1993 Nigerien parliamentary election

Last updated

Parliamentary elections were held in Niger on 14 February 1993. They were the first multi-party elections in the country since independence in 1960, and followed constitutional changes approved in a referendum the previous year. Although the ruling National Movement for the Development of Society won the most seats (29 of the 83), several opposition parties formed the Alliance of the Forces of Change following the elections, between them controlling 50 seats. [1] Voter turnout was just 32.7%. [2]

Contents

Electoral system

Members of the National Assembly were elected by two methods; 75 were elected from eight multi-member districts based on the seven regions and Niamey using party-list proportional representation, with seats allocated using the Hare quota and largest remainder method. A further eight members representing national minorities were elected in single-member constituencies based on the regions using first-past-the-post voting. [3]

Results

PartyVotes%Seats+/–
National Movement for the Development of Society 383,92130.6529–64
Democratic and Social Convention 341,84927.2922New
Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress 193,96715.4811New
Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism 183,15014.6213New
Sawaba 39,2713.132New
Union of Democratic and Progressive Patriots 36,2032.892New
Nigerien Progressive Party – African Democratic Rally 32,6152.602New
Party for Socialism and Democracy in Niger 18,6611.491New
Party of the Masses for Labour 15,4461.230New
Movement for Democracy and Progress 5,9670.480New
Party for National Unity and Development 1,1530.090New
Union for Democracy and Social Progress 4630.041New
Total1,252,666100.0083–10
Valid votes1,252,66695.76
Invalid/blank votes55,4294.24
Total votes1,308,095100.00
Registered voters/turnout3,996,21332.73
Source: Election Passport

Results by region

Agadez Diffa Dosso Maradi Niamey Tahoua Tillabéri Zinder
National Movement for the Development of Society33232592
Democratic and Social Convention10251319
Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress00411140
Nigeren Party for Democracy and Socialism11120512
Others01130012
Total5510144141615
Source: Election Passport

Aftermath

Following the elections, the Democratic and Social Convention, the Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress, the Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism, the Nigerien Progressive Party – African Democratic Rally, the Party for Socialism and Democracy in Niger and the Union for Democracy and Social Progress all joined the Alliance of the Forces of Change.

Related Research Articles

History of Niger Chronicle of the Nigerian past

This is the history of the Niger. See also the history of Africa and the history of West Africa.

Elections in Niger Political elections for public offices in Niger

Elections in Niger take place within the framework of a semi-presidential system. The President and National Assembly are elected by the public, with elections organised by the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI).

National Movement for the Development of Society Political party in Niger

The National Movement for the Development of Society is a political party in Niger. Founded under the military government of the 1974–1990 period, it was the ruling party of Niger from 1989 to 1993 and again from 1999 until a coup on February 18, 2010, by a military junta called the Supreme Council for the Restoration of Democracy (CSRD) ousted the president, Mamadou Tandja.

Nigerien Progressive Party – African Democratic Rally Political party in Niger

The Nigerien Progressive Party – African Democratic Rally is a political party in Niger. It was the leading political party of the pre-independence era, becoming the sole legal party of the First Republic (1960–1974). It was led by Niger's first President, Hamani Diori. After the end of military rule, the party reappeared as a minor parliamentary party led by Diori's son, Abdoulaye Hamani Diori.

Nigerien Self-Management Party Political party in Niger

The Nigerien Self-Management Party is a political party in Niger led by Sanoussi Jackou. "Al'ouma", the party's nickname, is an Arabic loan word meaning "Community" in Hausa.

Union for Democracy and the Republic (Niger) Political party in Niger

The Union for Democracy and the Republic is a political party in Niger. Its founding leaders were former Prime Minister Amadou Cissé and Amadou Madougou.

Rally for Democracy and Progress (Niger) Political party in Niger

The Rally for Democracy and Progress is a political party in Niger, led by Hamid Algabid. It was established as the ruling party during the presidency of Ibrahim Baré Maïnassara.

Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress Political party in Niger

The Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress is a political party in Niger. Moumouni Adamou Djermakoye led the party from its foundation in 1992 until his death in 2009.

Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism Political party in Niger

The Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism is a political party in Niger. It is a broadly left-leaning party, part of the Socialist International, and since 2011 it has been in power following the election of its long-time leader, Mahamadou Issoufou, as President. Mohamed Bazoum is President of the PNDS, and its Secretary-General is Foumakoye Gado.

National Assembly (Niger)

The unicameral National Assembly is Niger's legislative body. The National Assembly may propose laws and is required to approve all legislation.

Moumouni Adamou Djermakoye was a Nigerien politician and the President of the Nigerien Alliance for Democracy and Progress. He was an important minister during the regime of Seyni Kountché and subsequently served as Niger's Ambassador to the United States from 1988 to 1991; later, after founding the ANDP, he served as President of the National Assembly of Niger from 1993 to 1994. He was the ANDP's candidate in four presidential elections, beginning in 1993; he was also a deputy in the National Assembly from 1999 to 2009 and the President of the High Court of Justice from 2005 to 2009.

1999 Nigerien general election

General elections were held in Niger in 1999; the first-round of the presidential elections was held on 17 October, with a run-off held alongside National Assembly elections on 24 November. The elections followed a coup d'état on 9 April, in which Ibrahim Baré Maïnassara, who had led an earlier coup in January 1996 and won disputed presidential elections, was assassinated. Coup leader Daouda Mallam Wanké initiated a transitional period that concluded with the victory of Mamadou Tandja, the candidate of the National Movement for the Development of Society (MNSD), over Mahamadou Issoufou, the candidate of the Nigerien Party for Democracy and Socialism (PNDS), in the run-off. The vote for the first National Assembly of the Fifth Republic, which had originally been scheduled for October, but delayed in August, also saw a victory for the MNSD, which won 38 of the 83 seats. It formed a coalition with the Democratic and Social Convention in order to gain a majority in the Assembly.

Sawaba Political party in Niger

The Union of Popular Forces for Democracy and Progress–Sawaba is a political party in Niger, founded as the Nigerien Democratic Union in 1954. The original party, founded by Nigerien Progressive Party (PPN) co-leader Djibo Bakary when he was expelled from the PPN. In the mid-1950s it created a broad coalition led by urban leftists but forged of conservative rural notables, especially from Hausa areas, which dominated the nascent Nigerien independence movement. In this period it was renamed Mouvement Socialiste Africain–Sawaba, and then simply Sawaba. In pushing for complete independence from France in a 1958 referendum, the party fractured. At independence in 1960 it found itself in opposition and outlawed by Niger's first president, Hamani Diori. From exile, the party attempted an abortive guerrilla campaign in the mid-1960s, and then largely disappeared. Its leadership returned to Niger following the 1974 military coup, but soon found themselves arrested, in exile, or marginalised. Following the return of democracy in 1991, the now elderly Bakary re-founded the party as UDFP–Sawaba. In the 1993 elections it took only a small numbers of votes. Within the year the party had split, with a new faction (UDFR–Sawaba) joining the government coalition. Despite Bakary's death in 1998 and their continued electoral underachievement, both parties holding the Sawaba name continue.

Government of Niger

The government of Niger is the apparatus through which authority functions and is exercised: the governing apparatus of Nigerien state. The current system of governance, since the Constitution 18 July 1999, is termed the Fifth Republic of Niger. It is a semi-presidential republic, whereby the President of Niger is head of state and the Prime Minister of Niger head of government. The officials holding these posts are chosen through a representative democratic process of national and local elections, in the context of a competing multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government. Legislative power is vested in both the government and the National Assembly. The judiciary is independent of the executive and the legislature: its Constitutional Court has jurisdiction over constitutional and electoral matters.

Alliance of the Forces of Change

The Alliance of the Forces of Change was one of the two large political coalitions which contested for power in Niger from 1991 to 1996.

1995 Nigerien parliamentary election

Parliamentary elections were held in Niger on 12 January 1995. The last elections of the Third Republic, they were called following a split in the ruling coalition, but resulted in a government divided between the party of the President and an opposition coalition with a majority in the National Assembly and the post of Prime Minister. The ensuing stalemate was a contributing factor to the coup that overthrew the regime on 27 January 1996.

2011 Nigerien general election Election in Niger

General elections were held in Niger on 31 January 2011 to elect the President and National Assembly, with a second round of the presidential elections on 12 March. The first round of the presidential elections was originally scheduled to be held on 3 January and the second round on 31 January, but was later postponed. The elections followed a military coup in February 2010 that ousted President Mamadou Tandja.

2016 Nigerien general election

General elections were held in Niger on 21 February 2016, with a presidential run-off held on 20 March. A total of 15 candidates ran for the presidency, with incumbent President Mahamadou Issoufou running for re-election for a second term. There were two main opposition candidates also vying for the top post, Seyni Oumarou of the MNSD, who lost to Issoufou in 2011, and Hama Amadou of MODEN/FA, who has been campaigning from prison since November 2015. Most of the opposition agreed to align for the second round to back the second-placed candidate against Issoufou.

Movement for Democracy and Progress (Niger) Political party in Niger

The Movement for Democracy and Progress, also known as the Movement for Democracy and Pan-Africanism, is a political party in Niger.

References

  1. Elections in Niger African Elections database
  2. Nohlen, D, Krennerich, M & Thibaut, B (1999) Elections in Africa: A data handbook, p685 ISBN   0-19-829645-2
  3. "Niger". Election Passport. Retrieved 10 July 2017.