1912 New York Highlanders season

Last updated

1912 New York Highlanders
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) William Devery and Frank Farrell
Manager(s) Harry Wolverton
< Previous season       Next season >

The 1912 New York Highlanders season was their tenth in New York and their twelfth overall. It was the final season for the "Highlanders", before evolving exclusively into the "Yankees". It was also their final season playing their home games at Hilltop Park. The team finished with a total of 50 wins and 102 losses, coming in 8th, last place in the American League. The club was managed by Harry Wolverton. The New York franchise would not finish in last place again until the 1966 season. To date, this remains the only 100-loss season in Yankees history.

New York Yankees Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in the Bronx, New York, United States

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles. Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.

Hilltop Park New York City baseball venue

Hilltop Park was the nickname of a baseball park that stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. It was the home of the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball from 1903 to 1912, when they were known as the "Highlanders". It was also the temporary home of the New York Giants during a two-month period in 1911 while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt after a fire.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

Contents

Regular season

Logo and uniforms

For 1912, the curving "NY" migrated from the sleeve to its now-familiar spot on the left breast of the jersey (on some versions of the uniform, though not the one shown here). This was also the year the pin stripes were introduced.[ citation needed ]

Pin stripes recurring pattern of thin, widely-spaced stripes

Pinstripes are a pattern of very thin stripes of any color running in parallel often found in cloth. The pinstriped suit has become associated with conservative business attire, although many designers now produce the fashionable pinstripe patterns for fashion-conscious consumers.

Team nickname

By this season, the alternate nickname "Yankees" was in very common usage by the media. The New York Times for Opening Day 1912 reported that "The Yankees presented a natty appearance in their new uniforms of white with black pin stripes." The pin stripes were a one-year experiment, but they would return for good on the home uniforms in 1915.

Opening Day Day on which professional baseball leagues begin their regular season

Opening Day is the day on which professional baseball leagues begin their regular season. For Major League Baseball and most of the minor leagues, this day typically falls during the first week of April.

The final game of the season, and the final game for the "Highlanders" at the Hilltop, was played on October 5, 1912. The team moved to the Polo Grounds the following year. Hilltop Park was closed after the 1912 season and was demolished in 1914. It is now occupied by the NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

Polo Grounds sports venue in Manhattan to 1963 (or multiple venues), professional ballpark 1880 to 1957, 1962-1963

The Polo Grounds was the name of three stadiums in Upper Manhattan, New York City, used mainly for professional baseball and American football from 1880 through 1963. As the name suggests, the original Polo Grounds, opened in 1876 and demolished in 1889, was built for the sport of polo. Bound on the south and north by 110th and 112th Streets and on the east and west by Fifth and Sixth (Lenox) Avenues, just north of Central Park, it was converted to a baseball stadium when leased by the New York Metropolitans in 1880. The third Polo Grounds, built in 1890 and renovated after a fire in 1911, is the one generally indicated when the Polo Grounds is referenced. It was located in Coogan's Hollow and was noted for its distinctive bathtub shape, very short distances to the left and right field walls, and an unusually deep center field.

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Boston Red Sox 105470.69157–2048–27
Washington Senators 91610.5991445–3246–29
Philadelphia Athletics 90620.5921545–3145–31
Chicago White Sox 78760.5062834–4344–33
Cleveland Naps 75780.49030½41–3534–43
Detroit Tigers 69840.45136½37–3932–45
St. Louis Browns 531010.3445327–5026–51
New York Highlanders 501020.3295531–4419–58

Record vs. opponents

1912 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSCWSCLEDETNYPHISTLWSH
Boston 16–6–111–11–115–619–215–717–512–10
Chicago 6–16–111–1114–8–113–912–1013–9–29–13
Cleveland 11–11–111–1113–913–8–18–1415–74–18
Detroit 6–158–14–19–1316–69–1313–98–14
New York 2–199–138–13–16–165–1713–97–15
Philadelphia 7–1510–1214–813–917–516–613–7–1
St. Louis 5–179–13–27–159–139–136–168–14–1
Washington 10–1213–918–414–815–77–13–114–8–1

Notable transactions

Delmar Harold Paddock was a Major League Baseball third baseman. He played part of the 1912 season in the majors with two different teams, the Chicago White Sox and the New York Highlanders.

Roster

1912 New York Highlanders
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

Outfielders

Other batters

Manager

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
C Ed Sweeney 11035194.268030
1B Hal Chase 131522143.274458

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At Bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting Average; HR = Home Runs; RBI = Runs Batted In

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
Del Paddock 4615645.288114
Bill Stumpf 4212931.240010
Harry Wolverton 345015.30004
Johnny Priest 221.50001
Homer Thompson 100----00

Pitching

Starting pitchers

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Russ Ford 36291.213213.55112
Ray Caldwell 30183.18164.4795
George McConnell 23176.28122.7591
Ray Fisher 1790.1285.8847
Ray Keating 635.2035.8021

Other pitchers

PlayerGIPWLERASO
George Davis 1054146.5022
Tommy Thompson 732.2026.0615
Chet Hoff 515.2016.8914

Relief pitchers

PlayerGWLSVERASO
George Shears 40005.409

Related Research Articles

The New York Highlanders' 1903 season finished with the team in 4th place in the American League with a record of 72–62. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played its home games at Hilltop Park. The season began with the Baltimore Orioles relocating to New York in what would be a first of many seasons in the city. The club was at first officially the "Greater New York" baseball club, in deference to the established New York Giants, which were based in the Polo Grounds. This was the first winning season for the franchise that would be later known as the now-storied New York Yankees.

The 1904 New York Highlanders season, their second in New York and fourth overall, finished with the team in second place in the American League with a record of 92–59. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played home games at Hilltop Park.

The 1905 New York Highlanders season was a season in American baseball. It was the team's third season in New York and fifth overall. The Highlanders finished in sixth place in the American League with a record of 71–78. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played its home games at Hilltop Park.

The 1906 New York Highlanders season, its fourth in New York and sixth overall, finished with the team in 2nd place in the American League with a record of 90–61. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played its home games at Hilltop Park.

The 1907 New York Highlanders season, its fifth in New York and its seventh overall, finished with the team in 5th place in the American League with a record of 70–78. Another notable newcomer was New York's recently acquired left fielder Branch Rickey, who would become well known for integrating Jackie Robinson into the major leagues some four decades later.

The 1908 New York Highlanders season finished with the team in 8th place in the American League with a record of 51–103. Their home games were played at Hilltop Park.

The 1909 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 74 wins and 77 losses, coming in 5th in the American League.

The 1910 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 88 wins and 63 losses, coming in second in the American League.

The 1911 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 76 wins and 76 losses, coming in 6th in the American League.

The 1913 New York Yankees season was the club's eleventh in New York and thirteenth overall. The team finished with a record of 57–94, coming in 7th place in the American League. The team also moved into the Polo Grounds which they would share with the New York Giants until 1923.

The 1922 New York Yankees season was the 20th season for the Yankees in New York and their 22nd overall. The team finished with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses, to win their second pennant in franchise history, by a single game over the St. Louis Browns. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

The 1914 New York Yankees season was the club's twelfth in New York and fourteenth overall. The team finished with a record of 70–84, coming in 7th place in the American League.

The 1918 New York Yankees season was the 17th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 60–63, finishing 13.5 games behind the American League champion Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

The 1919 New York Yankees season was the 17th season for the Yankees in New York and its 19th overall. The team finished with a record of 80–59, 7½ games behind the American League champion Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. Their home games were played at the Polo Grounds.

The 1924 New York Yankees season was the team's 22nd season in New York and its 24th overall. The team finished with a record of 89–63, finishing 2 games behind the Washington Senators. New York was managed by Miller Huggins. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

The 1929 New York Yankees season was the team's 27th season in New York and its 29th overall. The team finished with a record of 88–66, finishing in second place, 18 games behind the Philadelphia Athletics. This ended a streak of three straight World Series appearances for the club. New York was managed by Miller Huggins until his death on September 25. They played at Yankee Stadium.

The 1934 New York Yankees season was the team's 32nd season in New York and its 34th season overall. The team finished with a record of 94–60, finishing 7 games behind the Detroit Tigers. New York was managed by Joe McCarthy. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium. It would also be the final year Babe Ruth would play as a Yankee.

The 1959 New York Yankees season was the 57th season for the team in New York and its 59th overall. The team finished in third place in the American League with a record of 79–75, 15 games behind the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Casey Stengel. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

The 1966 New York Yankees season was the 64th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 70–89, finishing 26.5 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Johnny Keane and Ralph Houk. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. Keane managed his final MLB game in early-May, and died the following January at the age of 55.

1912 Chicago White Sox season

In 1912, the Chicago White Sox debuted one of the most enduring and famous logos in baseball – a large "S" in a Roman-style font, with a small "O" inside the top loop of the "S" and a small "X" inside the bottom loop. This is the logo associated with the 1917 World Series championship team and the 1919 Black Sox. With a couple of brief interruptions, the dark blue logo with the large "S" lasted through 1938. Through the 1940s, the White Sox team colors were primarily navy blue trimmed with red.

References