(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone

Last updated
"(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone"
Song by Paul Revere & The Raiders
from the album Midnight Ride
Genre Rock
Songwriter(s) Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
Producer(s) Terry Melcher

"(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone" is a rock song written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. It was first recorded by Paul Revere & the Raiders and appeared on their album Midnight Ride , released in May 1966.

Contents

The song is simple musically, with a repeating verse chord progression of E major, G major, A major, and C major, and a repeating bridge in cut time of E major, G major, A major, and G major.

Monkees version

"(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone"
Single by The Monkees
from the album More of the Monkees
A-side "I'm a Believer"
Released12 November 1966
Recorded26 July 1966
Western Recorders Studio #1
Hollywood, CA
Genre
Length2:23
Label Colgems
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s)
  • Tommy Boyce
  • Bobby Hart
The Monkees singles chronology
"Last Train to Clarksville"
(1966)
"(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone"
(1966)
"A Little Bit Me, a Little Bit You"
(1967)

It is best known as a hit for The Monkees (US #20), released in November 1966, (making it the first Monkees B-side to chart). [2] Musicians featured on the Monkees recording are: Micky Dolenz (lead vocal); Tommy Boyce (backing vocal); Wayne Erwin and Gerry McGee (rhythm guitar); Louis Shelton (lead guitar); Bobby Hart (Vox Continental organ); Larry Taylor (bass); Billy Lewis (drums); and Henry Lewy (percussion).

The various Monkees' versions differ across the single, stereo album, and mono album versions. In the stereo version, the track's title is sung just before the second verse, whereas on the single and mono album versions, this segment is left instrumental. Additionally, the stereo version has an edit in the fade out. The mono album version does not have this edit and therefore has a longer coda. The single also does not have the edit, but it fades the song earlier than the mono album. All Monkees' hits compilations through the mid-1980s used the stereo version, and afterward typically used the single version.

Their cover appeared in the 5th episode, "Fork", of the Netflix miniseries, The Queen's Gambit.

Other versions

The song has been covered by many artists. Among the more notable is Modern Rocketry's version in 1983, which reached number 7 on the U.S. Hot Dance/Disco chart; and PJ & Duncan's version in 1996, which reached number 11 on the UK Singles Chart. Punk bands, The Sex Pistols, State of Alert and Minor Threat also have recorded versions of the song. [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 Kim Cooper; David Smay (May 2001). Bubblegum Music is the Naked Truth: The Dark History of Prepubescent Pop, from the Banana Splits to Britney Spears. Feral House. p. 76. ISBN   9780922915699.
  2. Whitburn, Joel, Top Pop Singles 1955–1996, ©1997 Record Research Inc. ISBN   0-89820-122-5
  3. Warwick, Kutner, & Brown, The Complete Book Of The British Charts: Singles and Albums, Omnibus Press 2004, and Xit 86 (2013). ISBN   1-84449-058-0