Cockpit (sailing)

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Cockpit of a small sailing boat Cockpit.jpg
Cockpit of a small sailing boat

A cockpit is a name for the location of controls of a vessel; while traditionally an open well in the deck of a boat outside any deckhouse or cabin, [1] in modern boats they may refer to an enclosed area. [2] Smaller boats typically have an aft cockpit, towards the stern of the boat, whereas larger vessels may provide a center cockpit with greater protection from weather. [2] On a recreational sailboat, the cockpit is considered the most safe external location for crew. [3]

A bridge deck is a raised separation between an external cockpit and cabin or saloon, used to keep water from astern from entering from the cockpit, especially in following seas. [4]

History

In the Royal Navy, the term cockpit originally referred to the area where the coxswain was stationed. This led to the word being used to refer to the area towards the stern of a small decked vessel that houses the rudder controls. The midshipmen and master's mates were later berthed in the cockpit, and it served as the action station for the ship's surgeon and his mates during battle. [5]

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years' War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

The coxswain is the person in charge of a boat, particularly its navigation and steering. The etymology of the word gives a literal meaning of "boat servant" since it comes from cock, a cockboat or other small vessel kept aboard a ship, and swain, an Old English term derived from the Old Norse sveinn meaning boy or servant.

Master's mate is an obsolete rating which was used by the Royal Navy, United States Navy and merchant services in both countries for a senior petty officer who assisted the master. Master's mates evolved into the modern rank of Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Navy, while in the merchant service they evolved into the numbered mates or officers.

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Boat vessel for transport by water

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Hull (watercraft) watertight body of a ship or boat

A hull is the watertight body of a ship or boat. The hull may open at the top, or it may be fully or partially covered with a deck. Atop the deck may be a deckhouse and other superstructures, such as a funnel, derrick, or mast. The line where the hull meets the water surface is called the waterline.

Seamanship is the art of operating a ship or boat.

Narrowboat type of English boat, designed to fit in narrow canals

A narrowboat or narrow boat is a boat of a distinctive design, made to fit the narrow canals of the United Kingdom.

Boat building construction and engineering of boats

Boat building is the design and construction of boats and their systems. This includes at a minimum a hull, with propulsion, mechanical, navigation, safety and other systems as a craft requires.

Cutter (boat) type of watercraft designed for speed

A cutter is generally a small to medium-sized vessel, depending on its role and definition. Historically, it was a smallish single- or double-masted, decked sailcraft designed for speed rather than capacity. As such, it was gaff-rigged, with two or more headsails and often a bowsprit of some length, with a mast sometimes set farther back than on a sloop. While historically a workboat, as used by harbor pilots, the military, and privateers, sailing cutters today are most commonly fore-and-aft rigged private yachts.

Fishing trawler commercial fishing vessel designed to operate fishing trawls

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Deck (ship) part of a ship or boat

A deck is a permanent covering over a compartment or a hull of a ship. On a boat or ship, the primary or upper deck is the horizontal structure that forms the "roof" of the hull, strengthening it and serving as the primary working surface. Vessels often have more than one level both within the hull and in the superstructure above the primary deck, similar to the floors of a multi-storey building, that are also referred to as decks, as are certain compartments and decks built over specific areas of the superstructure. Decks for some purposes have specific names.

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Aft

Aft, in naval terminology, is an adjective or adverb meaning, towards the stern (rear) of the ship, when the frame of reference is within the ship, headed at the fore. Example: "Able Seaman Smith; lay aft!". Or; "What's happening aft?"

Quarterdeck raised deck behind the main mast of a sailing ship

The quarterdeck is a raised deck behind the main mast of a sailing ship. Traditionally it was where the captain commanded his vessel and where the ship's colours were kept. This led to its use as the main ceremonial and reception area on board, and the word is still used to refer to such an area on a ship or even in naval establishments on land. Many such facilities have areas decorated like shipboard quarterdecks.

A lazarette is a special area on a boat. It is often an area near or aft of the cockpit. The word is similar to and probably derived from lazaretto. A lazarette is usually a storage locker used for gear or equipment a sailor or boatswain would use around the decks on a sailing vessel.

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Fishing vessel boat or ship used to catch fish on a body of water

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Whaleback type of cargo steamship

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MS <i>Nordkapp</i>

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Lifeboat (shipboard) boat used primarily as an emergency means of leaving a larger boat or ship in case of emergency

A lifeboat or life raft is a small, rigid or inflatable boat carried for emergency evacuation in the event of a disaster aboard a ship. Lifeboat drills are required by law on larger commercial ships. Rafts (liferafts) are also used. In the military, a lifeboat may double as a whaleboat, dinghy, or gig. The ship's tenders of cruise ships often double as lifeboats. Recreational sailors usually carry inflatable life rafts, though a few prefer small proactive lifeboats that are harder to sink and can be sailed to safety.

Stern back or aft-most part of a ship or boat

The stern is the back or aft-most part of a ship or boat, technically defined as the area built up over the sternpost, extending upwards from the counter rail to the taffrail. The stern lies opposite of the bow, the foremost part of a ship. Originally, the term only referred to the aft port section of the ship, but eventually came to refer to the entire back of a vessel. The stern end of a ship is indicated with a white navigation light at night.

References

  1. Husick, Charles. Chapman Piloting & Seamanship (66th ed.). Hearst Books. p. 25.
  2. 1 2 Nicholas, Mark (2005). The Essentials of Living Aboard a Boat: The Definitive Guide for Liveaboards. Paradise Cay Publications. ISBN   9780939837663.
  3. Jobson, Gary (1998). Sailing Fundamentals. Simon & Schuster. ISBN   0684849941.
  4. Simon, Alvah (11 March 2014). "Companionway Design: Down The (Main) Hatch". Cruising World. Retrieved 27 March 2016.
  5. "Cockpit". Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1976.