List of 32X games

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A Sega 32X attached to a Sega Genesis Sega-Genesis-Model2-32X.jpg
A Sega 32X attached to a Sega Genesis

The 32X is an add-on for the Sega Genesis video game console. Codenamed "Project Mars", [1] the 32X was designed to expand the power of the Genesis and serve as a holdover until the release of the Sega Saturn. [2] Independent of the Genesis, the 32X used its own ROM cartridges and had its own library of games. A total of 40 titles were produced worldwide [36 NA games (10 Exclusives), 27 PAL (2 Exclusives), 18 JP (1 exclusive), and 1 gameexclusive to BR], including six that required both the 32X and Sega CD add-ons. [3]

32X Add-on for the Sega Mega Drive/Genesis video game console

The 32X is an add-on for the Sega Genesis video game console. Codenamed "Project Mars", the 32X was designed to expand the power of the Genesis and serve as a transitional console into the 32-bit era until the release of the Sega Saturn. Independent of the Genesis, the 32X uses its own ROM cartridges and has its own library of games. The add-on was distributed under the name Super 32X in Japan, Genesis 32X in North America, Mega Drive 32X in the PAL region, and Mega 32X in Brazil.

Sega Genesis Fourth-generation home video game console and fourth developed by Sega

The Sega Genesis, known as the Mega Drive in regions outside of North America, is a 16-bit home video game console developed and sold by Sega. The Genesis is Sega's third console and the successor to the Master System. Sega released it as the Mega Drive in Japan in 1988, followed by North America as the Genesis in 1989. In 1990, it was distributed as the Mega Drive by Virgin Mastertronic in Europe, Ozisoft in Australasia, and Tectoy in Brazil. In South Korea, it was distributed by Samsung as the Super Gam*Boy and later the Super Aladdin Boy.

A video game console is a computer device that outputs a video signal or visual image to display a video game that one or more people can play.

Contents

Unveiled at June 1994's Consumer Electronics Show, Sega presented the 32X as the "poor man's entry into 'next generation' games." [1] The product was originally conceived as an entirely new console by Sega of Japan and positioned as an inexpensive alternative for gamers into the 32-bit era, but at the suggestion of Sega of America research and development head Joe Miller, the console was converted into an add-on to the existing Genesis and made more powerful, with two 32-bit central processing unit chips and a 3D graphics processor. [1] Despite these changes, the console failed to attract either developers or consumers as the Sega Saturn had already been announced for release the next year. [1] In part because of this, and also to rush the 32X to market before the holiday season in 1994, the 32X suffered from a poor library of titles, including Genesis ports with improvements to the number of colors that appeared on screen. [2] Originally released at US$159, Sega dropped the price to $99 in only a few months and ultimately cleared the remaining inventory at $19.95. [1] At least 665,000 units were sold. [4]

Consumer Electronics Show electronics and technology trade show

CES is an annual trade show organized by the Consumer Technology Association (CTA). Held in January at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, the event typically hosts presentations of new products and technologies in the consumer electronics industry.

Research and development general term for activities in connection with corporate or governmental innovation

Research and development, known in Europe as research and technological development (RTD), refers to innovative activities undertaken by corporations or governments in developing new services or products, or improving existing services or products. Research and development constitutes the first stage of development of a potential new service or the production process.

Central processing unit Electronic circuitry within a computer that carries out the instructions of a computer program by performing the basic arithmetic, logical, control and input/output (I/O) operations specified by the instructions

A central processing unit (CPU), also called a central processor or main processor, is the electronic circuitry within a computer that carries out the instructions of a computer program by performing the basic arithmetic, logic, controlling, and input/output (I/O) operations specified by the instructions. The computer industry has used the term "central processing unit" at least since the early 1960s. Traditionally, the term "CPU" refers to a processor, more specifically to its processing unit and control unit (CU), distinguishing these core elements of a computer from external components such as main memory and I/O circuitry.

The following list contains all of the games released for the 32X, as well as the games that required both the 32X and the CD. Among the titles for the 32X were ports of arcade games Space Harrier and Star Wars Arcade , a sidescroller with a hummingbird as a main character in Kolibri , a 32X-exclusive game in the Sonic the Hedgehog series in Knuckles' Chaotix , and a version of Doom that was noted for its movement and game length issues when compared to other versions of the game. In a retrospective review of the console, Star Wars Arcade was considered the best game for the 32X by IGN for its co-operative play, soundtrack, and faithful reproduction of the experiences of Star Wars . [2] [5]

Arcade game Coin-operated entertainment machine

An arcade game or coin-op game is a coin-operated entertainment machine typically installed in public businesses such as restaurants, bars and amusement arcades. Most arcade games are video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games or merchandisers. While exact dates are debated, the golden age of arcade video games is usually defined as a period beginning sometime in the late 1970s and ending sometime in the mid-1980s. Excluding a brief resurgence in the early 1990s, the arcade industry subsequently declined in the Western hemisphere as competing home video game consoles such as the Sony PlayStation and Microsoft Xbox increased in their graphics and game-play capability and decreased in cost. The eastern hemisphere retains a strong arcade industry.

<i>Space Harrier</i> 1986 video game

Space Harrier is a third-person rail shooter developed by Sega Enterprises and released in December 1985. Originally conceived as a realistic military-themed game played in the third-person perspective and featuring a player-controlled fighter jet, technical and memory restrictions resulted in Sega developer Yu Suzuki redesigning it around a jet-propelled human character in a fantasy setting. With an analog flight stick and a cockpit-style cabinet that tilted and rolled during play, it was advertised by Sega as a taikan arcade game.

<i>Star Wars Arcade</i> 1993 video game

Star Wars Arcade is a video game developed by Sega and released in 1993 in Japan and USA and 1994 in Europe to arcades. A home port served as a launch title for the Sega 32X in 1994. It is set during the original Star Wars trilogy.

Region code guide
Regions releasedRegion description
JP (Japan)Japanese (NTSC-J) formatted release
NA (North America)North America and other NTSC territories, besides Japan
PAL PAL/SECAM territories: much of Europe, Australia, parts of Asia
BR (Brazil)NTSC-U release in Brazil (some systems may output PAL-M, but all games are NTSC-U)

Games

Title(s)
[3] [6]
Year released
[3] [6]
Requires Sega CD?
[3]
Developer
Publisher
JPNAPALBRRef(s)
After Burner 1995 No Sega SegaYesYesYes [7] [8]
BC Racers 1995 No Core Design U.S. Gold Yes [9]
Blackthorne 1995 No Interplay Interplay
Tectoy (Brazil)
YesYes [10] [11]
Brutal: Above the Claw 1995 No GameTek GameTekYes [12]
Corpse Killer 1994 Yes Digital Pictures Digital PicturesYesYes [13]
Cosmic Carnage (JP: Cyber Brawl) 1994 No Givro Sega YesYesYes [14]
Darxide 1995 No Frontier Developments Sega Yes [15]
Doom 1994 No id Software Sega YesYesYes [16]
Fahrenheit 1995 Yes Sega Studios Sega
Tectoy (Brazil)
Yes [17] [18]
FIFA Soccer 96 1995 NoExtended Play Productions EA Sports Yes [19]
Golf Magazine: 36 Great Holes Starring Fred Couples 1994 NoFlashpoint Productions Sega YesYesYes [20]
Knuckles' Chaotix 1995 No Sonic Team Sega YesYesYes [21]
Kolibri 1995 No Novotrade Sega YesYes [22] [23]
Metal Head 1995 No Sega SegaYesYesYes [24]
Mortal Kombat II 1995 No Probe Acclaim Entertainment YesYesYes [25]
Motocross Championship 1995 No Artech Studios Sega YesYes [26]
NBA Jam Tournament Edition 1995 No Iguana Entertainment Acclaim Entertainment YesYesYes [27]
NFL Quarterback Club 1995 NoIGS Games Acclaim Entertainment YesYesYes [28]
Night Trap 1994 Yes Digital Pictures Sega YesYes [29]
Pitfall: The Mayan Adventure 1995 No Activision ActivisionYes [30]
Primal Rage 1995 No Probe Time Warner Interactive YesYes [31]
R.B.I. Baseball '95 1995 No Tengen TengenYes [32]
Sangokushi IV 1995 No Koei KoeiYes [33]
Shadow Squadron (JP and PAL: Stellar Assault) 1995 No Sega SegaYesYes [34]
Slam City with Scottie Pippen 1995 Yes Digital Pictures Sega YesYes [35]
Space Harrier 1994 No Sega-AM2 Sega YesYesYes [36]
Spider-Man: Web of Fire 1996 No BlueSky Software Sega Yes [37]
Star Trek: Starfleet Academy Starship Bridge Simulator 1995 No Interplay InterplayYes [38]
Star Wars Arcade 1994 NoSega Interactive Sega YesYesYes [5]
Supreme Warrior 1995 Yes Digital Pictures Sega YesYes [39]
Surgical Strike 1995 YesThe Code Monkeys Tec Toy Yes [40]
T-MEK 1995 No Bits Studios Time Warner Interactive YesYes [41]
Tempo 1995 No Sega
Red Company
Sega YesYes [42]
Toughman Contest 1995 No Visual Concepts Electronic Arts YesYes [43]
Virtua Fighter 1995 No Sega-AM2 Sega YesYesYes [44]
Virtua Racing Deluxe 1994 No Sega-AM2 Sega YesYesYes [45]
World Series Baseball Starring Deion Sanders 1995 No Blue Sky Software Sega Yes [46] [47]
WWF Raw 1995 No Sculptured Software Acclaim Entertainment YesYesYes [48]
WWF WrestleMania: The Arcade Game 1995 No Sculptured Software Acclaim Entertainment Yes [49]
Zaxxon's Motherbase 2000 (EU: Motherbase/ JP: Parasquad) 1995 No CSK Research Institute Corp. Sega YesYesYes [50]

Cancelled games

TitleReference
32 Xtreme [51]
NBA Action [52]
Primetime NFL Football [53]
Ratchet and Bolt [54]
Saban's VR Troopers [55]
SegaSonic the Hedgehog [56] [57]
Virtua Hamster [58]
X-Men: Mind Games [59]

See also

This is a list of all video game lists on Wikipedia, sorted by varying classifications.

Related Research Articles

Sega CD Add-on for the Sega Genesis video game console

The Sega CD, released as the Mega-CD in most regions outside North America and Brazil, is a CD-ROM accessory for the Sega Genesis video game console designed and produced by Sega as part of the fourth generation of video game consoles. It was released on December 12, 1991 in Japan, October 15, 1992 in North America, and April 2, 1993 in Europe. The Sega CD lets the user play CD-based games and adds hardware functionality such as a faster central processing unit and graphic enhancements. It can also play audio CDs and CD+G discs.

Sega Saturn Video game console

The Sega Saturn is a 32-bit fifth-generation home video game console developed by Sega and released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America, and July 8, 1995 in Europe. The successor to the successful Sega Genesis, the Saturn has a dual-CPU architecture and eight processors. Its games are in CD-ROM format, and its game library contains several arcade ports as well as original games.

Genesis Nomad handheld game console

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In the history of computer and video games, the fourth generation of game consoles began on October 30, 1987 with the Japanese release of NEC Home Electronics' PC Engine. Although NEC released the first console of this era, sales were mostly dominated by the rivalry between Nintendo's and Sega's consoles in North America: the Super Nintendo Entertainment System and the Sega Genesis. Handheld systems released during this time include the Nintendo Game Boy, released in 1989, and the Sega Game Gear, first released in 1990.

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<i>F-Zero GX</i> 2003 video game

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<i>Revolution X</i> 1994 video game

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<i>Road Blaster</i> 1985 video game

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History of Sega

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