John Parrott

Last updated

John Parrott
MBE
John Parrott2.jpg
Parrott in October 2008
Born (1964-05-11) 11 May 1964 (age 57)
Liverpool, England
Sport countryFlag of England.svg  England
Nickname
  • The Entertainer
  • Mr. JP
  • The Carrot
Professional1983–2010
Highest ranking 2 (1989–90, 1992–931993–94)
Career winnings£3,160,747
Highest break 147 : 1992 Matchroom League
Century breaks 221
Tournament wins
Ranking 9
Non-ranking7
World Champion 1991

John Stephen Parrott, MBE (born 11 May 1964) is an English former professional snooker player and television personality. He was a familiar face on the professional snooker circuit during the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, and remained within the top 16 of the world rankings for fourteen consecutive seasons.

Contents

He reached the final of the 1989 World Championship, where he lost 3–18 to Steve Davis, the heaviest defeat in a world championship final in modern times. He won the title two years later, defeating Jimmy White in the final of the 1991 World Championship. He repeated his win against White later the same year, to take the 1991 UK Championship title, becoming only the third player to win both championships in the same calendar year (after Steve Davis and Stephen Hendry); he is still one of only six players to have achieved this feat. He spent three seasons at number 2 in the world rankings (1989–90, 1992–93, 1993–94), and he is one of several players to have achieved more than 200 competitive centuries during his career, with 221.

Early career

Parrott was a keen bowls player until the age of twelve, [1] but then discovered snooker, and has been a dedicated player ever since. He was successful from an early age; when he was fifteen, his talent was spotted by Phil Miller, who became his long-term manager in 1980. He lost in the final of the English Under-16s Championship in 1980, but won the 1981 Pontins Junior Championship. In 1982, he was Pontins Open Champion and Junior Pot Black Champion, after narrowly defeating Mark "Lightning" Lockwood. He turned professional the following year after winning a record fourteen tournaments in his last year as an amateur player. [2]

Professional career

Parrott turned professional in 1983 and he made his televised debut as a professional during the 1984 Classic in which he played Alex Higgins in the last 16 of the competition in front of a packed house at Warrington near his hometown of Liverpool. He then caused a stir when he won the match 5–2. He then beat Tony Knowles in the next round before losing to Steve Davis in the semi-finals. By then, bookmakers had him tipped to be the World Snooker Champion within five years (it took him seven years). He took his first ranking title in the 1989 European Open, and defended his title in 1990.

Parrott spent 14 consecutive seasons in the top 16 of the snooker world rankings, eleven of them in the top 6. [1]

From 1984 to 2004 Parrott was ever-present at the World Championship, reaching at least the last 16 every year from 1984 to 1995, [1] but he failed to qualify in 2005. [3]

Following his 1991 victory he never again reached the semi-finals, but lost in the quarter-finals seven times between 1992 and 1999.

Overall, Parrott won a total of nine world ranking events, which as of November 2019 was twelfth on the all-time list behind Stephen Hendry, Steve Davis, Ronnie O'Sullivan, John Higgins, Mark Williams, Jimmy White, Mark Selby, Ding Junhui, Neil Robertson, Peter Ebdon and Judd Trump. Winning both the World Championship and UK Championship in 1991 made him one of only six players to have won snooker's two most prominent ranking titles in the same year.

Parrott also reached the final of the Masters three times in four years, but lost to Stephen Hendry on each occasion.

Parrott came through the qualifying event for the World Championship a record 10 times. In 2007 he reached the last 16 of the World Championship for the first time in seven years, after victories over James Leadbetter, David Gray and Steve Davis (10–9, having led 6–1 and 9–6). [4]

A record ten of Parrott's World Championship matches went to a final-frame decider, seven of which he won. He was also the first player to conduct a "whitewash" in the Crucible World Championship final stages, when he defeated Eddie Charlton 10–0 in the first round of the 1992 tournament. [5] For 27 years, he held the record for being the only player ever to achieve this, until Shaun Murphy defeated China's Luo Honghao 10–0 in the first round of the 2019 World Championship.

On 4 August 2009 at the qualifiers for the 2009 Shanghai Masters he lost 0–5 against Michael White.

Following his 6–10 defeat to young Chinese Zhang Anda in the 2010 World Championship Qualifiers, Parrott finished outside the top 64 in the end of season rankings and was not assured a place on the main tour for the 2010–11 season. [6] Later Parrott announced he was to retire from the professional game. [7] }}

Parrott did however participate in the preliminary qualifying rounds of the 2012 World Snooker Championship, losing 0–5 to Patrick Wallace in Round 1.

Television work

Parrott is a studio expert on snooker for BBC Sport, often in partnership with Steve Davis; he also delivers many of their playing tutorials and provides guidance for the viewers. From 1996 to 2002, he was one of the team captains on A Question of Sport , alongside footballer and pundit Ally McCoist.

He is also an avid follower of horse racing and has been involved in the BBC's horse racing coverage as part of the presenting team. [8]

Personal life

Parrott is an Everton supporter. He is the brother-in-law of former Everton player Duncan Ferguson. [9]

In 1996, Parrott was honoured with an MBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours list, for charitable services in Merseyside. [10]

In 2008, he launched John Parrott Cue Sports, an online retailer selling snooker and pool cues and some snooker collectables. [11] This was re-branded John Parrott Sports in 2019. [12]

In 2010, it was announced that Parrott was to be the Honorary Patron of the British Crown Green Bowling Association (BCGBA). [13]

Performance and rankings timeline

Tournament 1983/
84
1984/
85
1985/
86
1986/
87
1987/
88
1988/
89
1989/
90
1990/
91
1991/
92
1992/
93
1993/
94
1994/
95
1995/
96
1996/
97
1997/
98
1998/
99
1999/
00
2000/
01
2001/
02
2002/
03
2003/
04
2004/
05
2005/
06
2006/
07
2007/
08
2008/
09
2009/
10
Ranking [14] [nb 1] [nb 2] 20 18 17 13 7 2 3 4 2 2 5 4 4 6 6 5 10 22 18 30 31 29 42 39 39 53
Ranking tournaments
Shanghai Masters Tournament Not HeldLQALQ
Grand Prix [nb 3] 2R 2R 1R 2R SF 2R 3R QF 1R 2R SF 1R 1R SF QF 2R 2R 2R 2R 1R SF 1R 1R LQLQ 2R LQ
UK Championship NR 1R 2R SF QF QF 3R SF W F SF QF 3R QF 2R QF 2R 2R 2R 1R 1R QF 1R 1R LQWDLQ
Welsh Open Tournament Not Held SF QF 2R 1R F SF QF 2R 1R 1R LQLQ 2R 3R 1R 1R 1R LQLQ
China Open [nb 4] Tournament Not HeldNR QF 1R 2R 1R Not HeldLQLQLQLQWDLQ
World Championship 2R QF 2R 2R 2R F SF W QF QF QF QF 1R QF QF QF 2R 1R 1R 1R 1R LQ 1R 2R LQLQLQ
Non-ranking tournaments
Premier League [nb 5] ANot HeldAA F RR A RR SF F RR RR RR AAAAAAAAAAAAA
The Masters AAAA SF F F QF F QF 1R 1R QF QF 1R 1R SF QF AAAALQAAAA
Former ranking tournaments
Canadian Masters Not HeldNon-Ranking QF Tournament Not Held
Hong Kong Open [nb 6] Non-Ranking EventNH 2R Not HeldNRTournament Not Held
Classic SF LQ 1R QF F QF 3R 2R QF Tournament Not Held
Strachan Open Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held
Dubai Classic [nb 7] Tournament Not HeldNR SF 2R W W 2R 1R W 1R Tournament Not Held
German Masters [nb 8] Tournament Not Held 2R 1R F NRTournament Not Held
Malta Grand Prix Tournament Not HeldNon-Ranking Event QF NRTournament Not Held
Thailand Masters [nb 9] Non-Ranking EventNot HeldWD QF 3R QF 2R 2R QF QF F SF 1R SF 1R NRNot HeldNRNot Held
Scottish Open [nb 10] ALQ QF 1R 3R 1R QF Not Held 2R W SF 1R QF 2R 3R 1R 3R 2R 1R 3R Tournament Not Held
British Open [nb 11] NR 2R 3R 1R SF SF 1R 1R 1R 3R 3R SF QF 1R QF QF 2R 2R 2R 3R 1R 2R Tournament Not Held
Irish Masters Non-Ranking EventLQLQLQNHNRNot Held
European Open [nb 12] Tournament Not Held W W 1R SF 2R SF F W F NR SF Not HeldLQLQLQLQ 1R LQNRNot Held
Northern Ireland Trophy Tournament Not HeldNRLQ 1R LQNH
Bahrain Championship Tournament Not HeldLQNH
Former non-ranking tournaments
UK Championship 1R Tournament Not Held
Canadian Masters Not Held QF AARTournament Not Held
Hong Kong Open [nb 13] AA SF A QF NHRNot HeldAATournament Not Held
Fosters Professional [nb 14] NHA SF AA SF Tournament Not Held
Pontins Professional A QF QF SF W QF AAAAAAAAAAATournament Not Held
English Professional Championship NH 2R 2R QF 2R F Tournament Not Held
New Zealand Masters NHANot HeldA QF Tournament Not Held
Norwich Union Grand Prix Tournament Not HeldA SF W Tournament Not Held
World Masters Tournament Not Held 2R Tournament Not Held
London Masters Tournament Not Held F F SF Tournament Not Held
Thailand Masters A RR AANot Held SF Ranking EventANot HeldANot Held
European Challenge Tournament Not Held QF AATournament Not Held
Hong Kong Challenge [nb 15] A QF AAA QF NHA QF Tournament Not Held
Indian Challenge Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held
Belgian Challenge Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held
Kent Classic [nb 16] Not HeldA W NHAANH W Tournament Not Held
Belgian Masters Tournament Not Held W SF F Not HeldATournament Not Held
World Matchplay Tournament Not Held F F QF QF QF Tournament Not Held
Nescafe Extra Challenge Tournament Not Held RR Tournament Not Held
Pot Black A 1R 1R Tournament Not Held QF QF 1R Tournament Not HeldAAANot Held
Malta Grand Prix Tournament Not Held W AAAARATournament Not Held
Tenball Tournament Not Held QF Tournament Not Held
Red & White Challenge Tournament Not Held F Tournament Not Held
German Masters [nb 17] Tournament Not HeldNon-Ranking Event W Tournament Not Held
Champions Cup [nb 18] Tournament Not Held QF QF QF QF 1R RR AATournament Not Held
Scottish Masters AAA QF ANH SF QF QF QF QF 1R 1R SF SF QF QF AAATournament Not Held
Irish Masters AAAAA SF QF F SF SF QF SF 1R QF SF 1R SF AARanking EventATournament Not Held
Performance Table Legend
LQlost in the qualifying draw#Rlost in the early rounds of the tournament
(WR = Wildcard round, RR = Round robin)
QFlost in the quarter-finals
SFlost in the semi-finalsFlost in the finalWwon the tournament
DNQdid not qualify for the tournamentAdid not participate in the tournamentWDwithdrew from the tournament
NH / Not Heldmeans an event was not held.
NR / Non-Ranking Eventmeans an event is/was no longer a ranking event.
R / Ranking Eventmeans an event is/was a ranking event.
RV / Ranking & Variant Format Eventmeans an event is/was a ranking & variant format event.
MR / Minor-Ranking Eventmeans an event is/was a minor-ranking event.
PA / Pro-am Eventmeans an event is/was a pro-am event.
VF / Variant Format Eventmeans an event is/was a variant format event.
  1. From the 2010/2011 season it shows the ranking at the beginning of the season.
  2. New players on the Main Tour do not have a ranking.
  3. The event run under different names as Professional Players Tournament (1983/1984) and the LG Cup (2001/2002–2003/2004)
  4. The event run under different name as China International (1997/1998–1998/1999)
  5. The event was also called the Professional Snooker League (1983/1984), Matchroom League (1986/1987-1991/1992) and European League (1992/1993-1996/1997
  6. The event also ran as the Australian Masters (1983/1984–1987/1988 & 1995/1996)
  7. The event ran under different names such as Thailand Classic (1995/1996) and Asian Classic (1996/1997)
  8. The event run under different name as German Open (1995/1996–1997/1998)
  9. The event ran under different names such as Asian Open (1989/1990 to 1992/1993) and Thailand Open (1993/1994 to 1996/1997).
  10. The event ran under different names such as International Open (1983/1984 to 1984/1985, 1986/1987 to 1996/1997), Goya Matchroom Trophy (1985/1986) and Players Championship (2003/2004).
  11. The event was also known as the International Masters (1983/1984).
  12. The event ran under different names such as the Irish Open (1998/1999) and Malta Cup (2004/2005–2007/2008)
  13. The event also ran as the Australian Masters (1983/1984–1987/1988 & 1995/1996)
  14. The event also ran as the Carlsberg Challenge (1984/1985–1986/1987) and the Carling Challenge (1987/1988)
  15. The event was also called the Hong Kong Masters (1983/1984–1988/1989)
  16. The event was also called the Kent Cup (1986/1987–1987/1988 & 1989/1990–1990/1991)
  17. The event run under different name as German Open (1995/1996–1997/1998)
  18. The event ran under a different name as the Charity Challenge (1994/1995–1998/1999)

Career finals

Ranking finals: 18 (9 titles, 9 runners-up)

Legend
World Championship (1–1)
UK Championship (1–1)
Other (7–7)
OutcomeNo.YearChampionshipOpponent in the finalScore
Runner-up1. 1988 The Classic Flag of England.svg Steve Davis 11–13
Winner1. 1989 European Open Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Terry Griffiths 9–8
Runner-up2. 1989 World Snooker Championship Flag of England.svg Steve Davis 3–18
Winner2. 1990 European Open (2) Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 10–6
Winner3. 1991 World Snooker Championship Flag of England.svg Jimmy White 18–11
Winner4. 1991 Dubai Classic Flag of England.svg Tony Knowles 9–3
Winner5. 1991 UK Championship Flag of England.svg Jimmy White 16–13
Runner-up3. 1992 Strachan Open Flag of Thailand.svg James Wattana 5–9
Winner6. 1992 Dubai Classic (2) Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 9–8
Runner-up4. 1992 UK Championship Flag of England.svg Jimmy White 9–16
Winner7. 1994 International Open Flag of Thailand.svg James Wattana 9–5
Runner-up5. 1994 European Open Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 3–9
Winner8. 1995 Thailand Classic (3) Flag of England.svg Nigel Bond 9–6
Runner-up6. 1996 Welsh Open Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Mark Williams 3–9
Winner9. 1996 European Open (3) Flag of England.svg Peter Ebdon 9–7
Runner-up7. 1997 European Open (2) Flag of Scotland.svg John Higgins 5–9
Runner-up8. 1997 German Open Flag of Scotland.svg John Higgins 4–9
Runner-up9. 1998 Thailand Masters Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 6–9

Non-ranking finals: 22 (7 titles, 15 runners-up)

Legend
The Masters (0–3)
Premier League (0–2)
Other (7–10)
OutcomeNo.YearChampionshipOpponent in the finalScore
Winner1. 1988 Kent Cup Flag of England.svg Martin Clark 5–1
Winner2. 1988 Pontins Professional Flag of England.svg Mike Hallett 9–1
Runner-up1. 1988 World Matchplay Flag of England.svg Steve Davis 5–9
Runner-up2. 1989 Matchroom League Flag of England.svg Steve Davis Round-Robin
Runner-up3. 1989 The Masters Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 6–9
Runner-up4. 1989 English Professional Championship Flag of England.svg Mike Hallett 7–9
Runner-up5. 1989 London Masters Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 2–4
Runner-up6. 1989 World Matchplay (2) Flag of England.svg Jimmy White 9–18
Runner-up7. 1990 The Masters (2) Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 4–9
Runner-up8. 1990 London Masters (2) Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 2–4
Winner3. 1990 Norwich Union Grand Prix Flag of England.svg Steve Davis 4–2
Winner4. 1990 Belgian Masters Flag of England.svg Jimmy White 9–6
Runner-up9. 1991 Irish Masters Flag of England.svg Steve Davis 5–9
Runner-up10. 1991 Indian Challenge Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 5–9
Runner-up11. 1992 The Masters (3) Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 4–9
Winner5. 1992 Kent Classic Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 6–5
Runner-up12. 1992 Belgian Masters Flag of Thailand.svg James Wattana 5–10
Runner-up13. 1994 European League (2) Flag of Scotland.svg Stephen Hendry 7–10
Winner6. 1994 Malta Grand Prix Flag of Malta.svg Tony Drago 7–6
Runner-up14. 1995 Red & White Challenge Flag of England.svg Nigel Bond 6–8
Winner7. 1998 German Masters Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Mark Williams 6–4
Runner-up15. 2017 World Seniors Championship Flag of England.svg Peter Lines 0–4

Team finals: 1 (1 title)

OutcomeNo.YearChampionshipTeamOpponent(s) in the finalScore
Winner1.2000 Nations Cup Flag of England.svg  England Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 6–4

Pro-am finals: 3 (2 titles, 1 runner-up)

OutcomeNo.YearChampionshipOpponent in the finalScore
Winner1.1982 Pontins Spring Open Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg Ray Reardon 7–4 [15]
Runner-up1.1985 Pontins Spring Open Flag of England.svg Jim Chambers6–7 [15]
Winner2.1986 Pontins Spring Open (2) Flag of England.svg Tony Putnam7–6 [15]

Amateur finals: 3 (2 titles, 1 runner-up)

OutcomeNo.YearChampionshipOpponent in the finalScore
Winner1.1982 Junior Pot Black Flag of England.svg John Keers169–70 [n 1]
Runner-up1.1983 English Amateur Championship Flag of England.svg Tony Jones 9–13
Winner2.1983 Junior Pot Black (2) Flag of England.svg Steve Ventham1–1 [n 2]

Notes

  1. Final decided on aggregate score over two frames
  2. Match decided on pink ball game

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Player Profile: John Parrott". Global Snooker. Archived from the original on 23 December 2002.
  2. John Parrott MBE Archived 26 May 2012 at archive.today
  3. "Ding Denied". Eurosport. 15 March 2006. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  4. "Parrott edges out colleague Davis". BBC Sport . 22 April 2007.
  5. Hendon, David (9 November 2004). "Obituary: Eddie Charlton". The Independent. Retrieved 29 November 2019.
  6. Everton, Clive (4 March 2010). "Jimmy White out of snooker world championship after Ken Doherty defeat". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 February 2011.
  7. "Parrott could call it a day". Sky Sports. 4 March 2010. Retrieved 13 April 2019.
  8. BBC Press Office (29 March 2010). "2010 Grand National in HD – a first for UK horse racing".
  9. "Why I love... Everton". BBC Sport . 13 March 2001. Retrieved 24 April 2010.
  10. "Supplement to the London Gazette, 15th June 1996 – Birthday honours 1996". The London Gazette (54427). 14 June 1996. p. B22.
  11. "John Parrott Cue Sports". johnparrottcuesports.com. Archived from the original on 10 August 2011. Retrieved 19 October 2008.
  12. "John Parrott Sports". johnparrottsports.com. Retrieved 19 August 2019.
  13. "Press Release – BCGBA welcome John Parrott MBE as honorary patron". BCGBA. Archived from the original on 9 August 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2010.
  14. "Ranking History". Snooker.org. Retrieved 7 November 2017.
  15. 1 2 3 "Brief History of the Pontins Open and Professional". SnookerArchive.co.uk. 2008. Archived from the original on 28 February 2012.

Further reading