Quarantine Speech

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The Quarantine Speech was given by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt on October 5, 1937 in Chicago (on the occasion of the dedication of the bridge between north and south outer Lake Shore Drive), calling for an international "quarantine" against the "epidemic of world lawlessness" by aggressive nations as an alternative to the political climate of American neutrality and non-intervention that was prevalent at the time. The speech intensified America's isolationist mood, causing protest by non-interventionists and foes to intervene. No countries were directly mentioned in the speech, although it was interpreted as referring to the Empire of Japan, the Kingdom of Italy, and Nazi Germany. [1] Roosevelt suggested the use of economic pressure, a forceful response, but less direct than outright aggression.

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Public response to the speech was mixed. Famed cartoonist Percy Crosby, creator of Skippy (comic strip) and very outspoken Roosevelt critic, bought a two-page advertisement in the New York Sun to attack it. [2] In addition, it was heavily criticized by Hearst-owned newspapers and Robert R. McCormick of the Chicago Tribune , but several subsequent compendia of editorials showed overall approval in US media. [3]

In Presidential Agent, the fifth novel of the "Lanny Budd" series by Upton Sinclair, Lanny confers with U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt about the conspiracy for a Cagoulard pro-Nazi coup in France; the president has Lanny prepare the first draft of the Quarantine Speech.

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Footnotes

  1. Patrick J. Maney (1998). The Roosevelt presence: the life and legacy of FDR . University of California Press. p.  114. ISBN   978-0-520-21637-2. quarantine speech italy japan.
  2. Percy Crosby on Franklin Roosevelt, David Martin, October 3, 2010
  3. Edward Moore Bennett (1995). Franklin D. Roosevelt and the search for security: American-Soviet relations, 1933-1939. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 98, 99, 100. ISBN   978-0-8420-2247-7.

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