Baron Shuttleworth

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Gawthorpe Hall

Baron Shuttleworth, of Gawthorpe in the County Palatine of Lancaster, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 15 July 1902 for the Liberal politician Sir Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, 2nd Baronet. [1] [2] Both his sons were killed in the First World War and he was therefore succeeded by his grandson, the second Baron (eldest son of Hon. Lawrence Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, eldest son of the first Baron). However, both he and his brother, the third Baron, were killed in action during the Second World War. On the death of the third Baron in 1942 the titles passed to his first cousin, the fourth Baron (eldest son of the Hon. Edward Kay-Shuttleworth, second son of the first Baron), who survived the Second World War although he was badly wounded. As of 2017 the titles are held by the latter's son, the fifth Baron, who succeeded in 1975. He has been Lord Lieutenant of Lancashire since 1997.

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland until 1898.

Liberal Party (UK) political party of the United Kingdom, 1859–1988

The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s. By the end of the 19th century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone. Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1905 and then won a landslide victory in the following year's general election.

Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, 1st Baron Shuttleworth British landowner and politician

Ughtred James Kay-Shuttleworth, 1st Baron Shuttleworth,, known as Sir Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, Bt, between 1872 and 1902, was a British landowner and Liberal politician. He was Under-Secretary of State for India and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster under William Ewart Gladstone in 1886 and Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty under Gladstone and Lord Rosebery between 1892 and 1895.

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The Kay-Shuttleworth Baronetcy, of Gawthorpe in the County Palatine of Lancaster, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom in 1849 for the first Baronet, the physician, social reformer and educationalist James Kay-Shuttleworth. Born James Kay, he assumed by Royal licence the additional surname of Shuttleworth on his marriage in 1842 to Janet Shuttleworth, only child and heiress of Robert Shuttleworth of Gawthorpe Hall.

Gawthorpe Hall Grade I listed historic house museum in Lancashire, United Kingdom

Gawthorpe Hall is an Elizabethan country house on the banks of the River Calder, in the civil parish of Ightenhill in the Borough of Burnley, Lancashire, England. Its estate extends into Padiham, with the Stockbridge Drive entrance situated there. Since 1953 it has been designated a grade I listed building. The hall is financed and run by the National Trust in partnership with Lancashire County Council. In 2015 the Hall was given £500,000 funding from Lancashire County Council for vital restoration work needed on the south and west sides of the house.

Two of the first Baronet's brothers also gained distinction. Joseph Kay was a noted economist while Sir Edward Kay was a Lord Justice of Appeal.

Joseph Kay QC was an English economist and judge on the Northern Circuit.

Edward Ebenezer Kay British judge

Sir Edward Ebenezer Kay was a British jurist. He was an English High Court judge from 1881 to 1890, and a Lord Justice of Appeal from 1890, when he was made a Privy Councillor, until his retirement in January 1897.

The family seat was Gawthorpe Hall at Padiham near Burnley, Lancashire. The house was sold by the family in 1970. It is now financed and run by the National Trust in partnership with Lancashire County Council. [3] The present Baron lives at Leck Hall near Kirkby Lonsdale in north Lancashire.

Padiham town in Lancashire, England

Padiham is a small town and civil parish on the River Calder, about three miles (5 km) west of Burnley and south of Pendle Hill, in Lancashire, England. It is part of the Borough of Burnley, but has its own town council with varied powers. Padiham was originally a rural village lying by the River Calder. It is still surrounded by attractive countryside on an arc running from the north-west to the north-east in the foothills of Pendle Hill.

Burnley market town in Lancashire, England

Burnley is a town in Lancashire, England, with a 2001 population of 73,021. It is 21 miles (34 km) north of Manchester and 20 miles (32 km) east of Preston, at the confluence of the River Calder and River Brun.

Lancashire County of England

Lancashire is a ceremonial county in North West England. The administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians.

Kay-Shuttleworth Baronets, of Gawthorpe (1849)

Barons Shuttleworth (1902)

Charles Geoffrey Nicholas Kay-Shuttleworth, 5th Baron Shuttleworth, is a British hereditary peer. He is the son of Charles Ughtred Kay-Shuttleworth, 4th Baron Shuttleworth, and his wife, Anne Elizabeth Phillips.

The heir apparent is the present holder's son the Hon. Thomas Edward Kay-Shuttleworth (b. 1976)

Notes

  1. "No. 27455". The London Gazette . 18 July 1902. p. 4587.
  2. Young, Ken and Patricia L. Garside. "Metropolitan London, politics and urban change, 1837-1981". New York: Holmes & Meier, 1982, ISBN   978-0-8419-0798-0.
  3. National Trust website accessed 23 February 2013

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