Gurvand

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Wrhwant, Gurwant, Gurwent or Gurvand (Latin : Vurfandus) (died 876) was a claimant to the Duchy of Brittany from 874 until his death in opposition to Pascweten, Count of Vannes.

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Wrhwant was complicit in the conspiracy which assassinated Salomon in 874. However, he was of the faction which had been outside Salomon's court and he hailed from northwest Brittany. He was, however, never styled "Count". [1] He mustered 200 men to fight the Vikings in 874. [2] After Salomon's death, he and Pascweten divided the country between them, though Regino of Prüm records that the latter received a larger share. The two soon fell out and fought over the succession. He had died by the middle of 876 and his son Judicael had taken up his role.

His wife was a daughter of Erispoe, and in some reconstructed genealogies their one daughter was married to Berengar of Rennes.

See also

Sources

Notes

  1. Smith, 121.
  2. Smith, 30 and n86.
  3. Bernard Ier De Senlis
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Salomon
Duke of Brittany
disputed with Pasquitan

874–876
Succeeded by
Judicael
and Alan I
Preceded by
-
Count of Rennes
?–876
Succeeded by
Judicael

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