Lancashire Thunder

Last updated
Lancashire Thunder
Lancashire Thunder logo.png
Personnel
Captain Kate Cross
CoachMark McInnes (2019)
Alex Blackwell (2018)
Stephen Titchard (2016–2017)
Team information
Colours  Red
Founded2016
Home ground Old Trafford, Manchester
Secondary home ground(s) Aigburth, Liverpool
Stanley Park, Blackpool
Chester Boughton Hall CC, Chester
History
WCSL  wins0
Official website Lancashire Cricket
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T20 kit

Lancashire Thunder were an English women's Twenty20 cricket team based in Manchester, Lancashire that competed in England’s women's Twenty20 competition, the Women's Cricket Super League. [1] Thunder played their home matches at Old Trafford and various grounds across the North West. [2] They were captained by Kate Cross and coached by Mark McInnes, working with General Manager Bobby Cross. [3] In 2020, following reforms to the structure of women's domestic cricket, some elements of Lancashire Thunder were retained for a new team, North West Thunder. [4]

Contents

History

2016-2019: Women's Cricket Super League

Lancashire Thunder were formed in 2016 to compete in the new Women's Cricket Super League, partnering with Lancashire CCC. [5] In their inaugural season, they finished bottom of the group stage, winning just one game. [6] In 2017, they fared even worse, failing to win a game as they finished bottom of the group once again. [7]

2018 brought an expansion to the WCSL, with each side now playing 10 games, and Lancashire Thunder improved under the new format, winning 5 out of their 10 games. [8] However, this still meant they just missed out on progressing to Finals Day, finishing 4th. Thunder bowler Sophie Ecclestone was the third highest wicket-taker in the tournament, with 15. [9] In 2019, Lancashire Thunder once again finished bottom of the group, with no wins and one tie. [10] Following this season, women's cricket in England was restructured and Lancashire Thunder were disbanded as part of the reforms; however they survived in spirit for a new team, North West Thunder, who represented a larger area, but retained some of their players. [11]

Home grounds

VenueGames hosted by season
16 17 18 19 Total
Old Trafford Cricket Ground 11215
Stanley Park, Blackpool 11114
Aigburth Cricket Ground, Liverpool 1124
Trafalgar Road Ground 11
Chester Boughton Hall 11

Players

Final squad, 2019 season [12]

No.NameNationalityBirth dateBatting StyleBowling StyleNotes
Batters
8 Georgie Boyce Flag of England.svg  England 4 October 1998 (age 22)Right-handedRight-arm medium
11 Evelyn Jones Flag of England.svg  England 8 August 1992 (age 29)Left-handedLeft-arm medium England Academy player
30 Danielle Collins Flag of England.svg  England 7 June 2000 (age 21)Left-handedRight-arm medium
77 Ria Fackrell Flag of England.svg  England 16 September 1999 (age 21)Right-handedRight-arm off break
All-rounders
6 Emma Lamb Flag of England.svg  England 16 December 1997 (age 23)Right-handedRight-arm off break England Academy player
7 Harmanpreet Kaur  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of India.svg  India 8 March 1989 (age 32)Right-handedRight-arm off break Overseas player
10 Natalie Brown Flag of England.svg  England 16 October 1990 (age 30)Right-handedRight-arm medium
14 Tahlia McGrath  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 10 November 1995 (age 25)Right-handedRight-arm medium Overseas player
47 Sophia Dunkley  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of England.svg  England 16 July 1998 (age 23)Right-handedRight-arm leg break
96 Sune Luus  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 5 January 1996 (age 25)Right-handedRight-arm leg break Overseas player
Wicket-keepers
21 Eleanor Threlkeld Flag of England.svg  England 16 November 1998 (age 22)Right-handedEngland Academy player
Bowlers
16 Kate Cross  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of England.svg  England 3 October 1991 (age 29)Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast Club captain; England Performance squad
19 Sophie Ecclestone  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of England.svg  England 6 May 1999 (age 22)Right-handed Slow left-arm orthodox England Academy player
63 Alice Dyson Flag of England.svg  England 28 January 1999 (age 22)Right-handedRight-arm medium
65 Alex Hartley  Double-dagger-14-plain.pngFlag of England.svg  England 6 September 1993 (age 27)Right-handed Slow left-arm orthodox

Overseas players

Seasons

SeasonFinal standingLeague standingsNotes
PWLTNRBPPtsNRRPos
2016 Group Stage5140002–1.7246thDNQ
2017 Group Stage5050000–1.6926thDNQ
2018 Group Stage105500121–0.8254thDNQ
2019 Group Stage10091002–1.1946thDNQ

Statistics

Overall Results

Summary of Results [13]
YearPlayedWinsLossesTiedNRWin %
2016 5140020.00
2017 505000.00
2018 10550050.00
2019 1009100.00
Total306231021.66

Teamwise Result summary

OppositionMatWonLostTiedNRWin %
Southern Vipers 6231041.66
Yorkshire Diamonds 6240033.33
Western Storm 606000.00
Surrey Stars 6150016.66
Loughborough Lightning 6150016.66

Records

See also

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References

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  2. "ECB unveil teams and schedule for Women's Cricket Super League". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  3. "McInnes to lead Lancashire Thunder". Lancashire Cricket. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  4. "Women's Regional Hubs to play for Rachael Heyhoe Flint Trophy". the Cricketer. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  5. "Women's Cricket Super League: Six successful bids announced for new T20 league". BBC Sport. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  6. "Women's Super League 2016 Table". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  7. "Women's Cricket Super League 2017 Table". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  8. "Women's Cricket Super League 2018 Table". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  9. "Women's Cricket Super League, 2018/Most Wickets". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  10. "Women's Cricket Super League 2019 Table". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  11. "ECB launches new plan to transform women's and girls' cricket". England and Wales Cricket Board. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  12. "Full Lancashire Thunder squad confirmed for 2019". Lancashire Cricket. Retrieved July 19, 2019.
  13. "Women Cricket Super League match result summary". ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  14. "Lancashire Thunder Highest totals". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  15. "Lancashire Thunder Lowest totals". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  16. "Lancashire Thunder Highest scores". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  17. "Lancashire Thunder Best Bowling Figures in an Innings". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  18. "Lancashire Thunder Most runs". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  19. "Lancashire Thunder Most wickets". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 14 December 2020.