United Nations Security Council Resolution 1189

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UN Security Council
Resolution 1189
Kenya bombing 1.jpg
Aftermath of bombing in Kenya
Date13 August 1998
Meeting no.3,915
CodeS/RES/1189 (Document)
SubjectActs of international terrorism
Voting summary
15 voted for
None voted against
None abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 1189, adopted unanimously on 13 August 1998, after expressing its deep disturbance at the bombings in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on 7 August 1998, the Council strongly condemned the terrorist attacks and called on countries to adopt measures to prevent further incidents. [1]

Contents

Background

On 7 August 1998, hundreds of people were killed in simultaneous truck bomb explosions at the United States embassies in the major East African cities of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya. The attacks, linked to local members of the Egyptian Islamic Jihad, brought Osama bin Laden and Ayman al-Zawahiri to American attention for the first time, and resulted in the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation placing bin Laden on its Ten Most Wanted list.

Resolution

The Security Council was shocked at the attacks which had a damaging effect on international relations and was convinced that the suppression of acts of terrorism was essential for international peace and security. [2] It stressed that every Member State should refrain from organising, encouraging or participating in terrorist acts in other countries. Furthermore, there was a need to strengthen international co-operation between states to take measures to prevent and combat terrorism. [3]

The bombings in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam were strongly condemned, and condolences were expressed to the families of the victims. All countries and international institutions were urged to provide assistance to the investigations in Kenya, Tanzania and the United States to apprehend those responsible and to facilitate reconstruction of infrastructure in both countries. [4] Finally, all countries were urged to adopt, in accordance with international law, measures for security and co-operation to prevent further acts and for the prosecution and punishment of the perpetrators of terrorism.

See also

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References

  1. "Security Council strongly condemns terrorist bomb attacks in Nairobi and Dar es Salaam on 7 August". United Nations. 13 August 1998.
  2. Schweigman, David (2001). The authority of the Security Council under Chapter VII of the UN Charter: legal limits and the role of the International Court of Justice. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. p. 147. ISBN   978-90-411-1641-3.
  3. van den Wyngaert, Christine; Stessens, Guy; Janssens, Liesbeth (2005). International criminal law: a collection of international and European instruments (3rd ed.). Martinus Nijhoff Publishers. p. 657. ISBN   978-90-04-14232-9.
  4. Flynn, E. J. (2007). "The Security Council's Counter-Terrorism Committee and Human Rights". Human Rights Law Review. 7 (2): 371–384. doi:10.1093/hrlr/ngm009.