1993 Nigerien presidential election

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1993 Nigerien presidential election
Flag of Niger.svg
  1989 27 February 1993 (first round)
27 March 1993 (second round)
1996  
  Elh. Mahamane Ousmane.png Tandja in Nigeria June 2007.jpg
Nominee Mahamane Ousmane Mamadou Tandja
Party CDS-Rahama MNSD
Popular vote763,476639,418
Percentage54.42%45.58%

President before election

Ali Saibou
MNSD

Elected President

Mahamane Ousmane
CDS-Rahama

Presidential elections were held in Niger on 27 February 1993, with a second round on 27 March after no candidate passed the 50% barrier in the first round. They were the first multi-candidate presidential elections held in the country since independence in 1960, following constitutional changes approved in a referendum the previous year. Although Mamadou Tandja of the ruling National Movement for the Development of Society (which had emerged as the largest party in the parliamentary elections) won the most votes in the first round, he lost in the second round to Mahamane Ousmane of the Democratic and Social Convention party. [1] Voter turnout was only 32.5% in the first round and 35.2% in the second. [2]

Results

CandidatePartyFirst roundSecond round
Votes%Votes%
Mamadou Tandja National Movement for the Development of Society 443,22334.28639,41845.58
Mahamane Ousmane Democratic and Social Convention 343,26126.55763,47654.42
Mahamadou Issoufou Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism 205,70715.91
Moumouni Adamou Djermakoye Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress 196,94915.23
Illa Kané Union of Democratic and Progressive Patriots 32,9512.55
Oumarou Garba Issoufou Nigerien Progressive Party – African Democratic Rally 25,7691.99
Omar Katzelma Taya Party for Socialism and Democracy in Niger 23,5651.82
Djibo Bakary Sawaba 21,6621.68
Total1,293,087100.001,402,894100.00
Valid votes1,293,08797.311,402,89497.87
Invalid/blank votes35,6952.6930,4992.13
Total votes1,328,782100.001,433,393100.00
Registered voters/turnout4,082,07632.554,069,33335.22
Source: Nohlen et al.

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References

  1. Elections in Djibouti African Elections database
  2. Dieter Nohlen, Michael Krennerich & Bernhard Thibaut (1999) Elections in Africa: A data handbook, p690 ISBN   0-19-829645-2