James Cycle Co

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James Superswift with Villiers 247 cc twin-cylinder engine James Superswift Sports 250 - Flickr - mick - Lumix.jpg
James Superswift with Villiers 247 cc twin-cylinder engine

The James Cycle Co Ltd., Greet, Birmingham, England, was one of many British cycle and motorcycle makers based in the English Midlands, particularly Birmingham. Most of their light motorcycles, often with the characteristic maroon finish, used Villiers and, later, AMC two-stroke engines.

Contents

James were prolific bicycle and motorcycle manufacturers from 1897 to 1966. The company was taken over by Associated Motor Cycles in 1951 and combined with Francis-Barnett in 1957. In 1966 the company became one of the many British motorcycle companies forced out of business by Japanese competition.

James Captain 197 cc Flickr - ronsaunders47 - JAMES CAPTAIN. 197cc SINGLE TWO STROKE..jpg
James Captain 197 cc

Models

James produced the 98 cc Autocycle, 125 cc Comet, Commodore, also 1954/55 Colonel 225cc Villiers single cylinder, several Captains as well as trials and scrambles bikes. In 1956 they produced the Captain 200 K7, Cotswold 200 K7C, and Commando 200 K7T, all 197 cc.

See also

List of James motorcycles

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