 31 July.

With the cessation of hostilities, the ship swept mines on the coasts of Japan and Korea until 21 February 1946 when she departed for the Western Seaboard of the United States.

Hummer decommissioned 23 June and joined the Pacific Reserve Fleet. She recommissioned 3 November 1950 to help support the United Nations commitment to containing aggression in Korea. Her training and readiness activities centered on the U.S. West Coast between San Diego, California, and San Francisco, California, until 13 November 1953 when she again decommissioned at Long Beach, California. Reclassified MSC(O)-20, 7 February 1955, the ship was transferred to the Japanese Maritime Self Defense Force 29 January 1959, serving as Moroshima.

Military awards and honors

Hummer received three battle stars for her service World War II.

Related Research Articles

USS <i>Hornbill</i> (AMS-19)

USS Hornbill was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. After World War II, she continued to be in use until the mid-1950s.

USS <i>Lapwing</i> (AMS-48)

USS Lapwing was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was named after the lapwing.

USS <i>Turkey</i> (AMS-56)

USS Turkey (AMS-56/YMS-444) was a YMS-135 subclass of YMS-1-class minesweepers built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Lark</i> (AMS-23)

USS Lark was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Seagull</i> (AMS-55)

USS Seagull was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Merganser</i> (AMS-26)

USS Merganser (AMS-26/AMCU-47/MHC-47) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Grouse</i> (AMS-15)

USS Grouse (AMS-15/YMS-321) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Condor</i> (AMS-5)

USS Condor was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was the second U.S. Navy ship named for the condor.

USS <i>Waxbill</i> (MHC-50)

USS Waxbill (MHC-50/AMCU-50/AMS-39/YMS-479/PCS-1456) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-446 subclass acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines placed in the water to prevent ships from passing.

USS Linnet (AMS-24/YMS-395) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Kite</i> (AMS-22)

USS Kite was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II.

USS <i>Mockingbird</i> (AMS-27)

USS Mockingbird (AMS-27/YMS-419) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was the second U.S. Navy ship to be named Mockingbird.

USS <i>Nightingale</i> (AMS-50)

USS Nightingale was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removing mines from minefields laid in the water to prevent ships from passing.

USS <i>Reedbird</i> (AMS-51) U.S. Navy minesweeper

USS Reedbird (AMS-51/YMS-291) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass acquired by the U.S. Navy for the dangerous task of removal of mines that had been placed in coastal waters to prevent ships from passing.

USS <i>Brambling</i> (AMS-42)

USS Brambling (AMS-42/YMS-109) was a YMS-1-class auxiliary motor minesweeper acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines from water that had been placed there to prevent ships from passing.

USS <i>Ostrich</i> (AMS-29)

USS Ostrich was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was the third U.S. Navy ship to be named for the ostrich.

USS <i>Siskin</i> (AMS-58)

USS Siskin (AMS-58/YMS-425) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. She is the only U.S. Navy ship to be named for the siskin.

USS <i>Harkness</i> (AMCU-12)

USS Harkness (AMCU-12/YMS-242) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to prevent ships from passing.

USS <i>Rhea</i> (AMS-52)

USS Rhea (AMS-52/YMS-299) was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-135 subclass acquired by the U.S. Navy for the task of removing mines that had been placed in the water to prevent ships from passing.

USS <i>Swallow</i> (AMS-36)

USS Swallow was a YMS-1-class minesweeper of the YMS-446 subclass built for the United States Navy during World War II. She was originally laid down as PCS-1416, and, when renamed later in her career, became the third U.S. Navy ship named for the swallow.

References