1961 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

Last updated
1961 Alabama Crimson Tide football
Consensus national champion
Sugar Bowl champion
SEC co-champion
Sugar Bowl, W 10–3 vs. Arkansas
Conference Southeastern Conference
Ranking
CoachesNo. 1
APNo. 1
1961 record11–0 (7–0 SEC)
Head coach
Captains
Home stadium Denny Stadium
Legion Field
Ladd Stadium
Seasons
  1960
1962  
1961 Southeastern Conference football standings
Conf  Overall
TeamW L T  W L T
No. 1 Alabama +700  1100
No. 4 LSU +600  1010
No. 5 Ole Miss 510  920
No. 13 Georgia Tech 430  740
Tennessee 430  640
Florida 330  451
Auburn 340  640
Kentucky 240  550
Georgia 250  370
Mississippi State 150  550
Tulane 150  280
Vanderbilt 160  280
  • + Conference co-champions
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1961 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA" or "Bama") represented the University of Alabama in the 1961 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 67th overall and 28th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished season undefeated with eleven wins (11–0 overall, 7–0 in the SEC), with a victory over Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl and as consensus national champions. [1] The 1961 national championship was the first of the six that Bear Bryant would win as head coach of the Crimson Tide. [2]

Contents

Alabama opened the season with a win over Georgia on the road in week one, and then defeated Tulane in their home game at Ladd Stadium in week two. After they won their second road game of the season at Vanderbilt, Alabama returned to Tuscaloosa where they defeated NC State in the first Denny Stadium game of the season. The next week, Alabama defeated Tennessee for the first time since the 1954 season in the first Legion Field game of the year.

The Crimson Tide then defeated Houston in their final road game of the season and then returned home and defeated Mississippi State on homecoming in Tuscaloosa. The next week Alabama scored their most points in a game since the 1951 season when they defeated Richmond 66–0. They then closed the regular season with wins over Georgia Tech and Auburn in the Iron Bowl and captured the national championship as awarded by the major wire services. The Crimson Tide then closed the season with a victory over Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl.

Schedule

DateOpponentRankSiteTVResultAttendance
September 23at Georgia No. 3W 32–644,000
September 30 Tulane No. 4W 9–033,000
October 7at Vanderbilt No. 4W 35–632,500
October 14 NC State *No. 3W 26–730,000
October 21 Tennessee No. 5 ABC W 34–348,000
October 28at Houston *No. 4W 17–024,000
November 4 Mississippi State Dagger-14-plain.pngNo. 4W 24–039,000
November 11 Richmond *No. 2W 66–028,000
November 18 Georgia Tech No. 2W 10–053,000
December 2vs. Auburn No. 1W 34–054,000
January 1, 1962vs. No. 9 Arkansas *No. 1 NBC W 10–382,910
  • *Non-conference game
  • Dagger-14-plain.pngHomecoming
  • Rankings from AP Poll released prior to the game

Game summaries

Georgia

1234Total
#3 Alabama3771532
Georgia00066
  • Date: September 23
  • Location: Sanford Stadium
    Athens, Georgia
  • Game attendance: 44,000

To open the 1961 season, the Crimson Tide defeated the Georgia Bulldogs 32–6 on the road at Athens. [4] [5] [6] Alabama took a 10–0 halftime lead after Tim Davis connected on a 41-yard field goal in the first quarter and Mike Fracchia scored on a one-yard touchdown run in the second quarter. [4] [5] After a 37-yard Pat Trammell touchdown pass to Butch Wilson in the third, the Crimson Tide scored a pair of fourth-quarter touchdowns that extended their lead to 32–0. [4] [5] Fracchia scored first on a two-yard run and was followed with a seven-yard Mal Moore touchdown pass to Red Wilkins. [4] [5] The Bulldogs then scored on a 12-yard Langdale Williams touchdown pass to Carlton Guthrie that ended Alabama's bid for a shutout and made the final score 32–6. [4] [5] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Georgia to 25–18–4. [7]

Tulane

1234Total
Tulane00000
#4 Alabama60039
  • Date: September 30
  • Location: Ladd Stadium
    Mobile, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 33,000

After their victory over Georgia in their season opener, Alabama dropped one position in the polls to the No. 4 position. [10] At Mobile, the Crimson Tide shutout the Tulane Green Wave for the first time since the 1959 season in this 9–0 victory. [6] [8] [9] Alabama scored their only touchdown in the first quarter on a 22-yard Pat Trammell pass to Tommy Brooker for a 6–0 lead. [8] [9] The Crimson Tide did not score again until a 25-yard Tim Davis field goal in the fourth quarter made the final score 9–0. [8] [9] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Tulane to 19–10–3. [11]

Vanderbilt

1234Total
#4 Alabama13157035
Vanderbilt06006
  • Date: October 7
  • Location: Dudley Field
    Nashville, Tennessee
  • Game attendance: 32,500

After their victory over Tulane at Ladd Stadium, Alabama retained the No. 4 position in the AP Poll prior to their game against Vanderbilt. [14] Against the Commodores, the Crimson Tide won by a final score of 35–6 at Dudley Stadium in Nashville. [6] [12] [13] Alabama took a 13–0 first quarter lead on touchdown runs of 66-yards by Mike Fracchia and eight-yards by Pat Trammell. [12] [13] Early in the second quarter, Trammell scored his second touchdown on a 16-yard run. This was followed with a 13-yard Henry Lesesne touchdown pass to Marion Starling for the Commodores and a one-yard Larry Wall touchdown run for Alabama that made the halftime score 28–6. [12] [13] Trammell then scored the final touchdown of the game in the third on a three-yard run that made the final score 35–6. [12] [13] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Vanderbilt to 20–16–4. [15]

NC State

1234Total
NC State07007
#3 Alabama01201426
  • Date: October 14
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 30,000

After their victory over Vanderbilt, Alabama moved up one position in the polls to the No. 3 spot prior to their first Denny Stadium game of the season. [18] In what was their first non-conference game of the season, Alabama defeated the NC State Wolfpack 26–7 in Tuscaloosa. [6] [16] [17] After a scoreless first quarter, the Wolfpack scored their only points of the game on a one-yard Roman Gabriel touchdown run for a 7–0 lead. [16] [17] The Crimson Tide responded with 26 unanswered points and won the game 26–7. Alabama touchdowns were scored on Pat Trammell passes of 12-yards to Richard Williamson and two-yards to Bill Battle in the second and on runs of five-yards by Trammell and 45-yards by Eddie Versprille in the fourth quarter. [16] [17] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against NC State to 2–0. [19]

Tennessee

Third Saturday in October
1234Total
Tennessee30003
#5 Alabama1467734
  • Date: October 21
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 48,000

Prior to their game against Tennessee, Alabama dropped two positions in the polls to the No. 5 spot prior to their first Legion Field game of the season. [22] Against the Volunteers, Alabama won 34–3, and the victory was both the first for Alabama over Tennessee since the 1954 season and the largest since their 51–0 win in 1906. [6] [20] [21] After Tennessee took an early 3–0 lead on a 53-yard George Shuford field goal, Alabama responded with 34 unanswered points. [20] [21] The Crimson Tide scored first-quarter touchdowns on a five-yard Mike Fracchia run and a nine-yard Pat Trammell pass to Butch Wilson and a pair of Tim Davis field goals in the second quarter for a 20–3 halftime lead. [20] [21] They then closed the game with touchdown runs of eight-yards by Billy Richardson in the third and one-yard by Trammell in the fourth quarter. [20] [21] After their win, Alabama was formally extended an invitation to compete in the inaugural National Trophy Bowl at Washington, D.C., only to later decline the invitation. [23] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Tennessee to 19–19–6. [24]

Houston

1234Total
#4 Alabama0107017
Houston00000
  • Date: October 28
  • Location: Rice Stadium
    Houston, Texas
  • Game attendance: 24,000

After their victory over Tennessee, the Crimson Tide moved up into the No. 4 position in the polls prior to their road game at Houston. [27] In the first night game of the year, Alabama defeated a tough Cougars squad 17–0 at Rice Stadium. [6] [25] [26] After a scoreless first quarter, the Crimson Tide took a 10–0 halftime lead on a 33-yard Tim Davis field goal and a five-yard Pat Trammell touchdown pass to Bill Oliver in the second quarter. [25] [26] Trammell then made the final score 17–0 with his two-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. [25] [26] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Houston to 3–0. [28]

Mississippi State

1234Total
Mississippi State00000
#4 Alabama1430724
  • Date: November 4
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 39,000

After their road shutout at Houston, Alabama returned to play Mississippi State in Tuscaloosa as the No. 4 ranked team for the second consecutive week. [31] On what was homecoming in Denny Stadium, the Crimson Tide shutout the Bulldogs 24–0. [6] [29] [30] Alabama took a 14–0 first quarter lead on touchdown runs of four-yards by Billy Richardson and one-yard by Pat Trammell, and after a 26-yard Tim Davis field goal in the second quarter led 17–0 at halftime. [29] [30] After a scoreless third quarter, the Crimson Tide closed the game with a one-yard Larry Wall touchdown run in the fourth quarter and made the final score 24–0. [29] [30] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Mississippi State to 33–10–3. [32]

Richmond

1234Total
Richmond00000
#2 Alabama1420131966
  • Date: November 11
  • Location: Denny Stadium
    Tuscaloosa, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 28,000

Prior to their game against Richmond, the Crimson Tide moved into the No. 2 position in the weekly polls. [35] In what was the only all-time meeting against the Spiders, Alabama won 66–0 and scored the most points in a game since their 89–0 win over Delta State in 1951. [6] [33] [34] [36] The Crimson Tide took a 34–0 halftime lead after first-quarter touchdown runs of one-yard by Pat Trammell and 30-yards by Larry Wall and second-quarter touchdowns on a four-yard Trammell pass to Richard Williamson and runs of 12 and one-yard by Wall. [33] [34] Alabama then closed the game with five second half touchdowns and won 66–0. Touchdowns were scored in the third quarter on a 66-yard Benny Nelson punt return and a 26-yard Jack Hurlbut pass to Red Wilkins and in the fourth quarter on runs of three-yards by Eddie Versprille, two-yards by Marlin Mooneyham and on a 28-yard Mal Moore pass to Jimmy Dill. [33] [34]

Georgia Tech

1234Total
Georgia Tech00000
#2 Alabama073010
  • Date: November 18
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 53,000

For their game at Legion Field against Georgia Tech, the Crimson Tide remained in the No. 2 position in the national polls. [39] Against the Yellow Jackets, Alabama won in a 10–0 shutout to move their record to nine wins and zero losses. [6] [37] [38] After a scoreless first quarter, the Crimson Tide scored their only touchdown on a 16-yard Mike Fracchia run for a 7–0 lead. Tim Davis then made the final score 10–0 with his 32-yard field goal in the third quarter. [37] [38] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Georgia Tech to 22–18–3. [40]

Auburn

Iron Bowl
1234Total
Auburn00000
#1 Alabama7177334
  • Date: December 2
  • Location: Legion Field
    Birmingham, Alabama
  • Game attendance: 54,000

After their win over Tech combined with No. 1 Texas' loss to TCU, the Crimson Tide moved into the No. 1 position in the polls prior to their game against Auburn. [43] Against the Tigers in the annual Iron Bowl game at Legion Field, Alabama shutout Auburn for the third consecutive season, this time by a score of 34–0 and completed an undefeated regular season. [6] [41] [42] After Billy Richardson gave Alabama a 7–0 first quarter lead with his 11-yard touchdown run, they scored 17 second quarter points and took a 24–0 halftime lead. [41] [42] In the second, Pat Trammell scored on a one-yard run, Tim Davis connected on a 35-yard field goal and Trammell threw a 19-yard touchdown pass to Richard Williamson. [41] [42] Alabama then closed the game with a six-yard Richardson touchdown run in the third and a 34-yard field goal in the fourth to win 34–0. [41] [42] The victory improved Alabama's all-time record against Auburn to 12–13–1. [44]

Arkansas

1962 Sugar Bowl
1234Total
#9 Arkansas00303
#1 Alabama730010
  • Date: January 1, 1962
  • Location: Tulane Stadium
    New Orleans
  • Game attendance: 82,910

After the Crimson Tide was recognized as national champions by the major wire services, they defeated the Arkansas Razorbacks 10–3 in the 1962 edition of the Sugar Bowl in what was the first all-time meeting between the schools. [45] [46] [47] The Crimson Tide took a 10–0 halftime lead after they scored on a 12-yard Pat Trammell touchdown run in the first quarter and on a 32-yard Tim Davis field goal in the second quarter. [45] [46] Although Alabama was held scoreless in the second half, the Razorbacks only managed to score a 23-yard Mickey Cissell field goal in the third quarter that made the final score 10–3 in favor of Alabama. [45] [46]

Awards

After the season, Alabama had several players recognized individually for their on-field performances. Billy Neighbors was a unanimous selection to the 1961 College Football All-America Team at the tackle position. [48] Second Team All-America selections included Lee Roy Jordan at center and Pat Trammell at quarterback. [49] Additionally, Alabama had four players selected to the All-SEC First Team: Mike Fracchia at back, Jordan, Neighbors and Trammell. [49] [50] Trammell was also selected as the SEC Most Valuable Player for the 1961 season and Neighbors won the Jacobs Blocking Trophy. [51] In having led his team to both the SEC and national championships, Bear Bryant was recognized as the AP, UPI and coaches' SEC Coach of the Year. [51]

NFL/AFL Draft

Several players that were varsity lettermen from the 1961 squad were drafted into the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL) between the 1962 and 1965 drafts. These players included the following:

YearRoundOverallPlayer namePositionNFL/AFL team
1962 NFL Draft
[52]
443 Billy Neighbors Tackle Washington Redskins
569Bill RiceEnd St. Louis Cardinals
16211 Tommy Brooker EndWashington Redskins
16219 Ray Abruzzese Running back Baltimore Colts
1962 AFL Draft
[53]
539Bill RiceEndHouston Oilers
646 Billy Neighbors Guard Boston Patriots
17131 Tommy Brooker End Dallas Texans
23180 Ray Abruzzese Safety Buffalo Bills
24187 Pat Trammell QuarterbackDallas Texans
1963 NFL Draft
[52]
16 Lee Roy Jordan Linebacker Dallas Cowboys
224 Butch Wilson BackBaltimore Colts
333Mike FracchiaBackSt. Louis Cardinals
1963 AFL Draft
[54]
214 Lee Roy Jordan LinebackerBoston Patriots
641 Butch Wilson Tight end Oakland Raiders
755 Richard Williamson EndBoston Patriots
1964 NFL Draft
[52]
561Benny NelsonHalfback Detroit Lions
11151Eddie VersprilleRunning back Cleveland Browns
1964 AFL Draft
[55]
1294Benny NelsonDefensive back Houston Oilers

Freshman squad

Prior to the 1972 NCAA University Division football season, NCAA rules prohibited freshmen from participating on the varsity team, and as such many schools fielded freshmen teams. [56] [57] For the 1961 season, the Alabama freshmen squad was coached by Sam Bailey and finished their season with a record of two wins and one tie (2–0–1). [58] The 1961 freshman squad was noted for its being led by Joe Namath at quarterback after he chose to attend Alabama after he received more than 50 athletic scholarship offers from other schools. [59]

In their first game of the season, Alabama came from behind and defeated Mississippi State 20–14 before 3,500 fans at Denny Stadium. [60] After the Bulldogs took a 7–0 first quarter lead on a six-yard Ray Reed pass to Tommy Inman, Alabama tied the game 7–7 on an eight-yard Namath touchdown run early in the second. The Crimson Tide then took a 13–7 halftime lead on a nine-yard Namath pass to Creed Gilmer late in the second. [60] State retook a 14–13 lead in the third on an eight-yard Reed to Inman pass, but Alabama scored the game-winning touchdown on a 36-yard Ron McKinney run that made the final score 20–13. [60]

In their second game, the Baby Tide defeated Tulane 32–6 at Denny Stadium in a game they scored touchdowns in all four quarters. [61] After the Green Wave scored their only points on the first play of the game when Leon Verriere recovered the fumbled kickoff in the end zone for a touchdown, Alabama responded on the next drive and tied the game 6–6 after Namath threw an 11-yard touchdown pass to Ray Ogden. [61] The Crimson Tide then took a 12–6 lead in the second quarter on a 26-yard Tommy Tolleson double reverse. Alabama then closed the game with a pair of Namath touchdown runs and a touchdown pass to Creed Gilmer in the second half that made the final score 32–6. [61]

In their final game of the season, Alabama tied the Auburn freshman team 7–7 before 7,000 fans in the rain at Cliff Hare Stadium. [58] Both touchdowns came in the first quarter. Alabama took a 7–0 lead when Namath threw a 46-yard touchdown pass to Creed Gilmer, and Auburn tied the game 7–7 on the kickoff that ensued after Tucker Frederickson returned it 92-yards for a touchdown. [58]

Personnel

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The 1969 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1969 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 75th overall and 36th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his 12th year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished season with six wins and five losses and with a loss against Colorado in the Liberty Bowl.

The 1950 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1950 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 56th overall and 17th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his fourth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of nine wins and two losses.

The 1954 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1954 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 60th overall and 21st season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his eighth year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham, Ladd Stadium in Mobile and at the Cramton Bowl in Montgomery, Alabama. They finished with a record of four wins, five losses and two ties.

The 1957 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1957 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 63rd overall and 24th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Jennings B. Whitworth, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of two wins, seven losses and one tie.

The 1958 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1958 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 64th overall and 25th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of five wins, four losses and one tie. As they finished the season above .500, Alabama secured its first winning season since 1953, and their five victories gave Bryant more wins games in one season than former head coach Jennings B. Whitworth did in previous three.

The 1959 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1959 NCAA University Division football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 65th overall and 26th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Bear Bryant, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and at Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of seven wins, two losses and two ties and with a loss against Penn State in the inaugural Liberty Bowl.

The 1933 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1933 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 40th overall and 1st season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his third year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of seven wins, one loss and one tie, and as the first SEC champions.

The 1937 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1937 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 44th overall and 5th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Frank Thomas, in his seventh year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of nine wins and one loss, as SEC champions and with a loss against California in the 1938 Rose Bowl.

The 1947 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1947 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 53rd overall and 14th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his first year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa and Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama. They finished with a record of eight wins and three losses and with a loss in the Sugar Bowl.

The 1948 Alabama Crimson Tide football team represented the University of Alabama in the 1948 college football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 54th overall and 15th season as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team was led by head coach Harold Drew, in his second year, and played their home games at Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Legion Field in Birmingham and Ladd Stadium in Mobile, Alabama. They finished with a record of six wins, four losses and one tie.

References

General

Specific

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