United Nations Security Council Resolution 970

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UN Security Council
Resolution 970
Serbia Map.png
Serbia and Montenegro
Date12 January 1995
Meeting no.3,487
CodeS/RES/970 (Document)
SubjectFormer Yugoslavia
Voting summary
  • 14 voted for
  • None voted against
  • 1 abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 970, adopted on 12 January 1995, after reaffirming all resolutions on the situation in Bosnia and Herzegovina in particular Resolution 943 (1994) concerning the border closure between the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro) and Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Council decided that measures in that resolution would be suspended for a further period of 100 days. [1]

Contents

The Security Council welcomed the steps that Serbia and Montenegro took in maintaining the closure of its border with Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was important that the border remained closed, and that any violations of the closure were punished, noting that parts of Resolution 757 (1992) remained in force.

Requirements in Resolution 820 (1993) stating that import to, export from and transshipment through the United Nations Protected Areas in Croatia and areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina under the control of Bosnian Serb forces would have to be approved by the governments of both countries, except for humanitarian aid, were reaffirmed. The Committee of the Security Council established in Resolution 757 (1992) concerning requests for humanitarian assistance including from the International Committee of the Red Cross and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and other organisations was urged to adopt streamlined procedures.

The Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali was requested to report to the council every 30 days as to whether Serbia and Montenegro was effectively implementing the border closure, and that if not, the suspension of restrictions and other measures would be terminated within 5 working days. [2] The Council concluded by stating it would keep the situation under review.

Russia abstained from the vote on Resolution 970, which was approved by the other 14 members of the council. [3]

See also

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References

  1. Woodward, Susan L. (1995). Balkan tragedy: chaos and dissolution after the Cold War . Brookings Institution Press. p.  423. ISBN   978-0-8157-9513-1.
  2. Ramcharan, B. G. (1997). The International Conference on the Former Yugoslavia: official papers, Volume 1. BRILL. p. 1051. ISBN   978-90-411-0429-8.
  3. Coicaud, Jean-Marc (2007). Beyond the national interest: the future of UN peacekeeping and multilateralism in an era of U.S. primacy . US Institute of Peace Press. p.  229. ISBN   978-1-60127-007-8.