1911 Cleveland Naps season

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1911 Cleveland Naps
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s) Charles Somers
Manager(s) Deacon McGuire, George Stovall
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The 1911 Cleveland Naps season was a season in American major league baseball. It involved the Cleveland Naps attempting to win the American League pennant and finishing in third place (22 games back). They had a record of 80 wins and 73 losses.

Cleveland Indians Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Cleveland, Ohio, United States

The Cleveland Indians are an American professional baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division. Since 1994, they have played at Progressive Field. The team's spring training facility is at Goodyear Ballpark in Goodyear, Arizona. Since their establishment as a major league franchise in 1901, the Indians have won two World Series championships: in 1920 and 1948, along with 10 Central Division titles and six American League pennants. The Indians' current World Series championship drought is the longest active drought.

United States Federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country comprising 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

Contents

The Naps played their home games at League Park II.

League Park stadium

League Park was a baseball park located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. It is situated at the northeast corner of E. 66th Street and Lexington Avenue in the Hough neighborhood. It was built in 1891 as a wood structure and rebuilt using concrete and steel in 1910. The park was home to a number of professional sports teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball. League Park was first home to the Cleveland Spiders of the National League from 1891 to 1899 and of the Cleveland Lake Shores of the Western League, the minor league predecessor to the Indians, in 1900. During 1914-1915, League Park also hosted the Toledo Mud Hens of the minor league American Association, under the name Cleveland Bearcats and then Spiders. In the late 1940s, the park was also the home field of the Cleveland Buckeyes of the Negro American League.

Regular season

Season highlights

In his rookie season, Shoeless Joe Jackson hit .408, which ranked second in the American League. He also finished in the league top 10 in home runs, RBI, runs scored, and stolen bases. Jackson was fourth in the Chalmers MVP Award voting.

Shoeless Joe Jackson American baseball player

Joseph Jefferson Jackson, nicknamed "Shoeless Joe", was an American star outfielder who played Major League Baseball (MLB) in the early 1900s. He is remembered for his performance on the field and for his alleged association with the Black Sox Scandal, in which members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox participated in a conspiracy to fix the World Series. As a result of Jackson's association with the scandal, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Major League Baseball's first commissioner, banned Jackson from playing after the 1920 season despite exceptional play in the 1919 World Series, leading both teams in several statistical categories and setting a World Series record with 12 base hits. Since then, Jackson's guilt has been fiercely debated with new accounts claiming his innocence, urging Major League Baseball to reconsider his banishment. As a result of the scandal, Jackson's career was abruptly halted in his prime, ensuring him a place in baseball lore.

Batting average (baseball)

In baseball, the batting average (BA) is defined by the number of hits divided by at bats. It is usually reported to three decimal places and read without the decimal: A player with a batting average of .300 is "batting three-hundred." If necessary to break ties, batting averages could be taken beyond the .001 measurement. In this context, a .001 is considered a "point," such that a .235 batter is 5 points higher than a .230 batter.

Home run in baseball, a 4-base hit, often by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without 1st touching the ground; inside-the-park home runs—where the batter reaches home safely while the ball is in play—are possible but rare

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to circle the bases and reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles without first touching the ground or running to home plate and scoring a point, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field.

Vean Gregg led the starting pitchers of the team in several categories: he had a total of 23 wins and seven losses; he pitched 244⅔ innings, yet maintained a league-leading 1.80 ERA, while striking out 125 batters.

Vean Gregg American baseball player

Sylveanus Augustus Gregg was born April 13, 1885, in Chehalis, Washington. For three years, the left-hander was one of the most dominant pitchers in the major leagues.

Starting pitcher baseball or softball pitcher who throws the first pitch for their team in a game

In baseball, a starting pitcher or starter is the first pitcher in the game for each team. A pitcher is credited with a game started if they throw the first pitch to the opponent's first batter of a game. A pitcher who enters the game after the first pitch of the game is a relief pitcher. Starting pitchers are expected to pitch for a significant portion of the game, although their ability to do this depends on many factors, including effectiveness, stamina, health, and strategy.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

Pitcher Cy Young, 44 years old at the time, played part of his final season with the 1911 Cleveland Naps team. Nap Lajoie, another Hall of Famer, played on this team as well.

Cy Young American baseball player

Denton True "Cy" Young was an American Major League Baseball pitcher. During his 22-season baseball career (1890–1911), he pitched for five different teams. Young established numerous pitching records, some of which have stood for over a century. Young compiled 511 wins, which is most in Major League history and 94 ahead of Walter Johnson, second on the list. Young was elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1937. One year after Young's death, the Cy Young Award was created to honor each previous season's best pitcher.

Nap Lajoie American baseball player

Napoleon Lajoie, also known as Larry Lajoie and nicknamed "The Frenchman", was an American professional baseball second baseman and player-manager. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, Philadelphia Athletics (twice), and Cleveland Naps between 1896 and 1916. He managed the Naps from 1905 through 1909.

National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Professional sports hall of fame in New York, U.S.

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is an American history museum and hall of fame, located in Cooperstown, New York, and operated by private interests. It serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and honors those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations."

Season standings

American League W L Pct. GB Home Road
Philadelphia Athletics 101500.66954–2047–30
Detroit Tigers 89650.57813½51–2538–40
Cleveland Naps 80730.5232246–3034–43
Boston Red Sox 78750.5102439–3739–38
Chicago White Sox 77740.5102440–3737–37
New York Highlanders 76760.50025½36–4040–36
Washington Senators 64900.41638½39–3825–52
St. Louis Browns 451070.29656½25–5320–54

Record vs. opponents

1911 American League Records

Sources:
TeamBOSCWSCLEDETNYPHISTLWSH
Boston 11–1111–1110–1212–109–1312–913–9
Chicago 11–116–15–28–1413–99–11–117–513–9
Cleveland 11–1115–6–26–1614–8–15–1715–714–8
Detroit 12–1014–816–67–1512–1014–814–8
New York 10–129–138–14–115–76–1516–512–10
Philadelphia 13–911–9–117–510–1215–620–215–7
St. Louis 9–125–177–158–145–162–209–13
Washington 9–139–138–148–1410–127–1513–9

Roster

1911 Cleveland Naps
Roster
Pitchers

James Blaine Baskette was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played for three seasons. He played for the Cleveland Naps.

Fred Blanding American baseball player

Frederick James Blanding, nicknamed "Fritz," was an American baseball player. He played five seasons as a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Naps from 1910 to 1914. He pitched a six-hit shutout against Walter Johnson in his Major League debut in September 1910. His best seasons were 1912 and 1913, during which time he compiled a record of 33-24. His career record with Cleveland was 46-46.

Benyew Harrison Demott was a Major League Baseball pitcher who played for two seasons. He played for the Cleveland Naps from 1910 to 1911.

Catchers

Infielders

OutfieldersManagers

Player stats

Batting

Starters by position

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PosPlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
C Gus Fisher 7020353.261012
1B George Stovall 126458124.271079
2B Neal Ball 116412122.296345
3B Terry Turner 117417105.252028
SS Ivy Olson 140545142.261150
OF Joe Jackson 147571233.408783
OF Jack Graney 146527142.269145
OF Joe Birmingham 125447136.304251

Other batters

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

PlayerGABHAvg.HRRBI
Nap Lajoie 90315115.365260
Ted Easterly 9928793.324137
Syd Smith 5815446.299121
Hank Butcher 3813332.241111
Grover Land 3510715.140010
Art Griggs 276817.25017
Bill Lindsay 196616.24205
Cotton Knaupp 13394.10300
Steve O'Neill 9274.14801
Jack Mills 13175.29401
Dave Callahan 6164.25000
Tim Hendryx 472.28600
Herman Bronkie 261.16700
Bert Adams 251.20000
Ben Demott 240.00000

Pitching

Starting pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned Run Average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
Vean Gregg 34244.22371.80125
Gene Krapp 352221393.41132
Willie Mitchell 30177.17143.7678
Cy Falkenberg 15106.2853.2946
Cy Young 746.1343.8820
Bill James 851.2244.8821
Earl Yingling 422.1104.336
Ben Demott 13.20112.272

Other pitchers

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned Run Average; SO = Strikeouts

PlayerGIPWLERASO
George Kahler 30154.1983.2797
Fred Blanding 291767113.6880
Hi West 1364.2343.7617
Spec Harkness 1253.1224.2225
Jim Baskette 421.1123.388
Josh Swindell 417.1012.086
Pat Paige 216104.506
Bugs Reisigl 213016.236

Awards and honors

League top ten finishers

Vean Gregg

Shoeless Joe Jackson

Gene Krapp

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References