J-Cart

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Micro Machines 2 as a J-Cart Mega drive j-cart.jpg
Micro Machines 2 as a J-Cart

The J-Cart is a special ROM cartridge developed by Codemasters for the Sega Genesis console. It held not only the game data but also came with two additional gamepad ports. This effectively allowed four players to play simultaneously without any adapters or workarounds. The first J-Cart game, Tennis All-Stars, was released in early 1994. [1] [2]

ROM cartridge removable enclosure containing read-only memory devices

A ROM cartridge, usually referred to simply as a cartridge or cart, is a removable memory card containing ROM designed to be connected to a consumer electronics device such as a home computer, video game console and to a lesser extent, electronic musical instruments. ROM cartridges can be used to load software such as video games or other application programs.

Codemasters video game developer and publisher

The Codemasters Software Company Limited, doing business as Codemasters, is a British video game developer and publisher based in Southam, England. Founded by brothers Richard and David Darling in October 1986, Codemasters is one of the oldest British game studios, and in 2005 was named the best independent video game developer by magazine Develop.

Sega Genesis Fourth-generation home video game console and fourth developed by Sega

The Sega Genesis, known as the Mega Drive in regions outside of North America, is a 16-bit home video game console developed and sold by Sega. The Genesis was Sega's third console and the successor to the Master System. Sega released it as the Mega Drive in Japan in 1988, followed by North America as the Genesis in 1989. In 1990, it was distributed as the Mega Drive by Virgin Mastertronic in Europe, Ozisoft in Australasia, and Tec Toy in Brazil. In South Korea, it was distributed by Samsung as the Super Gam*Boy and later the Super Aladdin Boy.

Micro Machines 2: Turbo Tournament also allowed up to eight players to play simultaneously using up to four gamepads, each player using only the D-pad or face buttons.

D-pad Thumb-operated video game control

A D-pad is a flat, usually thumb-operated four-way directional control with one button on each point, found on nearly all modern video game console gamepads, game controllers, on the remote control units of some television and DVD players, and smart phones. Like early video game joysticks, the vast majority of D-pads are digital; in other words, only the directions provided on the D-pad buttons can be used, with no intermediate values. However, combinations of two directions do provide diagonals and many modern D-pads can be used to provide eight-directional input if appropriate.

The J-Cart came relatively late in the life cycle of the console. In addition, Codemasters never licensed the technology to other publishers. Thus the number of games released as J-Carts was limited.

Games

<i>Pete Sampras Tennis</i> 1994 video game

Pete Sampras Tennis was the first game of three of this celebrity-endorsed tennis video game series, released by British software house Codemasters. It was followed by Sampras Tennis 96 still on Sega's 16-bit console and later by Pete Sampras Tennis '97, released for the PlayStation and Windows/DOS.

<i>Super Skidmarks</i> 1995 video game

Super Skidmarks is a racing video game developed by Acid Software and released in 1995. The game is the sequel to Skidmarks and as such was also termed Skidmarks 2 and Super Skidmarks 2 by commentators. The game features “minimally realistic” action viewed from an isometric perspective as well as novelty vehicles such as wheeled cows and caravans. Various methods such as joypad adapters and link systems are employed to allow multiple players to compete, up to a maximum of 8. The game was critically acclaimed and a best-seller in the UK. Several upgrades to the Amiga original were released as well as conversions for the Amiga CD32 and Sega Mega Drive, the latter published by Codemasters.

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Andre Agassi American tennis player

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Handheld game console lightweight, portable electronic device used for gaming

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TurboGrafx-16 video game console

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Gamepad type of game controller held in two hands and where fingers provide input

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NES Four Score

The NES Four Score is a multitap accessory created by Nintendo in 1990 for the Nintendo Entertainment System. Select games can utilize it to enable up to four-player gameplay. The NES Four Score is similar to the previously introduced NES Satellite, a device that allows four players to connect to the NES and extends the range using infrared wireless communication.

Michael Stich German tennis player

Michael Detlef Stich is a former professional tennis player from Germany. He won the men's singles title at Wimbledon in 1991, the men's doubles titles at both Wimbledon and the Olympic Games in 1992, and was a singles runner-up at the 1994 US Open and the 1996 French Open. Stich won 18 singles titles and 10 doubles titles. His career-high singles ranking was World No. 2 in 1993.

A multitap is a video game console peripheral that increases the number of controller ports available to the player, allowing additional controllers to be used in play, similar to a USB hub or a power strip. A multitap often takes the form of a box with three or more controller ports which is then connected to a controller port on the console itself.

The Gamegun is the only light gun released for the 3DO Interactive Multiplayer video game console. It was released in 1994 by American Laser Games, developers of full motion video-based shooter games. The Gamegun is styled exactly like the Peacekeeper Revolver, except with a notable color difference. The peripheral came in two versions: one player and two-player. The only difference between the two is that the two-player version, which was released in 1995, came with an attached y-connector end, allowing two players to plug in two light guns to play simultaneously. With the one player version, the gun could be daisy chained with a regular 3DO controller, allowing another player to use the gamepad at the same time.

<i>Pro Tennis: World Court</i> 1988 video game

Pro Tennis: World Court is a tennis sports arcade game that was released by Namco in 1988 only in Japan; it runs upon Namco System 1 hardware, and was inspired by the 1987 Famicom game Family Tennis. In August 1988, the game was ported to the PC Engine console, in which a new tennis-based role-playing quest mode was added, and was later ported to the North American TurboGrafx-16 console by NEC under the title of World Court Tennis in 1989 - and a sequel named Super World Court was released in 1992, which ran on Namco NA-1 hardware and allowed up to four players to play simultaneously.

<i>Sampras Tennis 96</i> video game

Sampras Tennis 96 is a 1995 tennis video game developed by Codemasters. It is the sequel to Pete Sampras Tennis. Like its predecessor, it was one of the few titles released on the J-Cart format, which provided two additional controller ports for multiplayer games. The game was followed by Pete Sampras Tennis '97, which was released for the PlayStation and personal computers.

Micro Machines is a series of video games featuring toy cars, developed by Codemasters and published on several platforms. The series is based on the Micro Machines toy line of miniature vehicles.

Barry Cowan is a British former tennis player, best known for taking Pete Sampras to five sets at Wimbledon in 2001.

<i>Micro Machines 2: Turbo Tournament</i> 1994 video game

Micro Machines 2: Turbo Tournament is a 1994 racing video game developed by Supersonic Software and published by Codemasters for the Sega Mega Drive. The sequel to Micro Machines, the game is themed around Galoob's Micro Machines toys, and players race around environments in miniature toy vehicles. Micro Machines 2: Turbo Tournament adds new vehicles and game modes, and the Mega Drive version was released on J-Cart, enabling up to eight players without a multitap.

Pete Sampras Tennis '97 is a tennis video game developed and published by Codemasters. It was released for Microsoft Windows and MS-DOS. It was also released for the PlayStation as Sampras Extreme Tennis. It was endorsed by multiple Grand Slam champion Pete Sampras who appears in the game as an unlockable character. It is the final game in the Pete Sampras Tennis series.

<i>Micro Machines</i> (video game) first game in the Micro Machines series (published 1991)

Micro Machines is a racing video game developed by Codemasters and originally published by Camerica for the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) in 1991. Themed around Galoob's Micro Machines toys, players race in miniaturised toy vehicles around various environments. The game is the first instalment in the Micro Machines video game series.

References

  1. "Quadro-Power". Megablast (in German). Joker Verlag. 1994-03-30. p. 29.
  2. "Four-Player Fun". GamePro (59). IDG. June 1994. p. 184.