Novhorod-Siverskyi

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Novhorod-Siverskyi

Новгород-Сіверський

Nowogród Siewierski Новгород-Северский
Town
Novgorod-Sivers'kii. Budinok kuptsia Medvedieva.JPG
Merchant's house in Novhorod-Siverskyi
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Flag
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Coat of arms
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Novhorod-Siverskyi
Location of Novhorod-Siverskyi in Ukraine
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Novhorod-Siverskyi
Novhorod-Siverskyi (Ukraine)
Coordinates: 51°59′N33°16′E / 51.983°N 33.267°E / 51.983; 33.267 Coordinates: 51°59′N33°16′E / 51.983°N 33.267°E / 51.983; 33.267
Country Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine
Oblast Flag of Chernihiv Oblast.svg  Chernihiv Oblast
Raion Novhorod-Siverskyi Raion
Area
  Total11.81 km2 (4.56 sq mi)
Population
 (2018)
  Total13,289

Novhorod-Siverskyi (Ukrainian : Новгород-Сіверський [ˈnɔu̯ɦorod ˈs⁽ʲ⁾iwersʲkɪj] ; Polish : Nowogród Siewierski) is a historic city in Chernihiv Oblast (province) of Ukraine. It is the administrative center of Novhorod-Siverskyi Raion, though it is incorporated as a city of oblast significance and does not belong to the raion. Novhorod-Siverskyi is situated on the bank of the Desna River, 330 km from the capital, Kiev, and 45 km south of the Russian border. Population: 13,762(2015 est.) [1]

Contents

History

Historical affiliations

Principality of Novgorod-Seversk 1185–1240
Alex K Grundwald flags 1410-03.svg Grand Duchy of Lithuania 1320–1503
Lob flag moskovskiy.svg Grand Duchy of Moscow 1503–1547
Flag of Oryol (variant).svg Tsardom of Russia 1547–1618
Choragiew krolewska krola Zygmunta III Wazy.svg Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth 1618–1667
Flag of Oryol (variant).svg Tsardom of Russia 1667–1721
Flag of The Russian Empire 1883.svg  Russian Empire 1721–1917
Flag of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (1919-1929).svg Soviet Ukraine 1919–1922
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 1922–1991
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine 1991–present

The town was first chronicled in 1044. From 1098 it was the capital of the Siverian Principality, which served as a buffer zone against incursions of the Cumans (Polovtsy) and other steppe peoples. One of the numerous campaigns of local princes against the Cumans produced the great monument of early East Slavic literature, the Tale of Igor's Campaign.

After the town's destruction by Mongols in 1239, it passed to the princes of Bryansk and then to the Grand Dukes of Lithuania. It was ruled by Dymitr Korybut (Kaributas), son of Algirdas. Muscovy obtained the area following the Battle of Vedrosha in 1503, but lost it to Poland after the Time of Troubles. Nowogród Siewierski was granted Magdeburg city rights in 1620 by Polish King Sigismund III Vasa. It was the easternmost powiat (county) seat of Poland. The town passed to Russia as a result of the Russo-Polish War (1654-1667). During the Cossack epoch, it received the status of military company town (sotenne misto) and later regimental town (polkove misto); these were military and administrative divisions in the Cossack army and country. Also Novhorod-Siverskyi became a cultural center of Left-bank Ukraine. It was made the capital of a separate namestnichestvo in 1782–97. Thereafter its importance steadily declined.

During World War II, Novhorod-Siverskyi was occupied by the German Army from 26 August 1941 to 16 September 1943.

Architecture

Despite historic disasters, the town has preserved many architectural monuments, and a branch of the Chernihiv State Historical and Architectural Preserve has been established. The town has managed to keep random planning in its landscape. The boundary of the town historical center is vague. The tourist attractions are located on two high capes divided by ravines: the ensemble of Our Savior and Transfiguration Monastery and the town centre. The architectural monuments of state significance are scattered on five separate areas which compose the territory of the preserve. The biggest area is the territory of Our Savior and Transfiguration Monastery. The other areas are Uspensky (Dormition) Cathedral, the wooden St. Nicolas church, a triumphal arch, and shopping arcades. There are constructions and residential buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries in the town centre. The main point of interest in the town is the former residence of the Chernihiv metropolitans, the monastery of the Saviour's Transfiguration. It features a ponderous Neoclassical cathedral (1791–96, design by Giacomo Quarenghi), seventeenth-century stone walls, and several ecclesiastic foundations dating from the sixteenth century. Other landmarks include the Cossack Baroque Assumption cathedral, a triumphal arch (1787), and the wooden church of St. Nicholas (1760).

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References

  1. "Чисельність наявного населення України (Actual population of Ukraine)" (PDF) (in Ukrainian). State Statistics Service of Ukraine . Retrieved 1 July 2016.