Index of World War II articles (Q)

Last updated
  1. Q. Byrum Hurst
  2. QF 12 pounder 12 cwt naval gun
  3. QF 2 pounder naval gun
  4. QF 3 inch 20 cwt
  5. QF 3.7 inch AA gun
  6. QF 4.5 inch Howitzer
  7. QF 4.5 inch naval gun
  8. Quai André-Citroën
  9. Quai d'Orsay
  10. Quai de la Gare (Paris Métro)
  11. Quai de la Rapée (Paris Métro)
  12. Quai du Louvre
  13. Quarantine Speech
  14. Quartier Pigalle
  15. Quatre-Septembre (Paris Métro)
  16. Quebec Agreement
  17. Quebec Conference, 1943
  18. Queen Elizabeth-class battleship
  19. Quentin C. Aanenson
  20. Quentin George Murray Smythe
  21. Quinn Martin
  22. Quint (Jaws character)
  23. Quintin Brand
  24. Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone
  25. Quisling regime
  26. Quonset hut

Related Research Articles

HMCS Red Deer was a Bangor-class minesweeper that served in the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War. The minesweeper saw action in the Battle of the Atlantic and the Battle of the St. Lawrence. She was named for Red Deer, Alberta. After the war the vessel was briefly reacquired by the Royal Canadian Navy, but was not recommissioned and was sold for scrap and broken up in 1959.

This article explains terms used for the British Armed Forces' ordnance and also ammunition. The terms may have slightly different meanings in the military of other countries.

<i>Highflyer</i>-class cruiser

The Highflyer-class cruisers were a group of three second-class protected cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the late 1890s.

QF 3-inch 20 cwt

The QF 3 inch 20 cwt anti-aircraft gun became the standard anti-aircraft gun used in the home defence of the United Kingdom against German airships and bombers and on the Western Front in World War I. It was also common on British warships in World War I and submarines in World War II. 20 cwt referred to the weight of the barrel and breech, to differentiate it from other "3 inch" guns. While other AA guns also had a bore of 3 inches, the term "3 inch" was only ever used to identify this gun in the World War I era, and hence this is what writers are usually referring to by "3 inch AA gun".

<i>Sentinel</i>-class cruiser ship class

The Sentinel-class cruiser was a pair of scout cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. Both ships participated in World War I and were scrapped shortly after its end.

<i>Pathfinder</i>-class cruiser

The Pathfinder-class cruiser was a pair of scout cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. Both ships participated in World War I; one ship was sunk shortly after the war began, but the other survived the war and was scrapped shortly after its end.

<i>Forward</i>-class cruiser

The Forward-class cruiser was a pair of scout cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. Both ships participated in World War I; the vessels consisted of HMS Forward and HMS Foresight. Both ships survived the war, but were scrapped shortly after its end.

<i>Adventure</i>-class cruiser

The Adventure-class cruiser was a pair of scout cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. They served in the First World War and consisted of the ships HMS Adventure and HMS Attentive.

QF 12-pounder 12 cwt AA gun

The 12 pounder 12 cwt anti-aircraft gun was borrowed for AA use from the QF 12 pounder 12 cwt coast defence gun with the addition of a modified cradle for higher elevation, a retaining catch for the cartridge, and an additional spring recuperator above the barrel and high-angle sights. Writers commonly refer to it simply as "12 pounder anti-aircraft gun". 12 cwt referred to the weight of the barrel and breech to differentiate it from other "12 pounder" guns.

QF 12-pounder 12 cwt naval gun naval artillery

The QF 12-pounder 12-cwt gun was a common, versatile 3-inch (76.2 mm) calibre naval gun introduced in 1894 and used until the middle of the 20th century. It was produced by Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick and used on Royal Navy warships, exported to allied countries, and used for land service. In British service "12-pounder" was the rounded value of the projectile weight, and "12 cwt (hundredweight)" was the weight of the barrel and breech, to differentiate it from other "12-pounder" guns.

12-pounder gun or 12-pdr, usually denotes a gun which fired a projectile of approximately 12 pounds.

QF 12-pounder 18 cwt naval gun

The QF 12 pounder 18 cwt gun was a 3-inch high-velocity naval gun used to equip larger British warships such as battleships for defence against torpedo boats. 18 cwt referred to the weight of gun and breech, to differentiate the gun from others that also fired the "12 pound" shell.

Coastal defences of Australia during World War II

The following is a List of Coastal Batteries in Australia and Territories during World War II. The main threat came early in the war from German raiders and threat of Japanese raids or invasion, and hence all available ordnance was pressed into service, including some obsolete guns and field guns adapted for coast defence.

QF 14-pounder Maxim-Nordenfelt naval gun

The QF 14-pounder was a 3-inch medium-velocity naval gun used to equip warships for defence against torpedo boats. It was produced for export by Maxim-Nordenfelt in competition with the Elswick QF 12-pounder 12 cwt and QF 12-pounder 18 cwt guns.

BL 6-inch Mk II – VI naval gun naval artillery

The BL 6-inch gun Marks II, III, IV and VI were the second and subsequent generations of British 6-inch rifled breechloading naval guns, designed by the Royal Gun Factory in the 1880s following the first 6-inch breechloader, the relatively unsuccessful BL 6-inch 80-pounder gun designed by Elswick Ordnance. They were originally designed to use the old gunpowder propellants but from the mid-1890s onwards were adapted to use the new cordite propellant. They were superseded on new warships by the QF 6-inch gun from 1891.

BL 4-inch Mk I – VI naval gun

The BL 4-inch gun Mk I – Mk VI were a family of early British breech-loading 4-inch naval guns.

<i>Challenger</i>-class cruiser

The Challenger-class cruisers were a pair of second-class protected cruisers built for the Royal Navy in the first decade of the 20th century. One ship, HMS Encounter, was later transferred to the Royal Australian Navy.

HMCS Lachine was a Bangor-class minesweeper of the Royal Canadian Navy that served during the Second World War. Following the war a proposed transfer to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police as Starnes was cancelled, and the ship was instead sold for conversion to a salvage tug in 1945. The ship was broken up in the United Kingdom in 1955.