Ministers of the French National Convention

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Ministers of the French National Convention
Flag of France.svg  France
cabinet of France
Pantheon autel Convention nationale 1.JPG
Autel de la Convention nationale by François-Léon Sicard (1913)
Date formed 10 August 1792
Date dissolved 1 April 1794
People and organisations
Head of state President of the National Convention
Head of government National Convention (collective)
No. of ministers 6
Ministers removed
(Death/resignation/dismissal)
11
Total no. of ministers 17
Member party Maraisard
Montagnard
Girondin (1792–93)
Status in legislature National Convention
Opposition party Unopposed
Opposition leader N/A
History
Election(s) 1792
Legislature term(s) 7 September 1792 – 12 October 1795
Predecessor Constitutional Cabinet of Louis XVI
Successor Commissioners of the Committee of Public Safety

The ministers of the French National Convention were appointed on 10 August 1792 after the French Legislative Assembly suspended King Louis XVI and revoked the ministers that he had named. [1]

Louis XVI of France King of France and Navarre

Louis XVI, born Louis-Auguste, was the last King of France before the fall of the monarchy during the French Revolution. He was referred to as Citizen Louis Capet during the four months before he was guillotined. In 1765, at the death of his father, Louis, son and heir apparent of Louis XV, Louis-Auguste became the new Dauphin of France. Upon his grandfather's death on 10 May 1774, he assumed the title "King of France and Navarre", which he used until 4 September 1791, when he received the title of "King of the French" until the monarchy was abolished on 21 September 1792.

On 12 Germinal year II (1 April 1794) Lazare Carnot proposed to suppress the executive council and the six ministers, replacing the ministers with twelve Committees reporting to the Committee of Public Safety. The proposal was unanimously adopted by the National Convention. [2]

Lazare Carnot French political, engineering and mathematical figure

Lazare Nicolas Marguerite, Count Carnot was a French mathematician, physicist and politician. He was known as the Organizer of Victory in the French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars.

The Commissioners of the Committee of Public Safety were appointed by the French Committee of Public Safety to oversee the various administrative departments between 1 April 1794 and 1 November 1795.

Committee of Public Safety De facto executive government in France (1793–1794)

The Committee of Public Safety, created in April 1793 by the National Convention and then restructured in July 1793, formed the de facto executive government in France during the Reign of Terror (1793–1794), a stage of the French Revolution. The Committee of Public Safety succeeded the previous Committee of General Defence and assumed its role of protecting the newly established republic against foreign attacks and internal rebellion. As a wartime measure, the Committee—composed at first of nine and later of twelve members—was given broad supervisory powers over military, judicial and legislative efforts. It was formed as an administrative body to supervise and expedite the work of the executive bodies of the Convention and of the government ministers appointed by the Convention. As the Committee tried to meet the dangers of a coalition of European nations and counter-revolutionary forces within the country, it became more and more powerful.

Ministers

PortfolioMinisterTook officeLeft officeParty
Head of Government  National Convention 10 August 17921 April 1794 Independent
Minister of Finances   Étienne Clavière [3] 10 August 179213 June 1793 Girondin
  Louis Destournelles [4] 13 June 17931 April 1794 Montagnard
Minister of Foreign Affairs   Pierre Lebrun-Tondu [3] 10 August 179221 June 1793 Girondin
  François Chemin Deforgues [4] 21 June 17931 April 1794 Montagnard
Minister of War   Joseph Servan de Gerbey [3] 10 August 17923 October 1792 Girondin
  Jean-Nicolas Pache [4] 3 October 17924 February 1793 Montagnard
  Pierre Riel de Beurnonville [4] 4 February 17934 April 1793 Independent
  Jean Baptiste Bouchotte [4] 4 April 17931 April 1794 Montagnard
Minister of the Interior   Jean-Marie Roland, vicomte de la Platière [3] 10 August 179214 March 1793 Girondin
  Dominique Joseph Garat [4] 14 March 179320 August 1793 Girondin
  Jules-François Paré [4] 20 August 17931 April 1794 Marais
Minister of Justice   Georges Danton [3] 10 August 179210 October 1792 Montagnard
 Dominique Joseph Garat [4] 10 October 179220 March 1793 Girondin
  Louis-Jérôme Gohier [4] 20 March 17931 April 1794 Marais
Minister of the Navy and Colonies   Gaspard Monge [3] 10 August 179210 April 1793 Montagnard
  Jean Dalbarade [4] 10 April 17931 April 1794 Independent

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References

Citations

  1. Muel 1891, p. 25.
  2. Muel 1891, p. 41-42.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Muel 1891, p. 28.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Muel 1891, p. 33.

Sources