Yale University Press

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Yale University Press
Yale press logo.png
Parent company Yale University
Founded1908
FounderGeorge Parmly Day
Country of originUSA
Headquarters location New Haven, Connecticut
Distribution TriLiteral (United States)
John Wiley & Sons (international) [1] [2]
Nonfiction topicsVarious
Fiction genres Poetry, Literature in translation
Official website yalebooks.yale.edu
George Parmly Day, founder of the Yale University Press Portrait of George Parmly Day.jpg
George Parmly Day, founder of the Yale University Press

Yale University Press is a university press associated with Yale University. It was founded in 1908 by George Parmly Day, [3] and became an official department of Yale University in 1961, but it remains financially and operationally autonomous.

University press publisher associated with a university

A university press is an academic publishing house specializing in academic monographs and scholarly journals. Most are nonprofit and an integral component of a large research university. They publish work that has been reviewed by scholars in the field. They produce mainly scholarly works, but also often have "popular" titles, such as books on religion or on regional topics. Because scholarly books are mostly unprofitable, university presses may also publish textbooks and reference works, which tend to have larger audiences and sell more copies. Most university presses operate at a loss and are subsidized by their owners; others are required to break even. Demand has fallen as library budgets are cut and the online sales of used books undercut the new book market. Many presses are experimenting with electronic publishing.

Yale University private research university in New Haven, Connecticut, United States

Yale University is a private Ivy League research university in New Haven, Connecticut. Founded in 1701, it is the third-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine Colonial Colleges chartered before the American Revolution.

An academic department is a division of a university or school faculty devoted to a particular academic discipline. This article covers United States usage at the university level. In the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth countries, universities tend to use the term faculty; faculties are typically further divided into schools or departments.

Contents

As of 2009, Yale University Press published approximately 300 new hardcover and 150 new paperback books annually and has more than 6,000 books in print. Its books have won five National Book Awards, two National Book Critics Circle Awards and eight Pulitzer Prizes. [4]

Hardcover book bound with a rigid protective cover

A hardcover or hardback book is one bound with rigid protective covers. It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.

Paperback book with a paper or paperboard cover, for trade paperback see Q990683

A paperback, also known as a softcover or softback, is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper.

The National Book Awards are a set of annual U.S. literary awards. At the final National Book Awards Ceremony every November, the National Book Foundation presents the National Book Awards and two lifetime achievement awards to authors.

The press maintains offices in New Haven, Connecticut and London, England. It was a co-founder of the distributor TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press and Harvard University Press. [5] TriLiteral was sold to LSC Communications in 2018. [6]

New Haven, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

New Haven is a coastal city in the U.S. state of Connecticut. It is located on New Haven Harbor on the northern shore of Long Island Sound in New Haven County, Connecticut, and is part of the New York metropolitan area. With a population of 129,779 as determined by the 2010 United States Census, it is the second-largest city in Connecticut after Bridgeport. New Haven is the principal municipality of Greater New Haven, which had a total population of 862,477 in 2010.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom, as well as the largest city within the European Union. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

MIT Press American university press

The MIT Press is a university press affiliated with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Series and publishing programs

The Yale University Press' original logo, designed by Paul Rand. Yale University Press (logo).png
The Yale University Press' original logo, designed by Paul Rand.

Yale Series of Younger Poets

Since its inception in 1919, the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition has published the first collection of poetry by new poets. The first winner was Howard Buck; the 2011 winner was Katherine Larson.

Howard Swazey Buck was an American poet and critic.

Katherine Larson is an American poet, molecular biologist and field ecologist. She is the 2010 winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets Competition and her first collection of poetry, Radial Symmetry, was published by Yale University Press in 2011.

Yale Drama Series

Yale University Press and Yale Repertory Theatre jointly sponsor the Yale Drama Series, a playwriting competition. The winner of the annual competition is awarded the David C. Horn Prize of $10,000, publication of his/her manuscript by Yale University Press, and a staged reading at Yale Rep. The Yale Drama Series and David C. Horn Prize are funded by the David Charles Horn Foundation. [7]

Yale Repertory Theatre

Yale Repertory Theatre at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut was founded by Robert Brustein, dean of Yale School of Drama, in 1966, with the goal of facilitating a meaningful collaboration between theatre professionals and talented students. In the process it has become one of the first distinguished regional theatres. Located at the edge of Yale's main downtown campus, it occupies the former Calvary Baptist Church.

Anchor Yale Bible Series

In 2007, Yale University Press acquired the Anchor Bible Series, a collection of more than 115 volumes of biblical scholarship, from the Doubleday Publishing Group. [8] New and backlist titles are now published under the Anchor Yale Bible Series name.

Anchor Bible Series

The Anchor Bible project, consisting of a commentary series, Bible dictionary, and reference library, is a scholarly and commercial co-venture begun in 1956, when individual volumes in the commentary series began production. Having initiated a new era of cooperation among scholars in biblical research, over 1,000 scholars—representing Jewish, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Protestant, Muslim, secular, and other traditions—have now contributed to the project. Their works offer discussions that reflect a range of viewpoints across a wide theological spectrum. The Anchor Bible project continues to produce volumes that keep readers current on recent scholarship and are grounded in analysis. The works bring advances in science and technology to bear on biblical materials, making historical and linguistic knowledge related to the interpretation of the biblical record available to experts and students alike. As of 2005, more than 120 volumes had been published, each edited by David Noel Freedman, General Editor and published by Doubleday, Freedman died in 2008. Since then John J. Collins has served as the General Editor. In 2007, Yale University Press purchased the Anchor Bible Series. Yale now publishes backlist titles and new titles as the Anchor Yale Bible Series.

Future of American Democracy Series

Yale University Press is publishing the Future of American Democracy Series, [9] which "aims to examine, sustain, and renew the historic vision of American democracy in a series of books by some of America's foremost thinkers", in partnership with the Future of American Democracy Foundation. [10]

The Lamar Series in Western History

The Lamar Series in Western History (formerly the Yale Western Americana series) [11] was established in 1962 to publish works that enhance the understanding of human affairs in the American West and contribute to a wider understanding of why the West matters in the political, social, and cultural life of America. [12]

Terry Lectures Series

The Dwight H. Terry Lectureship was established in 1905 to encourage the consideration of religion in the context of modern science, psychology, and philosophy. Many of the lectures, which are hosted by Yale University, have been edited into book form by the Yale University Press.

Yale Nota Bene

On September 22, 2000, Yale University Press announced a new Yale Nota Bene imprint that would "feature reprints of best-selling and classic Yale Press titles encompassing works of history, religion, science, current affairs, reference and biography, in addition to fiction, poetry and drama." [13]

Yale Publishing Course

The Yale Publishing Course was founded in 2010 by former Publishing Director of the Yale University Press, Tina C. Weiner. It filled the gap created by the closing of the legendary Stanford Publishing Course. It operates under the aegis of the Office of International Affairs of Yale University.

The Course trains mid to senior-level publishing professionals to tackle the most compelling issues facing the publishing industry and concentrates on building leadership skills. The curriculum focuses on in-depth analyses of global trends, innovative business models, management strategies, and new advances in technology. Its immersive week-long programs, one devoted to book publishing and the other to magazine and digital publishing, combine lectures, discussion groups, and one-on-one counseling sessions. The faculty is made up of leading industry experts and members of the Yale School of Management, the Yale Library, and the Yale University Press.

Participants come from all over the world and represent all areas of publishing within organizations of all sizes and types of publications.

Controversies

Mangling the Typesetting of Mises' "Human Action"

In 1963, the Press published a revised edition of Ludwig von Mises's "Human Action". In the May 5, 1964 issue of National Review , Henry Hazlitt wrote the story "Mangling a Masterpiece", accusing Yale University Press of intentionally typesetting the new edition in an amateurish fashion, due to the Press's differing ideological beliefs. [14] [15]

Muhammad cartoon controversy

In August, 2009, officials at the Press ignited a controversy when they decided to expunge reproductions of the cartoons involved in the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy, along with all other images of Muhammad, from a scholarly book entitled The Cartoons that Shook the World , by professor Jytte Klausen. [16]

Related Research Articles

Book of Joel book of the Bible

The Book of Joel is part of the Hebrew Bible, one of twelve prophetic books known as the Twelve Minor Prophets.

Cartoon Form of two-dimensional illustrated visual art

A cartoon is a type of illustration, possibly animated, typically in a non-realistic or semi-realistic style. The specific meaning has evolved over time, but the modern usage usually refers to either: an image or series of images intended for satire, caricature, or humor; or a motion picture that relies on a sequence of illustrations for its animation. Someone who creates cartoons in the first sense is called a cartoonist, and in the second sense they are usually called an animator.

William Harrison Riker was an American political scientist who applied game theory and mathematics to political science.

English Standard Version translation of the Bible

The English Standard Version (ESV) is an English translation of the Bible published in 2001 by Crossway. It is a revision of the Revised Standard Version that employs an "essentially literal" translation philosophy.

Michael Walzer American philosopher

Michael Laban Walzer is a prominent American political theorist and public intellectual. A professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) in Princeton, New Jersey, he is co-editor of Dissent, an intellectual magazine that he has been affiliated with since his years as an undergraduate at Brandeis University. He has written books and essays on a wide range of topics—many in political ethics—including just and unjust wars, nationalism, ethnicity, Zionism, economic justice, social criticism, radicalism, tolerance, and political obligation. He is also a contributing editor to The New Republic. To date, he has written 27 books and published over 300 articles, essays, and book reviews in Dissent, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Harpers, and many philosophical and political science journals.

Arend d'Angremond Lijphart is a political scientist specializing in comparative politics, elections and voting systems, democratic institutions, and ethnicity and politics. He received his PhD in Political Science at Yale University in 1963, after studying at Principia College from 1955 to 1958. He is currently Research Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. Dutch by birth, he has spent most of his working life in the United States and is an American citizen. He has since regained his Dutch citizenship and is now a dual citizen of both the Netherlands and the United States.

Harvard University Press American university publishing house

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, the university appointed as Director George Andreou.

Burton Jesse Hendrick, born in New Haven, Connecticut, was an American author. While attending Yale University, Hendrick was editor of both The Yale Courant and The Yale Literary Magazine. He received his BA in 1895 and his master's in 1897 from Yale. After completing his degree work, Hendrick became editor of the New Haven Morning News. In 1905, after writing for The New York Evening Post and The New York Sun, Hendrick left newspapers and became a "muckraker" writing for McClure's Magazine. His "The Story of Life-Insurance" exposé appeared in McClure's in 1906. Following his career at McClure's, Hendrick went to work in 1913 at Walter Hines Page's World's Work magazine as an associate editor. In 1919, Hendrick began writing biographies, when he was the ghostwriter of Ambassador Morgenthau's Story for Henry Morgenthau, Sr.

John Adalbert Lukacs was a Hungarian-born American historian who wrote more than thirty books, including Five Days in London, May 1940 and A New Republic. He was a professor of history at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia from 1947 to 1994 and chaired that department from 1947 to 1974. He served as a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, Princeton University, La Salle University, Regent College in British Columbia and the University of Budapest and Hanover College. Lukacs was Roman Catholic. Lukacs described himself as a reactionary.

Northwestern University Press

Northwestern University Press is affiliated with Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. It publishes 70 new titles each year in the areas of continental philosophy, Slavic studies, German studies, literary criticism, world classics, fiction, poetry, plays, theater, critical ethnic studies and Chicago regional studies. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses.

Random House of Canada

Random House of Canada was the Canadian distributor for Random House, Inc. from 1944 until 2013. On July 1, 2013, it amalgamated with Penguin Canada to become Penguin Random House Canada.

Turner Publishing Company

Turner Publishing Company is an American independent book publisher based in Nashville, Tennessee. The company is in the top 101 independent publishing companies in the U.S. as compiled by Bookmarket.com and has been named four times to Publishers Weekly 's Fastest Growing Publishers List.

The Cartoons that Shook the World is a 2009 book by Brandeis University professor Jytte Klausen about the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy. Klausen contends that the controversy was deliberately stoked up by people with vested interests on all sides, and argues against the view that it was based on a cultural misunderstanding about the depiction of Muhammad. The book itself caused controversy before its publication when Yale University Press removed all images from the book, including the controversial cartoons themselves and some other images of Muhammad.

John Donatich is the Director of Yale University Press.

<i>Muhammad: The "Banned" Images</i> book by Gary Hull

Muhammad: The "Banned" Images is a 2009 book published in response to the expunging of all images of Muhammad from The Cartoons that Shook the World, a 2009 book about the Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy by Jytte Klausen published by Yale University Press. In August 2009, John Donatich, director of Yale University Press, announced that it would exclude all images of Muhammad from Klausen's book, citing an anonymous panel of experts who claimed that publication of the illustrations "ran a serious risk of instigating violence."

Candida R. Moss is an English academic who is the Edward Cadbury Professor of Theology in the Department of Theology and Religion at the University of Birmingham. A graduate of Oxford and Yale universities, Moss specialises in the study of the New Testament and martyrdom in early Christianity.

Franklin Edgerton was an American linguistic scholar. He was Salisbury Professor of Sanskrit and Comparative Philology at Yale University (1926) and visiting professor at Benares Hindu University (1953–4). Between 1913 and 1926, he was the Professor of Sanskrit at the University of Pennsylvania. He is well known for his exceptionally literal translation of the Bhagavad Gita which was published as volume 38-39 of the Harvard Oriental Series in 1944. He also edited the parallel edition of four recensions of the Simhāsana Dvātrṃśika, and a reconstruction of the (lost) original Sanskrit text of the Panchatantra.

LSC Communications is an American multinational commercial printing company based in Chicago, IL, United States. The company was established in 2016 as part of a corporate spin-off from RR Donnelley. It owns the publishers Research & Education Association and Dover Publications.

References

  1. Contact Us
  2. "Third Party Distribution | Wiley" . Retrieved 2018-02-08.
  3. Bradley, George (1998). "Introduction". The Yale Younger Poets Anthology. New Haven and London. p. 24.
  4. "Donatich Appointed New Director of Yale University Press". Press release. Yale University. December 11, 2002. Retrieved 2011-01-25.
  5. TriLiteral
  6. "LSC Buys TriLiteral; Turner Purchases Gürze Books". PublishersWeekly.com. Retrieved 2018-07-08.
  7. Yale Drama Series: Prize for Emerging Playwrights from the Yale University Press website
  8. "Yale University Press Acquires Anchor Bible Series from Doubleday". Yale Books Unbound. Yale University Press. 2007-09-25. Retrieved 2017-01-24.
  9. The Future of American Democracy Series from the Yale University Press official website
  10. Official website of the Future of American Democracy Foundation
  11. Basbanes, Nicholas A. A World of Letters: Yale University Press, 1908-2008, New Haven and London, 2008. p. 222, Centennial Highlights
  12. The Lamar Series in Western History from the Yale University Press official website
  13. "Yale Press launches new imprint with 'global bookstore appeal'". Yale Bulletin and Calendar. Yale University Press. 29 (3). September 22, 2000.
  14. ""Mangling a Masterpiece" by Henry Hazlitt, National Review, Tuesday, May 5th, 1964". UNZ.org.
  15. GaryNorth.com (2 May 2013). "Publishing Atrocity: The 1963 Edition of Human Action".
  16. Patricia Cohen (August 13, 2009). "Yale Press Bans Images of Muhammad in New Book". The New York Times.
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