Watkins Ferry Toll House

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Watkins Ferry Toll House
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Location Rt. 11, Martinsburg, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°35′50″N77°50′23″W / 39.59722°N 77.83972°W / 39.59722; -77.83972 Coordinates: 39°35′50″N77°50′23″W / 39.59722°N 77.83972°W / 39.59722; -77.83972
Area 1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built 1837
Architectural style Greek Revival
MPS Berkeley County MRA
NRHP reference #

80004427

[1]
Added to NRHP December 10, 1980

Watkins Ferry Toll House was an historic toll house located at Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia. It was built in 1837, and was a small rectangular stone building, measuring approximately 17 feet wide by 23 feet deep. It had a gable roof and featured Greek Revival-style architectural details. [2] While being used as a private dwelling, it burned on February 8, 1985. The remains of the foundation were finally removed in early 2004 to make room for a housing development. [3]

Martinsburg, West Virginia City in West Virginia, United States

Martinsburg is a city in and the county seat of Berkeley County, West Virginia, United States, in the tip of the state's Eastern Panhandle region in the lower Shenandoah Valley. Its population was 17,687 in the 2016 census estimate, making it the largest city in the Eastern Panhandle and the ninth-largest municipality in the state. Martinsburg is part of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Berkeley County, West Virginia County in the United States

Berkeley County is located in the Shenandoah Valley in the Eastern Panhandle region of West Virginia in the United States. The county is part of the Hagerstown-Martinsburg, MD-WV Metropolitan Statistical Area.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Don C. Wood (n.d.). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Watkins Ferry Toll House" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-06-02.
  3. unknown (October 20, 2007). "Battle of Falling Waters, July 2, 1861: "Escape of Rebel Picket"". Falling Waters Battlefield Association. Retrieved 2011-06-02.