1911 New York Highlanders season

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1911 New York Highlanders
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) William Devery and Frank Farrell
Manager(s) Hal Chase
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The 1911 New York Highlanders season saw the team finishing with a total of 76 wins and 76 losses, coming in 6th in the American League.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

Contents

New York was managed by Hal Chase. Home games were played at Hilltop Park. The alternate and equally unofficial nickname, "Yankees", was being used more and more frequently by the press.

Hal Chase American baseball player, manager

Harold Homer Chase, nicknamed "Prince Hal", was a first baseman and manager in Major League Baseball, widely viewed as the best fielder at his position. During his career, he played for the New York Highlanders (1905–1913), Chicago White Sox (1913–1914), Buffalo Blues (1914–1915), Cincinnati Reds (1916–1918), and New York Giants (1919).

Hilltop Park New York City baseball venue

Hilltop Park was the nickname of a baseball park that stood in the Washington Heights neighborhood of New York City. It was the home of the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball from 1903 to 1912, when they were known as the "Highlanders". It was also the temporary home of the New York Giants during a two-month period in 1911 while the Polo Grounds was being rebuilt after a fire.

Regular season

Relations between the New York Highlanders and the enemy New York Giants seemed to be at a boiling point until a fateful April day when a fire destroyed the main portion of the grandstand at the Polo Grounds, the Giants' home field just a few blocks away (and downhill) from the Hilltop. The Highlanders invited the Giants to play at Hilltop Park for the remainder of the 1911 season. Although the Giants were able to return to their partially rebuilt home two months later, this good deed would be remembered and returned to the Highlanders two years later.

Polo Grounds sports venue in Manhattan to 1963 (or multiple venues), professional ballpark 1880 to 1957, 1962-1963

The Polo Grounds was the name of three stadiums in Upper Manhattan, New York City, used mainly for professional baseball and American football from 1880 through 1963. As the name suggests, the original Polo Grounds, opened in 1876 and demolished in 1889, was built for the sport of polo. Bound on the south and north by 110th and 112th Streets and on the east and west by Fifth and Sixth (Lenox) Avenues, just north of Central Park, it was converted to a baseball stadium when leased by the New York Metropolitans in 1880. The third Polo Grounds, built in 1890 and renovated after a fire in 1911, is the one generally indicated when the Polo Grounds is referenced. It was located in Coogan's Hollow and was noted for its distinctive bathtub shape, very short distances to the left and right field walls, and an unusually deep center field.

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Athletics 101500.66954–2047–30
Detroit Tigers 89650.57813½51–2538–40
Cleveland Naps 80730.5232246–3034–43
Boston Red Sox 78750.5102439–3739–38
Chicago White Sox 77740.5102440–3737–37
New York Highlanders 76760.50025½36–4040–36
Washington Senators 64900.41638½39–3825–52
St. Louis Browns 451070.29656½25–5320–54

Record vs. opponents

1911 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSCWSCLEDETNYPHISTLWSH
Boston 11–1111–1110–1212–109–1312–913–9
Chicago 11–116–15–28–1413–99–11–117–513–9
Cleveland 11–1115–6–26–1614–8–15–1715–714–8
Detroit 12–1014–816–67–1512–1014–814–8
New York 10–129–138–14–115–76–1516–512–10
Philadelphia 13–911–9–117–510–1215–620–215–7
St. Louis 9–125–177–158–145–162–209–13
Washington 9–139–138–148–1410–127–1513–9

Roster

1911 New York Highlanders
Roster
PitchersCatchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManager

Coaches

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
1B Hal Chase 133527166.315362

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
Johnny Priest 8213.14302
Joe Walsh 492.22200
Bill Bailey 591.11100

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Ray Caldwell 4125514143.35145

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Lew Brockett 1675.1244.6625
Andy Coakley 211.2015.404
Harry Ables 311019.826

Relief pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGWLSVERASO


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