Bill Battle

Last updated

Bill Battle
Bill Battle.jpg
Battle from the 1973 Volunteer
Biographical details
Born (1941-12-08) December 8, 1941 (age 79)
Birmingham, Alabama
Playing career
1960–1962 Alabama
Position(s) End
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1964–1965 Army (assistant)
1966–1969 Tennessee (ends)
1970–1976 Tennessee
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
2013–2017 Alabama
Head coaching record
Overall59–22–2
Bowls4–1

William Raines Battle III (born December 8, 1941) is an American former college athletics administrator and football coach. He was the athletic director of the University of Alabama from 2013 to 2017. He was appointed by University President Judy L. Bonner and approved by the board of trustees March 22, 2013. He succeeded long-time director Mal Moore, who stepped down for health reasons at age 73.

Contents

Career

Battle was formerly a licensing executive and a college football player and coach. He was the head football coach at the University of Tennessee from 1970 to 1976. At the time he began as head coach, he was at 29 the youngest college head coach in the country. A native of Birmingham, Alabama and a graduate of the University of Alabama, Battle was one of many of Bear Bryant's former players and assistant coaches who would later become head coaches.

Despite a 59–22–2 record in seven seasons in Knoxville in an era in which Alabama dominated the Southeastern Conference and annually contended for the national championship, Battle was forced out after the 1976 season, allowing Volunteer legend Johnny Majors to return to his alma mater after leading Pittsburgh to the 1976 national championship.

Battle is the founder and chairman of The Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC). In 1981, while working for Golden Eagle Enterprises in Selma, Alabama, Battle signed Paul "Bear" Bryant to a licensing agreement. The University of Alabama signed on as CLC’s first university client. In 1983, Battle moved the newly formed company to Atlanta, Georgia.

Battle is also a member of the group that votes in the Harris Interactive College Football Poll.

Personal life

Battle was born in Birmingham, Alabama. [1] Battle's father, William Raines "Bill" Battle Jr., was athletic director at Birmingham–Southern College from 1952 to 1974. [2] His grandfather William Raines Battle was a Methodist minister. [3] Battle was also inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa - the National Leadership Honor Society at the University of Alabama in 1962.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Tennessee Volunteers (Southeastern Conference)(1970–1976)
1970 Tennessee 11–14–12ndW Sugar 44
1971 Tennessee 10–24–2T–4thW Liberty 99
1972 Tennessee 10–24–24thW Astro-Bluebonnet 118
1973 Tennessee 8–43–34thL Gator 19
1974 Tennessee 7–3–22–3–1T–7thW Liberty 1520
1975 Tennessee 7–53–35th
1976 Tennessee 6–52–48th
Tennessee:59–22–222–18–1
Total:59–22–2

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References

  1. "Bill Battle". University of Alabama. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  2. "Birmingham has a connection to Bill Battle, who will be recommended to be next AD at Alabama". Birmingham News. AL.com. March 21, 2013. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  3. Spann, Kevin. "Laurie C. Battle". Encyclopedia of Alabama. Retrieved January 16, 2017.