Dawn Wright

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Dawn Jeannine Wright
Biophoto2.jpg
Born (1961-04-15) April 15, 1961 (age 57)
NationalityAmerican
Alma mater UCSB, Texas A&M University, Wheaton College (Illinois)
Known forOcean GIS, data modeling
Awards
Scientific career
Fields Geography, oceanography
Institutions Esri, Oregon State University
Doctoral advisor Raymond C. Smith
Other academic advisors Michael Frank Goodchild, Ken C. Macdonald, Rachel Haymon

Dawn Jeannine Wright (born April 15, 1961) is an American geographer and oceanographer. She is a leading authority in the application of geographic information system (GIS) technology to the field of ocean and coastal science, and played a key role in creating the first GIS data model for the oceans. [1] Wright is Chief Scientist of the Environmental Systems Research Institute (aka Esri). [2] [3] She has also been a professor of geography and oceanography at Oregon State University since 1995 and is a former Oregon Professor of the Year as named by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. [4] [5] Wright was the first African-American female to dive to the ocean floor in the deep submersible ALVIN. [6] [7]

Geographer scholar whose area of study is geography

A geographer is a scientist whose area of study is geography, the study of Earth's natural environment and human society. The Greek prefix, "geo," means "earth" and the Greek suffix, "graphy," meaning "description," so a geographer is someone who studies the earth. The word "geography" is a Middle French word that is believed to have been first used in 1540.

Esri company

Esri is an international supplier of geographic information system (GIS) software, web GIS and geodatabase management applications. The company is headquartered in Redlands, California.

Oregon State University public university in Corvallis, Oregon, United States

Oregon State University (OSU) is a public research university in Corvallis, Oregon. The university offers more than 200 undergraduate degree programs along with a variety of graduate and doctoral degrees. It is also the largest university in the state, with a total enrollment exceeding 28,000. More than 230,000 students have graduated from OSU since its founding. The Carnegie Foundation designates Oregon State University as a "Community Engagement" university and classifies it as a doctoral university with a status of "Highest research activity".

Contents

Education

Wright earned a Bachelor of Science cum laude in geology from Wheaton College (Illinois) in 1983, a Master of Science in oceanography from Texas A&M University in 1986, and an Individual Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Physical Geography and Marine Geology from UCSB. [8] [9] [10] In 2007 she received a Distinguished Alumna Award from UCSB [11] and was also a UCSB College of Letters and Science commencement speaker. [12]

Wheaton College (Illinois) Christian liberal arts college in Wheaton, Illinois

Wheaton College is a Christian, residential liberal arts college and graduate school in Wheaton, Illinois. The Protestant college was founded by evangelical abolitionists in 1860. Wheaton College was a stop on the Underground Railroad and graduated one of Illinois' first African-American college graduates.

Texas A&M University public research university in College Station, Texas, United States

Texas A&M University is a public research university in College Station, Texas, United States. It is a state flagship university and since 1948 is the founding member of the Texas A&M University System. The Texas A&M system endowment is among the 10 largest endowments in the nation. As of 2017, Texas A&M's student body is the largest in Texas and the second largest in the United States. Texas A&M's designation as a land, sea, and space grant institution–the only university in Texas to hold all three designations–reflects a range of research with ongoing projects funded by organizations such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval Research. In 2001, Texas A&M was inducted as a member of the Association of American Universities. The school's students, alumni—over 450,000 strong—and sports teams are known as Aggies. The Texas A&M Aggies athletes compete in 18 varsity sports as a member of the Southeastern Conference.

Career

Wright's research interests are mapping of seafloor spreading zones and coral reefs, spatial analysis and geographic information systems as applied to the marine environment. She co-edited one of the first books on marine GIS [13] and is widely known as one of the most influential researchers in this area. [14] [15] [16] Another influential work was a 1997 article [17] widely cited for its analysis of the perception of GIS among geographers in the early 1990s. [18] [19]

Seafloor spreading A process at mid-ocean ridges, where new oceanic crust is formed through volcanic activity and then gradually moves away from the ridge

Seafloor spreading is a process that occurs at mid-ocean ridges, where new oceanic crust is formed through volcanic activity and then gradually moves away from the ridge.

Spatial analysis Formal techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties

Spatial analysis or spatial statistics includes any of the formal techniques which study entities using their topological, geometric, or geographic properties. Spatial analysis includes a variety of techniques, many still in their early development, using different analytic approaches and applied in fields as diverse as astronomy, with its studies of the placement of galaxies in the cosmos, to chip fabrication engineering, with its use of "place and route" algorithms to build complex wiring structures. In a more restricted sense, spatial analysis is the technique applied to structures at the human scale, most notably in the analysis of geographic data.

Wright began her career as a seagoing marine technician for the Ocean Drilling Program, sailing on ten 2-month expeditions from 1986 to 1989 aboard the JOIDES Resolution, mostly throughout the Indian and Pacific Oceans. [20] [21] [22] Her most prominent service has included the National Academy of Sciences Ocean Studies Board, [23] the Science Advisory Board of NOAA, [24] the Science Advisory Board of the EPA, [25] the National Council of the American Association of Geographers, and Research Chair and Board Member of the University Consortium for Geographic Information Science. [26] A strong advocate of STEM as well as science communication, she has been profiled by outlets such as Women Oceanographers.org, [27] The Oceanography Society, [28] The Atlantic, [29] NOAA's Sea Grant Program, [30] NOAA's National Marine Sanctuaries Program, [31] Science magazine, [32] Harvard Design magazine, [33] Environment, Coastal & Offshore (ECO) magazine, [34] The HistoryMakers, [35] Let Science Speak, [36] COMPASS Blogs, [37] Ensia, [38] "Nature" News, [39] "BBC" radio [40] and a host of student projects (e.g., [41] ).

Ocean Drilling Program Marine research program between 1985–2003

The Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) was a multinational effort to explore and study the composition and structure of the Earth's oceanic basins. ODP, which began in 1985, was the successor to the Deep Sea Drilling Project initiated in 1968 by the United States. ODP was an international effort with contributions of Australia, Germany, France, Japan, the United Kingdom and the ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) including 12 further countries. The program used the drillship JOIDES Resolution on 110 expeditions (legs) to collect about 2000 deep sea cores from major geological features located in the ocean basins of the world. Drilling discoveries led to further questions and hypotheses, as well as to new disciplines in earth sciences such as the field of paleoceanography. In 2004 ODP transformed into the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP).

JOIDES Resolution

The riserless research vessel JOIDES Resolution, often referred to as the JR, is one of the scientific drilling ships used by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), an international, multi-drilling platform research program. The JR was previously the main research ship used during the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) and was used along with the Japanese drilling vessel Chikyu and other mission-specific drilling platforms throughout the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. She is the successor of Glomar Challenger.

National Academy of Sciences science branch of the United States National Academies

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a United States nonprofit, non-governmental organization. NAS is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM).

Awards and honors

Wright is an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science [42] [43] and of the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program. [44] [45] Other honors include:

American Association for the Advancement of Science international non-profit organization promoting science

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an American international non-profit organization with the stated goals of promoting cooperation among scientists, defending scientific freedom, encouraging scientific responsibility, and supporting scientific education and science outreach for the betterment of all humanity. It is the world's largest general scientific society, with over 120,000 members, and is the publisher of the well-known scientific journal Science, which had a weekly circulation of 138,549 in 2008.

Selected publications

Wright has authored nearly 70 peer-reviewed journal articles and 7 books. A selection is listed here.

Related Research Articles

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration An American scientific agency within the US Department of Commerce that focuses on the oceans and the atmosphere

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is an American scientific agency within the United States Department of Commerce that focuses on the conditions of the oceans, major waterways, and the atmosphere.

Oceanography The study of the physical and biological aspects of the ocean

Oceanography, also known as oceanology, is the study of the physical and biological aspects of the ocean. It is an Earth science, which covers a wide range of topics, including ecosystem dynamics; ocean currents, waves, and geophysical fluid dynamics; plate tectonics and the geology of the sea floor; and fluxes of various chemical substances and physical properties within the ocean and across its boundaries. These diverse topics reflect multiple disciplines that oceanographers blend to further knowledge of the world ocean and understanding of processes within: astronomy, biology, chemistry, climatology, geography, geology, hydrology, meteorology and physics. Paleoceanography studies the history of the oceans in the geologic past.

Don Walsh American oceanographer

Don Walsh is an American oceanographer, explorer and marine policy specialist. He and Jacques Piccard were aboard the bathyscaphe Trieste when it made a record maximum descent into the Mariana Trench on January 23, 1960, the deepest point of the world's oceans. The depth was measured at 35,813 feet (10,916 m), but later and more accurate measurements have measured it at 35,798 feet.

Waldo R. Tobler American geographer

Waldo Rudolph Tobler was an American-Swiss geographer and cartographer. Tobler's idea that "Everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things" is referred to as the "first law of geography." He has proposed a second law as well: "The phenomenon external to an area of interest affects what goes on inside". Tobler was an active Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Santa Barbara Department of Geography until his death.

A research vessel is a ship or boat designed, modified, or equipped to carry out research at sea. Research vessels carry out a number of roles. Some of these roles can be combined into a single vessel but others require a dedicated vessel. Due to the demanding nature of the work, research vessels are often constructed around an icebreaker hull, allowing them to operate in polar waters.

Michael Frank Goodchild American geographer

Michael Frank Goodchild is a British-American geographer. He is an Emeritus Professor of Geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. After nineteen years at the University of Western Ontario, including three years as chair, he moved to Santa Barbara in 1988, as part of the establishment of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, which he directed for over 20 years. In 2008, he founded the UCSB Center for Spatial Studies.

Jack Dangermond American businessman

Jack Dangermond is an American billionaire businessman and environmental scientist. In 1969, he co-founded with his wife Laura the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), a privately held geographic information systems (GIS) software company.

The Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) is a laboratory in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR). It is one of seven NOAA Research Laboratories (RLs). The PMEL is split across two sites in the Pacific Northwest, in Seattle, Washington and Newport, Oregon.

Roger Tomlinson English geographer

Roger F. Tomlinson, was an English geographer and the primary originator of modern computerised geographic information systems (GIS), and has been acknowledged as the "father of GIS."

RV <i>Oceanus</i>

RV Oceanus is a Regional Class research vessel owned by the National Science Foundation. The ship was delivered to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) for operation as a part of the University-National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS) fleet in November, 1975. Oceanus made her first operational cruise in April, 1976 and operated under WHOI for thirty-six years in the Atlantic with some operations in the Mediterranean and Caribbean. The ship was scheduled to be retired in November 2011 but instead was transferred to Oregon State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, for operation, replacing her sister ship, R/V Wecoma.

Jane Lubchenco American ecologist

Jane Lubchenco is an American environmental scientist and marine ecologist who teaches and does research at Oregon State University. Her research interests include interactions between the environment and human well-being, biodiversity, climate change, and sustainable use of oceans and the planet. From 2009 to 2013, she served as Administrator of NOAA and Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere.

Anne Kelly Knowles is an American geographer and a specialist in Historical GIS. After teaching for over ten years at Middlebury College in Vermont as a professor of geography, she is now a professor of history at University of Maine.

Hatfield Marine Science Center university

Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) is a marine science research and education center next to Yaquina Bay of the Pacific Ocean in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is operated by Oregon State University (OSU) in cooperation with five state and federal agencies co-located on site. Named after Mark Hatfield, a former U.S. Senator from Oregon, the HMSC occupies a 49-acre (20 ha) site in Newport. The Hatfield Marine Science Center campus is the future site of the new Oregon State University Marine Studies Initiative building, with a proposed year-round undergraduate student body of 500 students.

Esri International User Conference Geographic information system technology event

Produced by the Environmental Systems Research Institute, the Esri International User Conference is the world's largest event dedicated to geographic information system (GIS) technology. It is held annually in the United States, usually for one week in July at the San Diego Convention Center in San Diego, California. The Esri UC dates back to 1981. In 2008, conference attendance grew to more than 14,000 attendees.

Warren M. Washington is an American atmospheric scientist, a former chair of the National Science Board, and currently senior scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado.

D. James Baker American scientist

Donald James Baker is an American scientist who was trained as a physicist, practiced as an oceanographer, and has held science and management positions in academia, non-profit institutions, and government agencies. He a former Under Secretary of Commerce for Atmosphere and Oceans and Administrator of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and currently Director, Global Carbon Measurement Program, William J. Clinton Foundation working with forestry programs in developing countries with the aim of reducing carbon dioxide emissions and at the same time helping alleviate poverty.

Nancy N. Rabalais is an American marine ecologist. Born in Wichita Falls, Texas, she is the daughter of Kathryn Charlotte Preusch and Stephen Anthony Nash, a mechanical engineer, and the second of four children. She researches dead zones in the marine environment and is an expert in eutrophication and nutrient pollution.

Kelly Kenison Falkner is an American chemical oceanographer and educator. She is the Director of the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Office of Polar Programs (OPP). Her work in the position led her NSF colleagues to name the Falkner Glacier, in Victoria Land, Antarctica, after her.

Joseph Kerski

Joseph Kerski is a geographer with a focus on the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in education.

References

  1. Wright, Dawn (2007). Arc Marine: GIS for a Blue Planet. ISBN   978-1589480179.
  2. Shields, Barbara. "Esri Appoints Dawn J. Wright as Chief Scientist". Esri News. Esri. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  3. Dolby, Lori. "Curriculum Vitae, Dawn Jeannine Wright". Women Oceanographers.org. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  4. Huber, Colin. "Oregon Professor of the Year". OSU Spotlight. Oregon State University. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  5. Council for Advancement and Support of Education. "U.S. Professors of the Year". Professors of the Year National and State Winners. Council for Advancement and Support of Education. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  6. NOAA Office of National Marine Sanctuaries, Maritime Heritage Program. "Deep Sea Dawn". Voyage to Discovery: Untold Stories of African-Americans and the Sea. NOAA. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  7. Sherman, Lee (2007-07-23). "Great Blue Engine". Terra Magazine. Oregon State University News & Research Communications. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  8. Richardson, Julieanna. "Dawn Wright". The HistoryMakers: The Nation's Largest African American Video Oral History Collection. The HistoryMakers: ScienceMakers. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  9. Lederman, Leon (2001). Portraits of Great American Scientists (1st ed.). Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books. pp. 275–290. ISBN   978-1573929325.
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  12. Norrington, Bill. "Dawn Wright Gives Science & Mathematics Commencement Speech". UCSB Geography News & Events. UCSB Department of Geography. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  13. Wright, Dawn; Bartlett, Darius (2000). Marine and Coastal Geographical Information Systems (1st ed.). London: Taylor & Francis. p. 320. ISBN   978-0-7484-0862-7 . Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  14. Geological Society of America. "2015 Bromery Award for Minorities". Geological Society of America Awards. Geological Society of America. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  15. Warf, Barney (2010). "Wright, Dawn (1961–)". Encyclopedia of Geography. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc. pp. 3137–3138. doi:10.4135/9781412939591.n1263. ISBN   9781412956970.
  16. Hill, Richard (January 30, 2002). "Geo Watch the Undersea World of Dawn Wright" (Wednesday Science Feature). Advance Publications. The Oregonian. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
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