Oriente warbler

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Oriente warbler
Oriente warbler (Teretistris fornsi) - cropped.jpg
Cayo Romano, Cuba
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Teretistridae
Genus: Teretistris
Species:
T. fornsi
Binomial name
Teretistris fornsi
Gundlach, 1858
Teretistris fornsi map.svg
Range of T. fornsi

The Oriente warbler (Teretistris fornsi) is a species of bird in the Cuban warbler family, Teretistridae, that is endemic to Cuba. Its natural habitats dry forests, lowland moist forests, montane moist forests, and xeric shrublands. As its common name implies, the Oriente warbler is found in Cuba's east; it is the sister species to its fellow Cuban endemic, the Yellow-headed warbler, found in extreme western Cuba.

Bird Warm-blooded, egg-laying vertebrates with wings, feathers and beaks

Birds, also known as Aves or avian dinosaurs, are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Birds live worldwide and range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) bee hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) ostrich. They rank as the world's most numerically-successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerines, sometimes known as perching birds. Birds have wings which are more or less developed depending on the species; the only known groups without wings are the extinct moa and elephant birds. Wings, which evolved from forelimbs, gave birds the ability to fly, although further evolution has led to the loss of flight in flightless birds, including ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species of birds. The digestive and respiratory systems of birds are also uniquely adapted for flight. Some bird species of aquatic environments, particularly seabirds and some waterbirds, have further evolved for swimming.

Cuban warbler Tiny family of birds found only in Cuba

The Cuban warblers are a genus, Teretistris, and family, Teretistridae, of birds endemic to Cuba and its surrounding cays. Until 2002 they were thought to be New World warblers, but DNA studies have shown that they are not closely related to that family. The family consists of two species, the yellow-headed warbler and the Oriente warbler. Both species are found in forest and scrub, with the yellow-headed warbler ranging in the west of the island and the Oriente warbler in the east. The Cuban warblers are 13 cm (5.1 in) long and have similar yellow and grey plumage.

Endemism Ecological state of being unique to a defined geographic location or habitat

Endemism is the ecological state of a species being unique to a defined geographic location, such as an island, nation, country or other defined zone, or habitat type; organisms that are indigenous to a place are not endemic to it if they are also found elsewhere. The extreme opposite of endemism is cosmopolitan distribution. An alternative term for a species that is endemic is precinctive, which applies to species that are restricted to a defined geographical area.

This species measures 13 cm (5.1 in) long. Upperparts are uniformly medium-grey. Underparts are mostly yellow, with a light grey belly. A whitish eye ring and slightly decurved bill are distinctive traits. [2]

Feeds on insects, spiders and small lizards. [2]

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References

  1. BirdLife International (2012). "Teretistris fornsi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature . Retrieved 26 November 2013.
  2. 1 2 Garrido, Orlando H.; Kirkconnell, Arturo (2000). Field Guide to the Birds of Cuba. Ithaca, NY: Comstock, Cornell University Press. p. 201. ISBN   978-0-8014-8631-9.

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