Didymograptus

Last updated

Didymograptus
Temporal range: Middle Ordovician
~478–443  Ma
Didymograptus murchisoni small.jpg
Didymograptus murchisoni, Wales
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Genus:
Didymograptus

McCoy 1851
  • D. artus
  • D. euodus
  • D. gracilis
  • D. murchisoni
  • D. nicholsoni

Didymograptus is an extinct genus of graptolites with four rows of cups. They lived during the Middle Ordovician, [1] to Late Ordovician. [2]

Contents

Distribution

Fossils of Didymograptus have been found in Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Canada (Northwest Territories, Quebec, Yukon, Newfoundland and Labrador), Chile, China, Colombia (Tarqui, Huila), [3] the Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Iran, Morocco, New Zealand, Norway, Peru, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the United States (Alaska, California, Idaho, Nevada, New York, Utah), and Venezuela. [2]

Related Research Articles

North Andes Plate Small tectonic plate in the northern Andes

The North Andes Plate or North Andes Block is a small tectonic plate (microplate) located in the northern Andes. It is squeezed between the faster moving South American Plate and the Nazca Plate to the southwest. Due to the subduction of the Malpelo and Coiba Plates, this area is very prone to volcanic and seismic activity, with many historic earthquakes.

Paja Formation Early Cretaceous geologic formation of central Colombia

The Paja Formation is an Early Cretaceous geologic formation of central Colombia. The formation extends across the northern part of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, the Western Colombian emerald belt and surrounding areas of the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes. In the subsurface, the formation is found in the Middle Magdalena Valley to the west. The Paja Formation stretches across four departments, from north to south the southernmost Bolívar Department, in Santander, Boyacá and the northern part of Cundinamarca. Well known fossiliferous outcrops of the formation occur near Villa de Leyva, also written as Villa de Leiva, and neighboring Sáchica.

Neoptychites is an extinct ammonoid cephalopod genus from the Turonian stage of the Upper Cretaceous, with a worldwide distribution.

<i>Mammites</i> Genus of molluscs (fossil)

Mammites is a Late Cretaceous ammonite genus included in the acanthoceratoidean family, Acanthoceratidae, and the type genus for the subfamily Mammitinae. Mammites was named by Laube and Bruder in 1887.

Hoplitoides is an ammonite from the Upper Cretaceous, Turonian belonging to the Coilopoceratidae, a family in the Acanthoceratoidea. Hoplitoides have early whorls which are grooved, then flat, and finally narrowly rounded venters; early stages with umbilical tubercles and space ribs, later stages becoming smooth. The suture is similar to that of Coilopoceras but less extreme. Hoplitoides has an established distribution which is widespread, from western North America, northwestern Africa and northern South America.

<i>Fagesia</i> Genus of molluscs (fossil)

Fagesia is a small, subglobular ammonite belonging to the vascoceratid family of the Acanthocerataceae that lived during the Turonian stage of the Late Cretaceous, 92-88 Ma ago.

Acodus is an extinct genus of conodonts.

Cordylodus is an extinct genus of conodonts in the family of Cordylodontidae.

La Frontera Formation Geological formation

The La Frontera Formation (Spanish: Formación La Frontera, K2F, Ksf) is a geological formation, part of the Villeta Group, of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense and neighbouring areas of the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes. The sequence of limestones and lydites dates to the Late Cretaceous period; Turonian epoch and has a maximum thickness of 206 metres (676 ft).

Valle Alto Formation

The Valle Alto Formation is a geological formation of the Central Ranges of the Colombian Andes. The formation is composed of shales, sandstones and conglomerates and dates to the Late Jurassic period. Ammonites and fossil flora have been found in the Valle Alto Formation.

Honda Group, Colombia Geological group in the Colombian Andes

The Honda Group is a geological group of the Upper and Middle Magdalena Basins and the adjacent Central and Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes. The group, in older literature also defined as formation, is in its present-day type section in the Tatacoa Desert in the department of Huila subdivided into two main formations; La Victoria and Villavieja.

The Murca Formation is a geological formation of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense, Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes. The predominantly subarkose sandstone with claystones and siltstones formation dates to the Early Cretaceous period; Valanginian epoch and has a maximum thickness of 924 metres (3,031 ft).

Macanal Formation

The Macanal Formation or Macanal Shale is a fossiliferous geological formation of the Altiplano Cundiboyacense and Tenza Valley in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes. The predominantly organic shale formation dates to the Early Cretaceous period; Berriasian to Valanginian epochs and has a maximum thickness of 2,935 metres (9,629 ft). The Macanal Formation contains numerous levels of fossiliferous abundances. Bivalves, ammonites and fossil flora have been found in the formation.

1967 Neiva earthquake

The 1967 Neiva earthquake occurred at 10:24 local time (UTC-05) on February 9 in Colombia. The epicentre of the earthquake was located in San Vicente del Caguán in the department of Caquetá. The earthquake, associated with the Algeciras Fault, part of the megaregional Eastern Frontal Fault System, had a moment magnitude of 7.0 and an intensity of VIII and was felt in northwestern South America from Caracas to Iquitos and Buenaventura to Mitú. 350 aftershocks were registered in the following month. The earthquake produced 98 fatalities and approximately 600,000 USD in damage.

Irlanda Fault

The Irlanda Fault is a dextral strike-slip fault in the department of Cauca in south-central Colombia. A small portion of the fault runs through Huila. The fault has a total length of 54.6 kilometres (33.9 mi) and runs along an average northeast to southwest strike of 023 ± 4 in the Central Ranges of the Colombian Andes. The fault is active and associated with the deadly 1994 Páez River earthquake.

Loma Gorda Formation Geological formation in the Colombian Andes

The Loma Gorda Formation is a fossiliferous geological formation of the Upper Magdalena Valley (VSM) and surrounding Central and Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes, extending from Cundinamarca in the north to Huila and easternmost Tolima in the south. The uppermost unit of the Güagüaquí Group, a sequence of laminated siltstones and shales, dates to the Late Cretaceous period; Turonian to Coniacian epochs, and has a maximum thickness of 167 metres (548 ft).

<i>Bachea</i> Extinct genus of fishes

Bachea is an extinct genus of ray-finned fish that lived during the Late Cretaceous in what is now central Colombia, South America. The type species is B. huilensis, described in 1997 by María Páramo from the Turonian of Huila, Colombia.

Chibcha Terrane

The Chibcha Terrane, named after Chibcha, is the largest of the geological provinces (terranes) of Colombia. The terrane, the oldest explored domains of which date to the Meso- to Neoproterozoic, is situated on the North Andes Plate. The megaregional Romeral Fault System forms the contact of the terrane with the Tahamí Terrane. The contact with the Caribbean and La Guajira Terranes is formed by the regional Bucaramanga-Santa Marta Fault. The northeastern boundary is formed by the regional Oca Fault, bounding the La Guajira Terrane. The terrane is emplaced over the Río Negro-Juruena Province of the Amazonian Craton along the megaregional Eastern Frontal Fault System.

The Venado Formation is a geological formation of the Agua Blanca Group, in the Eastern Ranges of the Colombian Andes, cropping out along the Venado River in northern Huila. The sequence of pyrite containing dark grey micaceous shales interbedded with siltstones and sandstones dates to the Ordovician period; Middle to Late Floian epoch, and has a maximum thickness of 670 metres (2,200 ft) in the type section.

References

  1. Palmer, Douglas; et al. (2009). "Ordovician". Prehistoric Life: the Definitive Visual History of Life on Earth (first American ed.). New York City: DK Publishing. p. 89. ISBN   978-0-7566-5573-0.
  2. 1 2 Didymograptus at Fossilworks.org
  3. Moreno et al., 2008, p.10

Bibliography