United Nations Security Council Resolution 1166

Last updated

UN Security Council
Resolution 1166
Flag of ICTY.jpg
Flag of the ICTY
Date13 May 1998
Meeting no.3,878
CodeS/RES/1166 (Document)
SubjectThe International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY)
Voting summary
  • 15 voted for
  • None voted against
  • None abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 1166, adopted unanimously on 13 May 1998, after recalling Resolution 827 (1993), the council established a third trial chamber at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). [1]

Contents

The Security Council was convinced that the prosecution of those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law in the former Yugoslavia would contribute to the maintenance of peace in the region. It also recognised the need to increase the number of trial judges and chambers at the ICTY in order to try the large number of people awaiting trial. [ citation needed ]

Acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the council established a third trial chamber at the ICTY and decided that three additional judges would be elected as soon as possible to serve in the new chamber. [2] A list of nominations of between six and nine judges would be established. Finally, the Secretary-General Kofi Annan was requested to make arrangements to enhance the effective functioning of the ICTY.

See also

Related Research Articles

International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia UN ad hoc court

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was a body of the United Nations established to prosecute serious crimes committed during the Yugoslav Wars, and to try their perpetrators. The tribunal was an ad hoc court located in The Hague, Netherlands.

Bosnian genocide Murder of Bosniaks and Bosnian Croats during the Bosnian War

The Bosnian genocide refers to either the Srebrenica massacre or the wider crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing throughout areas controlled by the Army of Republika Srpska (VRS) during the Bosnian War of 1992–1995. The events in Srebrenica in 1995 included the killing of more than 8,000 Bosniak men and boys, as well as the mass expulsion of another 25,000–30,000 Bosniak civilians by VRS units under the command of General Ratko Mladić.

Gabrielle Anne Kirk McDonald is an American lawyer and jurist who, until her retirement in October 2013, served as an American arbitrator on the Iran–United States Claims Tribunal seated in The Hague.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 827

United Nations Security Council resolution 827, adopted unanimously on 25 May 1993, after reaffirming Resolution 713 (1991) and all subsequent resolutions on the topic of the former Yugoslavia, approved report S/25704 of Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, with the Statute of the International Tribunal as an annex, establishing the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

United Nations Security Council Resolution 955

United Nations Security Council resolution 955, adopted on 8 November 1994, after recalling all resolutions on Rwanda, the Council noted that serious violations of international humanitarian law had taken place in the country and, acting under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, established the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1047

United Nations Security Council resolution 1047, adopted unanimously on 29 February 1996, after recalling resolutions 808 (1993), 827 (1993), 936 (1994) and 955 (1994), the Council appointed Louise Arbour as Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1126

United Nations Security Council resolution 1126, adopted unanimously on 27 August 1997, after receiving a letter from the Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the Council endorsed his recommendation that judges Karibi-Whyte, Odio Benito and Jan, once they were replaced, finish the Čelebići case that they began before they ended their term of office. It also noted the intention of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia to finish the case by November 1998.

United Nations Security Council resolution 1165, adopted unanimously on 30 April 1998, after recalling Resolution 955 (1994), the council established a third trial chamber at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1191

United Nations Security Council resolution 1191, adopted unanimously on 27 August 1998, after recalling resolutions 808 (1993), 827 (1993) and 1166 (1998), the Council forwarded a list of nine nominations for judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to the General Assembly for consideration.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1329

United Nations Security Council resolution 1329, adopted unanimously on 30 November 2000, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993) and 955 (1994), the Council enlarged the appeals chambers at both the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), proposed the election of two additional judges at the ICTR and established a pool of ad litem judges at the ICTY.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1931

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1931, adopted unanimously on June 29, 2010, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 1581 (2005), 1597 (2005), 1613 (2005), 1629 (2005), 1660 (2006), 1668 (2006), 1800 (2008), 1837 (2008), 1849 (2008), 1877 (2009), 1900 (2009) and 1915 (2010), the Council noted that the 2010 target for the completion of trials at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) could not be met, and therefore extended the terms of 23 judges at the ICTY.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1411

United Nations Security Council resolution 1411, adopted unanimously on 17 May 2002, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 955 (1994), 1165 (1998), 1166 (1998) and 1329 (2000), the Council amended the statutes of the International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda (ICTR) and the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to address the issue of judges holding dual nationalities.

United Nations Security Council resolution 1431, adopted unanimously on 14 August 2002, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 955 (1994), 1165 (1998), 1166 (1998), 1329 (2000) and 1411 (2002), the Council established a pool of temporary judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) in order for it to complete its work as soon as possible.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1481

United Nations Security Council resolution 1481, adopted unanimously on 19 May 2003, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 1166 (1998), 1329 (2000), 1411 (2002) and 1431 (2002), the Council amended the statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to allow temporary judges to adjudicate in pre-trial proceedings in other cases before their appointment to a trial.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1503

United Nations Security Council resolution 1503, adopted unanimously on 28 August 2003, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 955 (1994), 978 (1995), 1165 (1998), 1166 (1998), 1329 (2000), 1411 (2002), 1431 (2002) and 1481 (2003), the Council decided to split the prosecutorial duties of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) which had previously been under the responsibility of one official, Carla Del Ponte, since 1999.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1534

United Nations Security Council resolution 1534, adopted unanimously on 26 March 2004, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 955 (1994), 978 (1995), 1165 (1998), 1166 (1998), 1329 (2000), 1411 (2002), 1431 (2002) and 1481 (2003), the Council called on the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) to complete all trial activities by the end of 2008.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1597

United Nations Security Council resolution 1597, adopted unanimously on 20 April 2005, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 1166 (1998), 1329 (2003), 1411 (2002), 1431 (2002), 1481 (2003), 1503 (2003) and 1534 (2004), the Council amended the statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in order to allow temporary judges to be re-elected.

International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals

The International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals, also referred to as the IRMCT or the Mechanism, is an international court established by the United Nations Security Council in 2010 to perform the remaining functions of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) following the completion of those tribunals' respective mandates.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1660

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1660, adopted unanimously on February 28, 2006, after recalling resolutions 827 (1993), 1166 (1996), 1329 (2000), 1411 (2002), 1431 (2002), 1481 (2003), 1503 (2003), 1534 (2004) and 1597 (2005), the Council amended the statute of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) concerning the appointment of reserve judges.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1877 was unanimously adopted on 7 July 2009.

References

  1. "Council decides to establish third trial chamber of International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia". United Nations. 13 May 1998.
  2. Keesing's Record of World Events (1998). May 1998 – Bosnia & Herzegovina. 44. Keesing's Worldwide. p. 42,302.