Guy of Thouars

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Guy of Thouars
Died(1213-04-13)13 April 1213
Chemillé
Noble family Thouars
Spouse(s) Constance, Duchess of Brittany Eustachie of Chemillé
FatherGeoffroy IV of Thouars
MotherAénor de Lusignan
Arms of the Viscounts of Thouars Blason famille fr Thouars.svg
Arms of the Viscounts of Thouars

Guy of Thouars (died 13 April 1213) was the third husband of Constance, Duchess of Brittany, whom he married in 1199 in Angers, County of Anjou between August and October 1199 [lower-alpha 1] [1] after her son Arthur of Brittany entered Angers to be recognized as count of the three countships of Anjou, Maine and Touraine. He was an Occitan noble, a member of the House of Thouars.

Contents

Between 1196 and the time of her death delivering twin daughters, Constance ruled Brittany with her young son Arthur I, Duke of Brittany as co-ruler. Duke Arthur I was captured in 1202 by their uncle John, King of England and disappeared in 1203; with his full elder sister Eleanor, Fair Maid of Brittany captured along with him and imprisoned by John, he was succeeded by his infant maternal sister, Alix of Thouars. Guy served as Regent of Brittany for his infant daughter Alix from 1203 to 1206.

In 1204, Guy de Thouars as regent of Duchess Alix, vassal of the Philip II, King of France, undertook the siege of the Normans island fortress of Mont Saint-Michel. Because the abbey would not surrender, he set fire to the village and massacred the population. He was obliged to beat a retreat under the powerful walls of the abbey. The fire which he himself lit extended to the buildings, and the roofs fell prey to the flames. Philip II paid Abbot Jordan for the reconstruction cost.

In 1206 Philip II took the regency of Brittany himself, much to the consternation of the Breton nobles. [lower-alpha 2]

Guy of Thouars died in 1213 in Chemillé in the county of Maine, and was buried with Constance at Villeneuve Abbey, now in the commune of Les Sorinières, outside of Nantes. 'Situated at Nantes south gate, Abbey de Villeneuve' was 'founded in 1201 by Constance de Panthièvre, the Duchess of Brittany ...' [2]

Issue

Guy married Constance of Brittany in 1199. [3] They had two or three [4] daughters:

Guy remarried Eustachie of Chemillé in 1203. They had two sons:

Ancestry

See also

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References

  1. Judith Everard, & Michael Jones. The Charters of Duchess Constance of Brittany and Her Family, 1171-1221, The Boydell Press, 1999, p 135
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 23 February 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)>
  3. Amy Kelly, Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Four Kings, (Harvard University Press, 1978), 351.
  4. Arthur Le Moyne de La Borderie, Histoire de Bretagne, Tome troisième, p. 288
  5. Michael Lower, The Barons' Crusade: A Call to Arms and Its Consequences, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005), 48
  6. Pierre-Hyacinthe Morice, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome premier, p. 129 and 150
  7. Charles Taillandier, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome second, p. IX
  8. Prudence Guillaume de Roujoux, Histoire des rois et des ducs de Bretagne, Tome second, p. 231
  9. Pierre Antoine Noël Bruno, comte Daru, Histoire de Bretagne, Tome premier, p. 407
  10. François Manet, Histoire de la Petite-Bretagne, ou Bretagne Armorique, depuis ses premiers habitans connus, Tome second, p. 308
  11. Pierre-Hyacinthe Morice, Histoire ecclésiastique et civile de Bretagne, Tome premier, p. 129"
  12. Prudence Guillaume de Roujoux, Histoire des rois et des ducs de Bretagne, Tome second, p. 231

Footnotes

  1. The first act mentioning Constance and Guy dates back to October 1199 and on 27 August 1201, Guy "was still in his second regnal year" (Everard & Jones. The Charters of Duchess Constance of Brittany and Her Family, 1171-1221, 1999, p 135.
  2. The young Arthur had already sworn fealty to Philip as king in 1199; Philip now chose this opportunity to exert direct influence in Brittany. In 1213 Philip II of France arranged for Alix of Thouars to marry Peter of Dreux.
  3. According to historians Dom Morice, Dom Charles Taillandiers, Prudence-Guillaume de Roujoux and Arthur Le Moyne de La Borderie, Constance and Guy had a third daughter, called Margaret.
  4. Historians Pierre Daru and François Manet state that Constance and Guy had three daughters, but do not specify their names.